Children Behind the Label

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A presentation on autistic children's artwork created through an assignment for the MA in Art Ed grad program at Moore College of Art & Design.

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Children Behind the Label

  1. 1. “I’ve
come
to
the
frightening
conclusion
that
I
 am
the
decisive
element
in
the
classroom.

It’s
 my
daily
mood
that
makes
the
weather.
As
a
 teacher,
I
possess
a
tremendous
power
to
 make
a
child’s
life
miserable
or
joyous.
I
can
be
 a
tool
of
torture
or
an
instrument
of
 inspira?on.
I
can
humiliate
or
humor,
hurt
or
 heal.
In
all
situa?ons,
it
is
my
response
that
 decides
whether
a
crisis
will
be
escalated
or
 de‐escalated
and
a
child
humanized
or
de‐ humanized.”

























































Haim
GinoE

  2. 2. The
Children
Behind
the
Label

  3. 3. 









The
children
are
not
the
disability.

  4. 4. 









The
children
are
not
the
disability.
They
are
 MORE
than
the
label.
They
are
not
all
alike.


  5. 5. •  They
all
eat,
breath,
have
feelings
and
are
 human.
•  And
someone
loves
them.

  6. 6. Individuals
with
disabili?es
as
 defined
by
the
State: 
•  Children
who
has
a
physical,
mental,
or
 emo?onal
disability,
which
includes
•  Orthopedic
impairment
•  Speech
or
language
impairment
•  Au?sm
•  Trauma?c
brain
injury
•  Visual
and
hearing
impairments
•  Physical
and
health
related
challenges

  7. 7. •  Emo?onal
and
behavioral
disorders
•  Mental
retarda?on
•  Visual
impairment
including
blindness
•  A
specific
learning
disability
•  Deaf‐blindness
•  Mul?ple
disabili?es

  8. 8. AUTISM:
life
long
neurological
disorder,
 which
can
manifest
itself
by
severe
delays
 in
the
following:
Communica?ons










Social
Interac?on
Academic
skills













Motor
development






The
causes
are
linked
to
biological
or
 neurological
differences
in
the
brain.
There

 is
an
gene?c
link
but
no
one
gene
has
been
 iden?fied,
as
of
yet.

  9. 9. Characteris?cs
&/or
Difficul?es
 
Developmental
and
communica?on
delay












BEHAVIOR
IS
COMMUNICATION
 
Delayed
speech
or
non‐communica?ve
 –  Echolalic
 Visual,
motor
and/or
processing
problems
resul?ng
 in
no
eye
contact
 Touch
or
closeness
may
be
painful
resul?ng
in
 withdrawal

  10. 10. •  Anxiety,
fear
and
confusion
may
occur
•  Use
peripheral
vision
•  Sensory
overload
may
be
result
in
screaming,
 s?mming
•  Repe??ve
ac?ons
•  Lack
of
imagina?on
•  Interprets
language
literally

  11. 11. •  Difficulty
reading
body
language,
facial
 expressions
•  Uneven
skill
development
•  Logical
arguments
don’t
work
•  Rote
memory
•  Repeated
body
mo?ons
•  AEachment
to
objects

  12. 12. •  Difficulty
reading
body
language,
facial
 expressions
•  Uneven
skill
development
•  Logical
arguments
don’t
work
•  Rote
memory
•  Repeated
body
mo?ons
•  AEachment
to
objects

  13. 13. •  Inappropriate
social
skills
and
behavior
•  Increase
in
nega?vity
may
signify
an
increase
 in
stress
•  Extremely

sensi?ve
•  Resistance
to
change

  14. 14. •  Meltdown
vs.
Tantrum
 –  Meltdown
is
when
the
behavior
is
beyond
the
 child’s
control
 –  Tantrum
is
a
manipula?ve
behavior
in
order
for
the
 child
to
get
control
•  Don’t
impose
a
correc?on
or
discipline
when
 the
child
is
angry
or
over
s?mulated.
 •  Child
will
react
to
the
quality
of
your
voice
rather
than
 the
actual
words

  15. 15. •  Encourage
the
child.
•  CHOICES
•  Can
sense
far
more
than
can
communicate
•  Have
a
YOU
CAN
DO
IT
a]tude.

