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Sonnet 18 ppt

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SONNET 18 by shakespeare
Analysis and themes

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Sonnet 18 ppt

  1. 1. William Shakespeare
  2. 2. Shakespeare’s sonnets were composed between 1593 and 1601, though not published until 1609. That edition, The Sonnets of Shakespeare, consists of 154 sonnets, all written in the form of three quatrains and a couplet that is now recognized as Shakespearean. The sonnets fall into two groups: sonnets 1-126, addressed to a beloved friend, a handsome and noble young man, presumably the author’s patron, and sonnets 127-152, to a malignant but fascinating “Dark Lady," who the poet loves in spite of himself. Nearly all of Shakespeare’s sonnets examine the inevitable decay of time, and the immortalization of beauty and love in poetry.
  3. 3. Shakespeare’s sonnets were composed between 1593 and 1601, though not published until 1609. That edition, The Sonnets of Shakespeare, consists of 154 sonnets, all written in the form of three quatrains and a couplet that is now recognized as Shakespearean. The sonnets fall into two groups: sonnets 1-126, addressed to a beloved friend, a handsome and noble young man, presumably the author’s patron, and sonnets 127-152, to a malignant but fascinating “Dark Lady," who the poet loves in spite of himself. Nearly all of Shakespeare’s sonnets examine the inevitable decay of time, and the immortalization of beauty and love in poetry.
  4. 4.  an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His surviving works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.
  5. 5.  Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon- Avon. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith.  Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men.  He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613 at age 49, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others.
  6. 6.  Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613.  His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the 16th century.  He then wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest works in the English language.  In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights.
  7. 7.  Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. In 1623, two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare's.  Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the 19th century.  The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called "bardolatry".
  8. 8.  In the 20th century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are constantly studied, performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world.
  9. 9. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
  10. 10. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? This question is flattering in itself as a summer’s day is often associated with beauty.
  11. 11. Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Shakespeare, however, explains that his love’s beauty exceeds that of the summer and does not have its tendency towards unpleasant extremes:
  12. 12. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: It should be noted that at the time the sonnet was written, England had not yet adopted the Gregorian calendar and May was considered a summer month. In the above quote, Shakespeare describes the fragility and short duration of summer’s beauty. The use of the word ‘lease’ reminds us of the fact that everything beautiful remains so for a limited time only and after a while its beauty will be forcibly taken away.
  13. 13. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, Shakespeare states that the sun, which he personifies and refers to as ‘the eye of heaven’, can be too hot or blocked from view by the clouds unlike his ‘more temperate’ love.
  14. 14. And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: The repetition of the word ‘fair’ highlights the fact that this fate is inescapable for everything that possesses beauty.
  15. 15. “But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st” Suddenly (though it was foreshadowed a bit in line 8), the tone and direction of the poem changes dramatically. Moving on from bashing summer and the limitations inherent in nature, the speaker pronounces that the beloved he’s speaking to isn’t subject to all of these rules he’s laid out.
  16. 16. “But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st” Shakespeare, however, states that his love will not lose their beauty to death or time but will be preserved through his poetry:
  17. 17. So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. (As long as there are humans alive on this planet Your life and beauty will live on through this sonnet) Shakespeare’s self-assured claim makes it possible to argue that the purpose of the poem was not actually to pay a beloved person a compliment but rather to praise oneself for poetic skill.
  18. 18. Speaker: The Author
  19. 19. Addressee: The young man
  20. 20. Tone: Endearing, deep devotion for a lover
  21. 21. • “The darling buds of May” – the beautiful, much loved buds of the early summer • “The eye of heaven” – Sun
  22. 22. Metaphor: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”
  23. 23. Metaphor: "Thou art more lovely and more temperate”
  24. 24. Personification: “Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May” “Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines“
  25. 25. Personification: “Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade”
  26. 26. Anaphora: “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.”
  27. 27. Iambic pentameter the most common metrical pattern in poetry written in English, alternates weak unstressed and strong stressed syllables to make a ten-syllable line (weak strong/weak strong/weak strong/weak strong/weak strong).
  28. 28. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
  29. 29.  Love  Literature and Writing  Time  Man and the Natural World
  30. 30.  Shakespeare's sonnets are a collection of 154 sonnets, dealing with themes such as the passage of time, love, beauty and mortality, first published in a 1609 quarto entitled SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS.  Never before imprinted. (although sonnets 138 and144 had previously been published in the 1599 miscellany The Passionate Pilgrim).  The quarto ends with "A Lover's Complaint", a narrative poem of 47 seven-line stanzas written in rhyme royal.

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