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Promoting academic innovation by valuing
and enabling disruptive design
Andrew Middleton
Head of Innovation & Professional...
Introductions
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

Hello!
Why are we interested in curriculum design?
Session outline
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
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Introductions
Curriculum Design @ SHU background
Defining priorities for collaborative ...
Background:
The Design Studio

Our Challenge: how to engage multiple stakeholders
effectively in curriculum design
Student...
changes perceptions of design
accommodates
multiple stakeholder
perspectives

manages risks
tests different ideas safely

...
Background:
Why Studio?
Opportunity, space and structure
Open and supportive
Space: time, people, place
Contained activi...
Defining priorities for collaborative design
teams
Analysing needs and identifying priorities
Radar Discussion tool

•


...
Principle-based design and other
approaches
Principle-based facilitation
“Rhetorical resources” – Nicol (2012)
 High level educational aspiration
 Problem domain/ar...
Key Tools
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


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Screencasts
Priority analysis tool
Design lens based upon the
Viewpoints (University of Ulster)
met...
Designing the Design Lens
Example: Learner Engagement
development workshops for staff and
studentsprinciples and framework...
Activity: Principles of Digital Literacy
Identify between 5 and 7 key ideas that
together encapsulate what digital literac...
Scenario-Based Design
About scenarios
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Descriptions of the past, present or
future
Risk-free tools for imagining the
future and fo...
Why use scenarios for curriculum design?
Scenarios,


Use diverse kinds and amounts of detailing



Present alternative ...
Scenarios address 6 challenges
1.

Reflect on designs and processes

2.

Co-ordinate collaborative design action and refle...
4 ways to use scenarios to support
curriculum design
Collaborative design teams can,
1.Construct

scenarios to work out an...
Forming successful scenarios - characteristics


Goals, sub-goals or outcomes



Settings





Agents or actors playin...
Presenting successful scenarios


Scenarios use natural language query and are presented
as short narratives and can use ...
Activity: Facilitating the design of
pedagogy to promote learner
 Generate

ideas for a New Staff Induction Programme usi...
Activity: Build your scenarios!
To capture and communicate your idea
Agree media
Include:


Goals, sub-goals or outcomes
...
Activity: other approaches
Devise and share other collaborative design methods


Analyse what is needed and identify prio...
Conclusions
 Curriculum

design activities and a key opportunity for
promoting academic innovation
 Involving ‘others’ e...
References
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

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Bryson, C., & Hand, L. (2007). The role of engagement in inspiring teaching and learning....
Promoting academic innovation by valuing and enabling disruptive design
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Promoting academic innovation by valuing and enabling disruptive design

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Methods used to empower diverse curriculum design teams reviewing and creating new courses

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Promoting academic innovation by valuing and enabling disruptive design

