Optimizing Backhaul for Picocells in 4G Networks<br />Amir Makleff<br />President and CEO<br />BridgeWave Communications<b...
Cell Size Evolution<br /><ul><li>Distances and bit rates are still being debated
The general trend of higher bit rates/shorter distances is widely recognized</li></ul>2<br />© BridgeWave Communications	 ...
Small Cell Drivers<br /><ul><li>Macro Network Holes
Network holes between Macro Base Stations, originate from geography, building layout or legacy network planning
These “holes” yield slow data rates and dropped calls
Solution:
Pinpoint deployment of picocells in the middle of the Macro holes, to light up hard to reach strategic locations.  </li></...
Large number of nodes to achieve coverage
Different types of nodes in a variety of locations:
In buildings
Roof tops
Street-level
Light or utility poles
High capacity
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Bridge wave 4gwe-miami_02feb(3)

  1. 1. Optimizing Backhaul for Picocells in 4G Networks<br />Amir Makleff<br />President and CEO<br />BridgeWave Communications<br />
  2. 2. Cell Size Evolution<br /><ul><li>Distances and bit rates are still being debated
  3. 3. The general trend of higher bit rates/shorter distances is widely recognized</li></ul>2<br />© BridgeWave Communications www.bridgewave.com | 1-866-577-6908<br />2<br />
  4. 4. Small Cell Drivers<br /><ul><li>Macro Network Holes
  5. 5. Network holes between Macro Base Stations, originate from geography, building layout or legacy network planning
  6. 6. These “holes” yield slow data rates and dropped calls
  7. 7. Solution:
  8. 8. Pinpoint deployment of picocells in the middle of the Macro holes, to light up hard to reach strategic locations. </li></li></ul><li>Small Cell Backhaul Challenges<br /><ul><li>Dense urban areas
  9. 9. Large number of nodes to achieve coverage
  10. 10. Different types of nodes in a variety of locations:
  11. 11. In buildings
  12. 12. Roof tops
  13. 13. Street-level
  14. 14. Light or utility poles
  15. 15. High capacity
  16. 16. Propagation in urban canyons
  17. 17. Aesthetic fit (inconspicuous)
  18. 18. Cost-effective</li></li></ul><li>Small Cell Backhaul Requirements<br /><ul><li>Low cost of equipment + installation
  19. 19. Low Opex/recurrent fees (e.g. license)
  20. 20. Small deployed footprint
  21. 21. Aesthetic fit in urban environments
  22. 22. Bit rates expandable up to 1 Gbps
  23. 23. To support mesh and daisy chaining
  24. 24. Short deployment lead time</li></ul>5<br />© BridgeWave Communications www.bridgewave.com | 1-866-577-6908<br />5<br />
  25. 25. Millimeter Wave Backhaul<br /><ul><li>Point-to-point millimeter wave radios have some unique advantages for mobile backhaul:
  26. 26. Abundance of spectrum
  27. 27. High capacities
  28. 28. Attractive licensing & highly-directive transmission
  29. 29. Natural immunity to interference
  30. 30. High frequency reuse
  31. 31. Minimal frequency planning
  32. 32. Short wavelength
  33. 33. Small size of hardware and integrated solutions
  34. 34. Quick deployment
  35. 35. Low CapEx / OpEx</li></li></ul><li>mmW Spectrum<br /><ul><li>A relatively recent addition to fixed PTP frequencies:
  36. 36. V-band (“60GHz”) 7GHz (57-64GHz)
  37. 37. Unlicensed (e.g., USA, UK)
  38. 38. E-band (“80GHz”) 10GHz (71-76GHz and 81-86GHz)
  39. 39. Light-licensing (e.g., USA, UK)
  40. 40. Full licensing (e.g., Germany, Ireland)</li></li></ul><li>mmW Propagation<br /><ul><li>60GHz:
  41. 41. Absorption of O2 ~14dB/Km
  42. 42. Also rain
  43. 43. 1-2Km for 1Gbps links @5’9s
  44. 44. 80GHz:
  45. 45. Rain
  46. 46. 2-4Km for 1Gbps links @5’9s
  47. 47. Neither is impacted by:
  48. 48. Multipath fading due to narrow beams and relatively short links
  49. 49. Fog (<0.4dB/Km)</li></ul>60 GHz<br />Excessive rain150mm/h<br />Heavy rain25mm/h<br />Fog<br />Drizzle0.25mm/h<br />80 GHz<br />
  50. 50. mmW Directivity<br /><ul><li>High gain and narrow beam-width achieved with small antennas
  51. 51. Typical examples:
  52. 52. Implications:
  53. 53. Security
  54. 54. Low probability of detection (LPD)
  55. 55. Low probability of intercept (LPI)
  56. 56. High interference immunity
  57. 57. High frequency reuse
  58. 58. “No” multipath</li></ul>5.8 GHz = 1,140’ wide @ 1 mi<br />60 GHz = 128’ wide @ 1 mi<br />
  59. 59. mmW Frequency Reuse<br /><ul><li>Frequency reuse facilitated by:
  60. 60. Narrow beam width
  61. 61. Oxygen absorption at 60GHz.
