#MarketingShake – Jon Busman – Winning: Como los líderes de Marketing capturan al cliente conectado

1,340 views

Published on

Jon Busman. CMO Iniciative Global Marketing Lead IBM, by amdia. www.amdia.org.ar/marketingshake

Published in: Marketing
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,340
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
881
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Winning: How leading marketers captivate the connected consumer
    The rise of the connected consumer has radically reshaped the marketing discipline. Today, captivating your consumer with a seamless experience as they engage across your organization is a necessity. The reshaping of marketing has changed our understanding of consumers, how we can use data and technology to provide unique and personal experiences, and even who we partner with to achieve success. Join us as we examine 3 fundamental marketing imperatives that leading companies are using to achieve a competitive advantage. All the while learning how you can transform your practices to become a marketing winner in 2014.
  • In February 2012, The New York Times published an article by Charles Duhigg (Doo-hig) titled, “How Companies Learn Your Secrets.” It was a story that simultaneously captured:
    The future of marketing
    Some very interesting possibilities for me as a customer
    And some chilling risks about the new responsibilities in this era.
  • Look at the lead paragraph of this article. It says so much about our topic—the future practice of marketing.
    These 64 words capture:
    The promise of what marketing is becoming…finding a way to serve customer needs, even in advance of that customer being able to voice what he or she wants from us.
    A way of serving that customer based on a fuller, more personal picture of what that individual wants.
    How data—and analytics—are becoming core to the profession. And how that is changing the skills we require, and what collaboration looks like. The critical partnership in the article is between a statistician and his marketing colleagues.
    And we see the responsibilities in security and privacy measures we must now rise to. The phrase…“even if she didn’t want us to know”…now that has tremendous implications.
    Now, of course, executives do their reading on Sunday too. Did any of you get a call from your boss asking, “Do we have this predictive capability?”
    But perhaps more than that, the bigger point of the article is actually about what motivates and compels a customer to behave in new ways. And by implication, what is marketing’s role in helping customers develop new habits of choosing our companies--authentically desiring to do business with us?
    So let’s talk more about how our profession is changing. And let’s start with what most agree are the timeless responsibilities of marketing.
  • For a long time, marketers have had three big marketing responsibilities:
    Marketers have always been responsible for knowing the customer.
    Marketers have always been responsible for defining what to market,
    and how to market.
    Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    How are these responsibilities changing? Over the past year, IBM talked with more than 1,700 CMOs, analyzed academic writings, took a look at what content and ideas were shared through social media, and interviewed several CMO CIO Leadership Exchange participants. Based on that, this is where we collectively think our profession is going.
  • Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    In a world of radical transparency, each experience with the company is a test of its promise. And while we once lived in a world where gaps between that promise and reality were experienced by, well, those who experienced them, in an interconnected world a poor experience travels into the realm of social media out to tens, hundreds, thousands or, in some cases, millions of other people’s lives. That magnification also works in the reverse—positive experiences are magnified. One CMO summed it up as: “How we are is who we are.”
    Our new role is to put the best insurance policy in place: to build a brand and culture that are authentically one.
  • This study covers 4,183 face-to-face conversations with CxOs in 70 countries
    8,000+ clients in more than 50 countries
    #1 in market share for marketing automation*
    #1 in market share for Digital Agencies**
    7th consecutive year powering more US Top 500 online retailer sales
    65% of most influential CMOs use IBM solutions
  • As we mentioned before, IBM’s The State of Marketing 2013 research study found that clear leaders leverage marketing technologies with specific practices. The companies of 20% of the marketers we talked to outperform their peers – not only on marketing ROI, but when it comes to growth in gross profit, net income, and stock price. This research shows that executing on a new vision of marketing directly influences a company’s bottom line.
    *Source: The State of Marketing 2013, a research study by the IBM Center for Applied Insights. © IBM 2013
  • For a long time, marketers have had three big marketing responsibilities:
    Marketers have always been responsible for knowing the customer.
    Marketers have always been responsible for defining what to market,
    and how to market.
    Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    How are these responsibilities changing? Over the past year, IBM talked with more than 1,700 CMOs, analyzed academic writings, took a look at what content and ideas were shared through social media, and interviewed several CMO CIO Leadership Exchange participants. Based on that, this is where we collectively think our profession is going.
  • Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    In a world of radical transparency, each experience with the company is a test of its promise. And while we once lived in a world where gaps between that promise and reality were experienced by, well, those who experienced them, in an interconnected world a poor experience travels into the realm of social media out to tens, hundreds, thousands or, in some cases, millions of other people’s lives. That magnification also works in the reverse—positive experiences are magnified. One CMO summed it up as: “How we are is who we are.”
    Our new role is to put the best insurance policy in place: to build a brand and culture that are authentically one.
  • Our research shows that 9 out of 10 people are begging for a personalized experience, and are willing to spend 20 minutes to set up their personal information to help retailers give them a better experience
    And yet!...only 32% of the enterprises surveyed claim to be able to leverage this and engage with customers as individuals
    We see consistently that acquiring new customers and improving loyalty and satisfaction appear year over year as marketers’ top goals.
    Source: The State of Marketing 2013, a research study by the IBM Center for Applied Insights. © IBM 2013
  • Banco Itau Argentina is an example of an organization that understands each customer as an individual.
    The bank developed predictive models to identify which customer were most likely to respond to a promotion or account offering.
    They implemented a cross-selling system which anticipated the next best offering likely to interest a customer.
    In order to optimize the engagements, a sales optimization system was introduced that measured expected revenue from the engagement and aligned that with cost of making the sale.
    This enables a customized dialog and personalized product offer based upon particular customer needs.
    By understanding each customer as an individual, Banco Itau Argentina reported a 40% higher contribution margin from their existing customers and 60% higher contribution margin from new customers.
  • Nordstrom understands their customer as an individual.
    This understanding goes beyond purchase history and preferences to an awareness of how online ad impressions directly and indirectly influence their purchases.
    Nordstrom’s click through rates on online ads was extremely low, yet there was evidence of a downstream effect of these impressions.
    Nordstrom started tracking web site visitors from the moment they see an ad, even if they never clicked it.
    Hours, days, even weeks later when the customer visited nordstrom.com they were able to link that visit with a previous online impression; signaling they may have indirectly influenced the individual customer.
    The newfound customer understanding allowed Nordstrom to optimize campaigns, grow sales, and improve ROI by 15% with no increase to the marketing budget.
  • What are that moments that matter most
    Which create the biggest opportunity to disappoint or delight your clients?
    Can you turn a negative moment positive?
    What level of granularity of context is needed to enhance the moment?
    Are you empowered throughout the enterprise
    Can you innovate rapidly and adjust
    Can you scale and do you have the right tools to do so
    What is the nature of the brand, who can help you deliver the experience (customers, employees, partners)
    Who are the stakeholders
    What changes would you need to make at speed and scale
  • Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    In a world of radical transparency, each experience with the company is a test of its promise. And while we once lived in a world where gaps between that promise and reality were experienced by, well, those who experienced them, in an interconnected world a poor experience travels into the realm of social media out to tens, hundreds, thousands or, in some cases, millions of other people’s lives. That magnification also works in the reverse—positive experiences are magnified. One CMO summed it up as: “How we are is who we are.”
    Our new role is to put the best insurance policy in place: to build a brand and culture that are authentically one.
  • Telefonica drastically increases sales and lowers costs by using highly detailed profiling and call analysis to send only customized marketing communications to its customers
    Better Business
    Using call data, demographics and predictive modeling to offer customers the products and services that match their needs and lifestyles.
    Leveraging detailed segmentation and customized communications via text and email to anticipate what subscribers need and present it at just the right time. Telefonica created a system of engagement that executes 200 campaigns per month, coordinating and optimizing its outreach based on customer response.
    They started by understanding their customer as an individual by their purchases, behavior, and external data.
    The system then gathers data from throughout the enterprise to learn how their customers are using their services across voice, data, and SMS.
    Mobile communications subscribers are targeted with highly individualized offers specific to their calling, texting and web browsing patterns.
    Subscriber demographic data is used help design products and market strategies for similar prospects
    Telefonica has realized a 30% increase in revenue from direct marketing, 80% reduction in marketing campaign costs, and see a 5x sales increase on campaign launch days.
    Through the system of engagement, Telefonica is able to continually evolve the customer profiles, devising creative campaigns and optimize personalized marketing.