  16. 16. ART
PROJECTS
•  Adapt
•  Adapt
•  Adapt
•  and
then
adapt
some
more
•  KNOW
YOUR
STUDENTS

  17. 17. When I heard I had Asperger SyndromeI was very pleased because I waswondering why everyone else seemedto be acting strangely. So I felt a bitrelieved. Kenneth Hall age 8
  18. 18. INCLUSIONWhy?How?
  19. 19. TSS? (teacher support specialist)Classroom Aide?
  20. 20. Life Skills SupportTrainable Mentally Retarded
  21. 21. Staying Focused Working with Students with Learning Disabilities (LD) andAttention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  22. 22. Learning Disabilities are problems that affectthe brain’s ability to receive, process, analyzeor store information. 

  23. 23. Learning Disabilities are problems thataffect the brain’s ability to receive, process,analyze or store information. 

  24. 24. •  Different kinds of disabilities – some can interfere with a person’s ability to concentrate and cause one’s mind to wonder.•  Others can make it difficult for one to listen, speak, reason, read, spell, solve math problems or organize information.

  25. 25. Children get stuck in a failure cycle. If at first you don’t succeed, you don’t succeed.
  26. 26. •  Throw away sarcasm is damaging to a child.

  27. 27. Throw away sarcasm is damaging to a child.
•  anxiety
affects
performance
•  LD
child
has
difficulty
in
processing
 informa?on

  28. 28. •  anxiety
effects
performance
•  LD
child
has
difficulty
in
processing
 informa?on
•  it
is
said
that
LD
child
can’t
focus
–
HA!

  29. 29. Throw away sarcasm is so damaging to the child.
•  anxiety
effects
performance
•  LD
child
has
difficulty
in
processing
 informa?on
•  it
is
said
that
LD
child
can’t
focus
–
HA!
•  LD
child
needs
TIME.

  30. 30. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span

  31. 31. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span
•  easily
distracted

  32. 32. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span
•  easily
distracted
•  thoughts
are
acted
upon
without
processing

  33. 33. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span
•  easily
distracted
•  thoughts
are
acted
upon
without
processing
•  difficulty
in
concentra?ng

  34. 34. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span
•  easily
distracted
•  thoughts
are
acted
upon
without
processing
•  difficulty
in
concentra?ng
•  failure
to
complete
tasks

  35. 35. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span
•  easily
distracted
•  thoughts
are
acted
upon
without
processing
•  difficulty
in
concentra?ng
•  failure
to
complete
tasks
•  mood
swings

  36. 36. Some of the characteristics of A.D.D. children are:•  short
aEen?on
span
•  easily
distracted
•  thoughts
are
acted
upon
without
processing
•  difficulty
in
concentra?ng
•  failure
to
complete
tasks
•  mood
swings
•  high
pain
tolerance
•  average
intelligence
–
poor
performance

  37. 37. TEACHING STRATEGIES
  38. 38. TEACHING STRATEGIES•  teacher
shares
the
responsibility
with
the
child
 to
make
sure
he/she
is
organized

  39. 39. TEACHING STRATEGIES•  teacher
shares
the
responsibility
with
the
child
 to
make
sure
he/she
is
organized
•  limit
the
number
of
auditory
and
visual
 distrac?ons
•  use
isola?on
sparingly

  40. 40. TEACHING STRATEGIES•  teacher
shares
the
responsibility
with
the
child
 to
make
sure
he/she
is
organized
•  limit
the
number
of
auditory
and
visual
 distrac?ons
•  use
isola?on
sparingly
•  teach
work
skills

