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For whom, for what? Not-
yetness and challenging the
“stuff” of open education
Amy Collier | Jen Ross
Middlebury College |...
Promises of efficiency and simplicity come at a cost.
How can we resist the ‘politics of complexity reduction’?
https://pi...
critical perspectives
on openness
technologically mediated ‘openness’ is
consistently associated with democratic,
inclusive and radical ideals…. Meanwhile o...
The effectiveness of OER is frequently articulated in
terms of the ability to ‘reduce the costs associated
with reproducin...
openness is not the opposite of closed-ness, nor
is there simply a continuum between the two. ...
all forms of openness en...
openness alone
is not an
educational
virtue.
(Edwards 2015, p.255)
Not-yetness and open
education
not yet fully understood
not yet fully researched in a meaningful way
veletsianos, 2012
Lego army by Flickr user Mark Levin, reused with permission of CC-BY 2.0 license
not-yetness emerged as a
response to a do...
"Mexico/US Pacific Ocean border fence" by Tony Webster. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons.
“Borders are set up to defin...
"Playground at Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park" by Stephen Oung from Lübeck, Germany. Licensed under
CC BY 2.0 via Commons.
...
what space is there for distinctiveness, diversity, open-endedness?
how much uncertainty can this approach to openness acc...
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For whom, for what not-yetness and challenging the “stuff” of open education

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Presentation for #opened15
Please contribute questions about not-yetness in open education on this Google doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1J2qOvLf5aiWa6a5JEVvX77Vyz4lmfYssn0ceEzIAvz4/edit?usp=sharing

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For whom, for what not-yetness and challenging the “stuff” of open education

  1. 1. For whom, for what? Not- yetness and challenging the “stuff” of open education Amy Collier | Jen Ross Middlebury College | University of Edinburgh #notyetness
  2. 2. Promises of efficiency and simplicity come at a cost. How can we resist the ‘politics of complexity reduction’? https://pixabay.com/en/minimalism-simplicity-detail-white-94803/ value labor diversity pedagogy power relations academic freedom authority & authorship
  3. 3. critical perspectives on openness
  4. 4. technologically mediated ‘openness’ is consistently associated with democratic, inclusive and radical ideals…. Meanwhile other educational possibilities are positioned as conservative, exclusionary or controlling of learners or knowledge…. The risk with such polarised accounts is that education is inevitably bad, because it is and can only ever be ‘closed’. Arguably, whilst such a position may work as an ideology, it does not provide the nuance or discrimination that is needed analytically or practically to engage with education in a constructive way. (Oliver 2015, pp.366-7) https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremybrooks/3450585089
  5. 5. The effectiveness of OER is frequently articulated in terms of the ability to ‘reduce the costs associated with reproducing and maintaining online courses’ ... this emphasis on replication appears to suggest the need for uniformity, where a homogeneous population of learners benefit from identical resources. (Knox 2013, p.829) do [OERs] reproduce historically asymmetric power relations? (Olakulehin & Singh 2013, p.33)
  6. 6. openness is not the opposite of closed-ness, nor is there simply a continuum between the two. ... all forms of openness entail forms of closed- ness. ...An important question therefore becomes not simply whether education is more or less open, but what forms of openness are worthwhile and for whom; openness alone is not an educational virtue. (Edwards 2015, p.255)
  7. 7. openness alone is not an educational virtue. (Edwards 2015, p.255)
  8. 8. Not-yetness and open education
  9. 9. not yet fully understood not yet fully researched in a meaningful way veletsianos, 2012
  10. 10. Lego army by Flickr user Mark Levin, reused with permission of CC-BY 2.0 license not-yetness emerged as a response to a dominant discourse of technology in education that has been characterised by rhetoric of control, efficiency and enhancement, underplaying more ‘disruptive, disturbing and generative dimensions’ (Bayne, 2014, p.3)
  11. 11. "Mexico/US Pacific Ocean border fence" by Tony Webster. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons. “Borders are set up to define the spaces that are safe and unsafe, to distinguish us from them...A borderland is a vague undetermined place created by the residue of an unnatural boundary.” Gloria Anzaldua, Borderlands / La Frontera
  12. 12. "Playground at Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park" by Stephen Oung from Lübeck, Germany. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons. diversity and context emergence and open-endedness authority and authorship risk-taking and encounters
  13. 13. what space is there for distinctiveness, diversity, open-endedness? how much uncertainty can this approach to openness accommodate? what closures come along with this? what is in the borderlands?

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