  • Let’s talk about expanding the definition of marketing and breaking down siloes.
    If you have ever been delayed, frustrated and stuck at an airport, you know what a nightmare that can be and all you need is a little piece of information.
    AirFrance KLM recognized this as an opportunity to seize the moment and turn a frustrating situation into a positive moment of engagement.
    Working together, the marketing team led an effort working with the customer service team to deploy a marketing system of engagement which informs and alerts their customers – in near real time for flight delays, cancellations, gate changes and additional check in options that customer may have.
    To show that personal connection, AirFrance KLM chose to provide this customer service, delivered via mobile messages, at key points along the customer journey.
    As a result, the number of customer calls have dropped and the cost of handling individual calls has decreased dramatically.
    And, their customers open and click rates have increased because they have become a trusted source of valuable information at the right moment.
  • What are that moments that matter most
    Which create the biggest opportunity to disappoint or delight your clients?
    Can you turn a negative moment positive?
    What level of granularity of context is needed to enhance the moment?
    Are you empowered throughout the enterprise
    Can you innovate rapidly and adjust
    Can you scale and do you have the right tools to do so
    What is the nature of the brand, who can help you deliver the experience (customers, employees, partners)
    Who are the stakeholders
    What changes would you need to make at speed and scale
  • Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    In a world of radical transparency, each experience with the company is a test of its promise. And while we once lived in a world where gaps between that promise and reality were experienced by, well, those who experienced them, in an interconnected world a poor experience travels into the realm of social media out to tens, hundreds, thousands or, in some cases, millions of other people’s lives. That magnification also works in the reverse—positive experiences are magnified. One CMO summed it up as: “How we are is who we are.”
    Our new role is to put the best insurance policy in place: to build a brand and culture that are authentically one.
  • Children’s Medical Center approached their authentic culture and brand in a different way.
    Children’s Medical Center created customer advocates and private support communities, allowing customers to easily interact.
    This allowed for parents of the patients to network and facilitates an exceptional customer experience.
    No only does Children’s Medical Center benefit from this customer experience which differentiates them, they also experienced a 75% reduction is clinic phone calls.
  • Mondelez, Snack food purveyor and owner of Kraft Oreos and Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese, is taking engagement in the moment to new levels. “Dunking in the dark” became a phenomenon when the lights went out at Super Bowl XLVIII. Oreo tweeted “you can still dunk in the dark” and viewers responded in droves. Mondelez also found a new cure for the sweet tooth thanks to Pinterest. Users were posting recipes for “Oreo balls” made from crushed cookies and Philly cream cheese. Mondelez jumped into action, getting stores to co-locate this unlikely but popular combo with the “Oreo ball” recipe. Sales shot up.
    Mondelez took even more engaging action in China to get Chinese consumers to embrace the cookie. After struggling for years with a traditional marketing approach, Kraft decided to reintroduce the cookie using a series of social campaigns. Most effectively, Kraft hired NBA Basketball star Yao Ming as a brand ambassador. Then using online gaming, Kraft encouraged Chinese consumers to compete online with Ming in Oreo “Twist, Lick and Dunk” contests. Mothers were then asked to share their “Oreo Moments” in an online diary on China’s popular QZone social network. According to Kraft, the results blew them away. Clicks on the online gaming site topped 1.2 billion, with nearly 5 million page views and 1.5 million unique visitors. The first six months of the social media campaign on QZone saw 38 million unique visitors and more than 40 million user-generated “Oreo Moments.” Since the inception of the first digital campaign, Kraft representatives report that sales of Oreos in China have increased by more than 80 percent and in-store sales in some regions have tripled.
    And most recently, at the 2014 SXSW conference, Oreo took co-creating brand experiences to a whole new level by having people create their own Oreo flavor combinations – a slam dunk you might say…
  • What are that moments that matter most
    Which create the biggest opportunity to disappoint or delight your clients?
    Can you turn a negative moment positive?
    What level of granularity of context is needed to enhance the moment?
    Are you empowered throughout the enterprise
    Can you innovate rapidly and adjust
    Can you scale and do you have the right tools to do so
    What is the nature of the brand, who can help you deliver the experience (customers, employees, partners)
    Who are the stakeholders
    What changes would you need to make at speed and scale
  • For a long time, marketers have had three big marketing responsibilities:
    Marketers have always been responsible for knowing the customer.