  1. 1. Promoting academic innovation by valuing and enabling disruptive design Andrew Middleton Head of Innovation & Professional Development @andrewmid
  2. 2. Introductions   Hello! Why are we interested in curriculum design?
  3. 3. Session outline          Introductions Curriculum Design @ SHU background Defining priorities for collaborative design teams Principle-based design and other approaches Designing a design lens Scenario-based design Building scenarios Devising and sharing other collaborative design methods Conclusions
  4. 4. Background: The Design Studio Our Challenge: how to engage multiple stakeholders effectively in curriculum design Students and others not directly involved in teaching Why: breadth of experience knowledge perspectives accommodate diverse stakeholder requirements How: Two day design team immersive think tank Principle-based facilitation
  5. 5. changes perceptions of design accommodates multiple stakeholder perspectives manages risks tests different ideas safely develops staff disruptive design encourages dialogue suspends reality generates alternatives addresses intended outcomes develops stakeholder relationships supports collaboration
  6. 6. Background: Why Studio? Opportunity, space and structure Open and supportive Space: time, people, place Contained activity Critical friendship Co-operation and collaboration Safe risked-based thinking Communal validation 
  7. 7. Defining priorities for collaborative design teams Analysing needs and identifying priorities Radar Discussion tool •  Alumni goldfish bowl - observed structured group discussion  Student evaluations (surveys or video evaluations)  NSS analysis  What else?
  8. 8. Principle-based design and other approaches
  9. 9. Principle-based facilitation “Rhetorical resources” – Nicol (2012)  High level educational aspiration  Problem domain/area of concern  Practice-orientated principles  A compelling narrative  Examples of application  Research evidence – to focus useful conversation – e.g. stakeholder participation – e.g. graduate attributes – often set out in ‘literature’ – what do the principles mean – associated case studies – associated ‘toolkits’
  10. 10. Key Tools      Screencasts Priority analysis tool Design lens based upon the Viewpoints (University of Ulster) method Set of cards, each addressing ideas supporting one principle Online resource-base (Toolkit) Assessment & feedback lens from University of Ulster
  11. 11. Designing the Design Lens Example: Learner Engagement development workshops for staff and studentsprinciples and frameworks found in academic Explored    literature on learner engagement Reflected on their experience and expectations and generated examples of engaging practice Generate new ideas using creativity methods (i.e. word association, photo elicitation, scenario writing) Assessment & Feedback lens from University of Ulster
  12. 12. Activity: Principles of Digital Literacy Identify between 5 and 7 key ideas that together encapsulate what digital literacy means. 1. Ability to find, select, retrieve and use digital information 2…. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.
  13. 13. Scenario-Based Design
  14. 14. About scenarios        Descriptions of the past, present or future Risk-free tools for imagining the future and for asking ‘what-if..?’ Colourful narratives or process statements 'Good enough' representations of possibilities... ...or highly detailed Scenarios set the scene for discussion Scenarios can concretise ideas for development “a concrete description of “a concrete description of activity that the user activity that the user engages in when engages in when performing a specific task, performing a specific task, description sufficiently description sufficiently detailed so that design detailed so that design implications can be inferred implications can be inferred and reasoned about” and reasoned about” -- Carroll (1995) Carroll (1995)
  15. 15. Why use scenarios for curriculum design? Scenarios,  Use diverse kinds and amounts of detailing  Present alternative consequences of action  Can be abstracted and categorised Help designers to recognise, capture, modify and reuse generalisations or patterns   Support reasoning Make design tasks accessible to diverse expert stakeholder groups 
  16. 16. Scenarios address 6 challenges 1. Reflect on designs and processes 2. Co-ordinate collaborative design action and reflection 3. Manage risk by having something that appears concrete and remains flexible 4. Manage the fluidity of design situations 5. Consider multiple views of an interaction 6. (Capture outputs of idea generation) Designers have to continually make commitments without making Designers have to continually make commitments without making commitments! commitments! Designers say “What if…” Designers say “What if…”
  17. 17. 4 ways to use scenarios to support curriculum design Collaborative design teams can, 1.Construct scenarios to work out and communicate their thinking 2.Construct scenarios to capture and communicate their thinking 3.Review or compare representations of existing pedagogy 4.Review or compare representations of proposed pedagogy
  18. 18. Forming successful scenarios - characteristics  Goals, sub-goals or outcomes  Settings   Agents or actors playing primary or supporting roles (descriptions of who is involved, how and why) Plot - sequences of actions and events done by or to the actors or changes to the setting. Changes to events show how scenarios can be used dynamically to assess different decisions and outcomes.
  19. 19. Presenting successful scenarios  Scenarios use natural language query and are presented as short narratives and can use various media, e.g.  Text  Visualisations, diagrams, pictures, etc.  Comic strips and storyboards  Videos  Multimedia  Post-it notes
  20. 20. Activity: Facilitating the design of pedagogy to promote learner  Generate ideas for a New Staff Induction Programme using the Learner Engagement and Authentic Learning design lenses (or our Digital Literacy lens!).  Focus on a small part of the Induction Course which will be run over 3 x 2 hour workshops and be supported by online resources.  Work towards constructing a scenario statement to support the communication and evaluation of you idea
  21. 21. Activity: Build your scenarios! To capture and communicate your idea Agree media Include:  Goals, sub-goals or outcomes  Settings   Agents or actors playing primary or supporting roles (descriptions of who is involved, how and why) Plot - sequences of actions and events done by or to the actors or changes to the setting. Changes to events show how scenarios can be used dynamically to assess different decisions and outcomes.
  22. 22. Activity: other approaches Devise and share other collaborative design methods  Analyse what is needed and identify priorities  Design together  Capture ideas and develop them further  Evaluate approaches  Breakout and feedback
  23. 23. Conclusions  Curriculum design activities and a key opportunity for promoting academic innovation  Involving ‘others’ early is useful, difficult – but possible!  Innovation is risky – but risk can be managed through collaborative engagement and validation
  24. 24. References         Bryson, C., & Hand, L. (2007). The role of engagement in inspiring teaching and learning. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 44(4), pp.349–362. Carroll, J.M. (2000). Five reasons for scenario-based design. Interacting with Computers 13, pp.43 – 60. Fowler, C.J.H, van Helvert, J; Gardner, M.G, and Scott, J.R. (2007). The use of scenarios in designing and delivering learning systems. In: H. Beetham & R. Sharpe, Rethinking Pedagogy in a Digital Age: Designing and delivering e-learning. London: Routledge Herrington, J. (2006). Authentic e-learning in higher education: design principles for authentic learning environments and tasks. Online at: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/5247 Nicol, D. (2012). Principles as discourse. JISC Webinar, 20 th March 2012 Nicol, D., & Draper, S. (2009). A blueprint for transformational organisational change in higher education: REAP as a case study. In: Mayes, T., Morrison, D., Mellar, H., Bullen, P. & Oliver, M., (eds) ‘Transforming higher education through technology-enhanced learning.’ York: Higher Education Academy. O’Donnell, C., Masson, A., & Harrison, J. (2011). Encouraging creativity and reflection in the curriculum. SEDA Spring Teaching Learning and Assessment Conference 2011, "Academics for the 21st Century", 5th May 2011 - 06 May 2011, Holyrood Hotel, Edinburgh.

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