Linking Reading to Writing<br />Writing for Sociology Workshop<br />
Social Sciences <br />Looking at the personal and human with scientific detachment.  <br />Sociological writing can move b...
The sociological imaginationTrain yourself to look at things in a new way.<br />When I became a teenager, everything chang...
Distancing – the first step<br />As I grew into a teenager, my sense of self developed and changed.<br />My yearly summer ...
Using your reading to write<br />Individual identity is derived from social structure.<br />When I became a teenager, ever...
Your Sociological Voice<br />Combine your reading with your writing<br />THEORY FIRST method  <br />TOPIC SENTENCES<br />O...
Introduce -Elaborate – Show - Close<br />When a child becomes a teenager, their identity develops.<br />X’s account of the...
Writing task: SELF and the GROUP<br />Think of a time when you changed your behaviour to conform to expectations of others...
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Linking reading to writing

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  • Academic Literacy compared with everyday literacy – make the comparisonsWrite yourself into the position of expert – reading as informing yourself of the dialogueWriting as entering the the discourse.
  • Physical sciences- experimentation and objective knowledge – real world that exists independentlyHumanities – human relations, invested with meaning, not a reality that exists independently, seen through our observations already invested with meaningEg. What is ‘good’?Sociology wants to define the laws (objectively) about human social life – problem is that it isn’t the natural world – it’s a value-laden, interpreted world already.Some writing is more or less moving between these two poles. Close up or distant, like a scientist.
  • Reading – active reading is bringing your own knowledge and questions to the text.
  • Linking reading to writing

    1. 1. Linking Reading to Writing<br />Writing for Sociology Workshop<br />
    2. 2. Social Sciences <br />Looking at the personal and human with scientific detachment. <br />Sociological writing can move between these two poles.<br />Close up or distant, like a scientist. <br />
    3. 3. The sociological imaginationTrain yourself to look at things in a new way.<br />When I became a teenager, everything changed. The summer trip to the beach every year was a break from my friendship group. That meant being with just my family which sometimes made me feel nervous, like I was missing out on something. I even missed school.<br />Peer groups <br />Socialisation<br />Identity – sense of self<br />Employment patterns <br />Cultural habits - recreation<br />Schooling<br />Trips to the beach<br />Sociological imagination<br />
    4. 4. Distancing – the first step<br />As I grew into a teenager, my sense of self developed and changed.<br />My yearly summer trip to the beach <br />is an example of<br />the changing focus in the formation of identity.<br />At this age, I identified more with a school setting and peers <br />rather than with family.<br />In this light, the trip away was a break from my friendship group, <br />which sometimes created anxiety.<br />
    5. 5. Using your reading to write<br />Individual identity is derived from social structure.<br />When I became a teenager, everything changed. The summer trip to the beach every year was a break from my friendship group. That meant being with just my family which sometimes made me feel nervous, like I was missing out on something. I even missed school.<br />Identity - Your reading P. 105<br />Identity - Your text (voice)<br />
    6. 6. Your Sociological Voice<br />Combine your reading with your writing<br />THEORY FIRST method <br />TOPIC SENTENCES<br />One of classical sociology’s core claims <br />is that<br />individual identity is derived from social structure<br />(Bessant & Watts 1999, p. 105)<br />.<br />
    7. 7. Introduce -Elaborate – Show - Close<br />When a child becomes a teenager, their identity develops.<br />X’s account of their yearly summer trip to the beach is an example of<br /> the changing focus in the formation of identity.<br />At this age, X identifies more with a school setting and peers <br />rather than with family<br />to the extent that <br />a break from their friendship group <br />created anxiety.<br />Peers and school become more important in creating identity as we grow into young adults. <br />
    8. 8. Writing task: SELF and the GROUP<br />Think of a time when you changed your behaviour to conform to expectations of others. <br />Describe the situation in detail. How old were you? What type of group was it? How did you feel at the time? What was the result?<br />Re-write your text using the FIRST STEP – the sociological imagination.<br />Writing Topic (60 minutes)<br />

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