    Marketers have always been responsible for defining what to market,
    and how to market.
    Marketers have always protected the brand promise.
    How are these responsibilities changing? Over the past year, IBM talked with more than 1,700 CMOs, analyzed academic writings, took a look at what content and ideas were shared through social media, and interviewed several CMO CIO Leadership Exchange participants. Based on that, this is where we collectively think our profession is going.
  • : out of 20 possible combinations of skills, three groups are particularly effective
  • Almost 30% of the world is online today and there are over 5 billion mobile subscriptions worldwide. Consumers are empowered and mobile and have all their research at their fingertips – they no longer trust the CSP but instead trust their friends on social networks – the ‘like’ status on Facebook from a friend carries the same weight to consumers today as 100 positive reviews from strangers.
    At the same time customer advocacy in the telecommunications market is low – significantly lower worldwide than other industries such as retail, etc. Certainly CSPs have a more complicated and enduring experience with their customer for each sales cycle but the value of advocacy remains the same.
    Advocates are 20% less likely to churn in the first 2 years, 20% more likely to stay 5 years or longer and most importantly, advocates allocate 12% more of their wallet-share spend with their CSP than antagonists do.
    Source: IBM 2011 CMO Study Results for Communications
  • Create a personalized CSP customer experience
    Optimize telecom marketing spend based on customer priority
    Understand the customer through promotion, ordering, fulfillment, returns of consumer premise equipment
    Identify customers who struggled with CSP engagement
    Create effective offers based on customer’s dynamic experience
    Provide a seamless shopping, ordering, fulfillment & returns via social, mobile, online & in-store experience
    Leverage dynamic orchestration of customer orders including on-location/installs & drop-ship of Consumer Premise Equipment
    Improve support experience by accelerating the customer's problem resolution & reduce call-handle time by shadow-browsing live customer sessions or the ability to replay any customer session
    Create a consistent brand experience across channels
    Monitor & curate customers to voice opinions
    Enable partners & contractors with contextual customer dialog
    Align resources to objectives, track budgets and expenses, and improve team collaboration
  • In February 2012, The New York Times published an article by Charles Duhigg (Doo-hig) titled, “How Companies Learn Your Secrets.” It was a story that simultaneously captured:
    The future of marketing
    Some very interesting possibilities for me as a customer
    And some chilling risks about the new responsibilities in this era.
  • In February 2012, The New York Times published an article by Charles Duhigg (Doo-hig) titled, “How Companies Learn Your Secrets.” It was a story that simultaneously captured:
    The future of marketing
    Some very interesting possibilities for me as a customer
    And some chilling risks about the new responsibilities in this era.
  • In February 2012, The New York Times published an article by Charles Duhigg (Doo-hig) titled, “How Companies Learn Your Secrets.” It was a story that simultaneously captured:
    The future of marketing
    Some very interesting possibilities for me as a customer
    And some chilling risks about the new responsibilities in this era.
  • #MarketingShake – Jon Busman – Winning: Como los líderes de Marketing capturan al cliente conectado

    1. 1. @namsub #marketingshake Photo Jon Busman @namsub Winning: Como los líderes de Marketing capturan al cliente conectado
    2. 2. @namsub #marketingshake In February of 2012, The New York Times published an article that gave us a glimpse of the future practice of marketing.
    3. 3. @namsub #marketingshake Responsabilidades atemporales para los profesionales de Marketing Siempre hemos tenido la responsabilidad de conocer al cliente. Siempre hemos sido responsables de definir qué llevar al mercado y cómo hacerlo. Siempre hemos protegido la promesa de marca.