  41. 41. TEACHING STRATEGIES•  teacher
shares
the
responsibility
with
the
child
 to
make
sure
he/she
is
organized
•  limit
the
number
of
auditory
and
visual
 distrac?ons
•  use
isola?on
sparingly
•  teach
work
skills
•  cope
with
poor
fine
motor
skills

  42. 42. TEACHING STRATEGIES•  teacher
shares
the
responsibility
with
the
child
to
 make
sure
he/she
is
organized
•  limit
the
number
of
auditory
and
visual
 distrac?ons
•  use
isola?on
sparingly
•  teach
work
skills
•  cope
with
poor
fine
motor
skills
•  reward
on‐task
and
pro‐social
behavior
 immediately

and
ocen.

  43. 43. AND
MORE
•  don’t
argue
with
a
child
•  have
preset
consequences
•  be
consistent
•  avoid
ridicule
•  know
what
behavior
to
ignore
•  begin
each
lesson
with
a
review
of
the
last
•  use
differen?ated
instruc?on

  44. 44. •  reward
more
than
you
punish

  45. 45. •  reward
more
than
you
punish
•  change
rewards
frequently
•  terms
such
as
bad
and
good
should
be
avoided

  46. 46. •  reward
more
than
you
punish
•  change
rewards
frequently
•  terms
such
as
bad
and
good
should
be
avoided
•  check
on‐task
work

  47. 47. Reinforce the behavior you do want:•  politeness•  completed work•  paying attention•  responsible behavior•  success is the BEST motivator•  follow negative behavior with an immediate and brief reprimand
  48. 48. Emphasize critical parts of instruction.
  49. 49. •  call
on
child
when
they
are
paying
aEen?on

  50. 50. •  call
on
child
when
they
are
paying
aEen?on
•  secret
signal

  51. 51. •  call
on
child
when
they
are
paying
aEen?on
•  child
performs
best
with
a
mix
of
verbal
and
 visual
instruc?ons

  52. 52. •  call
on
child
when
they
are
paying
aEen?on
•  child
performs
best
with
a
mix
of
verbal
and
 visual
instruc?ons
•  child
learns
best
by
doing

  53. 53. •  call
on
child
when
they
are
paying
aEen?on
•  child
performs
best
with
a
mix
of
verbal
and
 visual
instruc?ons
•  child
learns
best
by
doing

  54. 54. •  call
on
child
when
they
are
paying
aEen?on
•  child
performs
best
with
a
mix
of
verbal
and
 visual
instruc?ons
•  child
learns
best
by
doing
•  choose
your
baEles

  55. 55. Patience.
  56. 56. Stay positive.
  57. 57. Tactics that DON’T work - sametactics that don’t work with the regular ed student.
  58. 58. Empty threats, shouting, lecturing
  59. 59. Empty threats, shouting, lecturing•  generalizing:
you
always
do…….

  60. 60. Empty threats, shouting, lecturing•  generalizing:
you
always
do…….
•  refer
to
odd
behavior

  61. 61. Empty threats, shouting, lecturing•  generalizing:
you
always
do…….
•  refer
to
odd
behavior
•  sarcasm

  62. 62. Empty threats, shouting, lecturing•  generalizing:
you
always
do…….
•  refer
to
odd
behavior
•  sarcasm
•  punishment
that
doesn’t
fit
the
crime

  63. 63. Empty threats, shouting, lecturing•  generalizing:
you
always
do…….
•  refer
to
odd
behavior
•  sarcasm
•  punishment
that
doesn’t
fit
the
crime
•  ge]ng
angry

  64. 64. POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT CHANGES BEHAVIOR


Nega?ve
reinforcement
only
stops
behavior
–


























doesn’t
change
it.

  65. 65. “No Easy Answers”
  66. 66. “Teachers have a profound influenceon children’s lives. It is an awesome privilege and an equally challenging responsibility. I urge you toacknowledge your power and to use it wisely.” Dr. Edna Copeland, clinical psychologist.

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