  62. 62. At 60GHz, an infinite linear cascading of links may be achieved using only one pair of FDD frequencies and 2 polarizations:
  63. 63. E.g., d=300m -> u=1500m -> CCI -20dB</li></li></ul><li>The Aesthetics Challenge<br /><ul><li>Traditional direct mount and parabolic antennas are OK for rooftop / mast deployment
  64. 64. Street-level deployment requires a different approach:
  65. 65. Aesthetic
  66. 66. Concealed / disguised
  67. 67. Small footprint</li></li></ul><li>Concept Testing<br /><ul><li>Tier-1 carrier field trial over several months</li></li></ul><li>mmW Backhaul for Small Cell - Revisited<br /><ul><li>Excellent scalability
  68. 68. Scalable capacity >1Gbps
  69. 69. Distance scalable from picocell to macrocell backhaul
  70. 70. Fast and simple deployment
  71. 71. Good frequency reuse
  72. 72. Good interference immunity
  73. 73. Minimal frequency planning
  74. 74. Good fit for urban environment
  75. 75. Aesthetic, “concealed” solution
  76. 76. Small footprint
  77. 77. Low Cost
  78. 78. Low Total Cost of Ownership per bps
  79. 79. Minimal OpEx and recurring fees (e.g. license)
  80. 80. Challenges
  81. 81. Limited applicability in rural environments and other long-link scenarios</li></li></ul><li>Conclusions<br />14<br /><ul><li>Small cell backhaul requires a combination of multiple solutions: “Backhaul Toolbox”
  82. 82. Including fiber, microwave, millimeter wave, etc.
  83. 83. Millimeter Wave radios offer distinct advantages for small cell backhaul:
  84. 84. High capacity links
  85. 85. Abundance of spectrum
  86. 86. Good urban fit
  87. 87. Fast and inexpensive deployment
  88. 88. 60GHz solutions ideal for small cell deployments and is a proven technology for similar applications</li></ul>© BridgeWave Communications www.bridgewave.com | 1-866-577-6908 1-408-567-6900<br />
  89. 89. Thank You<br />Amir Makleff<br />President & CEO<br />BridgeWave Communications<br />For more information:<br />White Papers: http://www.bridgewave.com/solutions/whitepapers.cfm<br />Case Studies: http://www.bridgewave.com/solutions/casestudies.cfm<br />Data Sheets: http://www.bridgewave.com/products/default.cfm<br />Sales: 1-866-577-6908Fax: 1-408-567-0775<br />sales@bridgewave.com<br />www.bridgewave.com<br />BridgeWave Communications, Inc.3350 Thomas RoadSanta Clara, CA 95054<br />BridgeWave Communications, Inc.<br />3350 Thomas Road<br />Santa Clara, CA. 95054 U.S.A.<br />Tel: +1 (408) 567-6900<br />Fax: +1 (408) 567-0775<br />www.bridgewave.com<br />

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