    4. 4. Diseñar cultura y marca para que sean una. Crear un sistema de engagement que maximice la creación de valor en cada toque. Entender a cada cliente como individuo. 2012: Los tres imperativos de una nueva profesión
    5. 5. 8,000+ Clients 2013: 4,183 face to face interviews
    6. 6. Leading practices deliver leading results 1.8x Gross Profit 3.4x Net Income 2.4x Stock Price *SOURCE: The State of Marketing 2013: IBM’s Global Survey of Marketers, IBM Center for Applied Insights The Top 20%
    7. 7. Siempre hemos tenido la responsabilidad de conocer al cliente. Siempre hemos sido responsables de definir qué llevar al mercado y cómo hacerlo. Siempre hemos protegido la promesa de marca. Diseñar cultura y marca para que sean una. Crear un sistema de engagement que maximice la creación de valor en cada toque. Entender a cada cliente como individuo. Atemporal 2012
    8. 8. Conocer cada cliente y momento en contexto 2014: Evolución al Customer Engagement
    9. 9. 90% 32% of consumers expect personalization only claim to be highly effective at engaging individual customers Source: IBM Institute for Business Value and Center for Applied Insights
    10. 10. © 2013 IBM Corporation12 Banco Itaú Argentina Predictive customer context
    11. 11. ¿Qué momentos le importan más a tu cliente? • What are those moments worth to your brand and your company? • What information do you need to engage in these moments? • Where could you get that information? • Who in the organization needs that information?
    12. 12. Innovar y escalar experiencias personales que sean relevantes y gratificantes 2014: Evolución al Customer Engagement
    13. 13. ¿Qué esperiencia presonal gratificante puedes dar en ese momento? • Is it a negative or positive moment? • Can you connect multiple positive moments, or reverse a negative one? • Can you provide utility at little to no marginal cost to you? • Can you use digital to augment or reinforce physical interactions? • Can you turn a sale into a service? Or post-sales into marketing?
    14. 14. Co-crear con clientes, empleados y partners 2014: Evolución al Customer Engagement
    15. 15. “I have a defective Sony TV”
    16. 16. ¿ Con quién necesito colaborar para ejecutar? • Are you enabled to collaborate? • Who holds customer information or touches relevant to this moment? • What teams can you build to align skills, budget and buy-in? • Can you ask your customers, clients or partners to be a part of the solution? • Can you do it at speed and scale?
    17. 17. @namsub #marketingshake Marketing es ahora Customer Engagement Co-crear con clientes, empleados y partners Innovar y escalar experiencias personales que sean relevantes y gratificantes Conocer a cada cliente en contexto Los tres imperativos de una nueva profesion de Customer Engagement
    18. 18. IBM Institute for Business Value CVCV Some C-suite relationships matter more than others CEO CIO CMO CEO CFO CMO CEO CFO CHRO CEO-CIO-CMO CEO-CFO-CMO CEO-CFO-CHRO 35% more outperformers 32% more outperformers 37% more outperformers
    19. 19. IBM Institute for Business Value CEOs say the ability to collaborate across the board is the most important attribute for success 50% Collaboration Collegiality, teamwork, alignment
    20. 20. IBM Institute for Business Value Each CxO can make a major contribution
    21. 21. Conoce al cliente de telefonía involucrado  62% research via social networks  84% want to order online – return to store  They trust customer reviews 12x more than company statements 28 Expects a response within 5 minutes when contacting a company via social media Is willing to trade her information for a personalized offering
    22. 22. 29
    23. 23. @namsub #marketingshake What if..
    24. 24. @namsub #marketingshake Ignite And Grow Customer Relationships Convert Digital Prospects To Loyal Customers Curate Meaningful Customer Interactions Deliver Empowering Digital Experiences Understand Your Customers Deliver Exceptional Experiences Across All Channels Maximize Sales, Profit And Shopper Loyalty Serve And Delight Your Customers Reinvent And Automate Complex B2B Sales Processes Personalize The Store Experience
    25. 25. @namsub #marketingshake Ignite And Grow Customer Relationships Convert Digital Prospects To Loyal Customers Curate Meaningful Customer Interactions Deliver Empowering Digital Experiences Understand Your Customers Deliver Exceptional Experiences Across All Channels Maximize Sales, Profit And Shopper Loyalty Serve And Delight Your Customers Reinvent And Automate Complex B2B Sales Processes Personalize The Store Experience
    26. 26. @namsub #marketingshake
    27. 27. @namsub #marketingshake 14 de Agosto 2015 14 de Agosto 2015
    28. 28. @namsub #marketingshake 14 de Agosto 2015 14 de Agosto 2015 Gracias! Jon Busman @namsub IBM Marketing Studies Ibm.biz/marketingshake Co-Create with IBM Gonzalo Luthard Gutierrez gonzalog@ar.ibm.com

    ×