Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

English at Work

252 views

Published on

A proposal for investing in english language for immigrants.

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

English at Work

  1. 1. English at Work: An Investment in the Massachusetts Workforce A public-private-community solution initiated by the Mayor’s Office of New Bostonians and committed to expanding the long-term capacity to meet the demand for English classesSpecial thanks to the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Research Division
  2. 2. ESOL is a sound investment if your business or industry:• Relies on a limited English proficient (LEP) workforce• Expects job growth• Needs a prepared workforce pipeline• Requires good communications• Depends on good customer service
  3. 3. Key industries in the Metro Boston region rely on the limited English proficient (LEP) workforceSector % of total Sector as % of LEP total workforce WorkforceHospitality 19% 5%Manufacturing 17% 10%Healthcare 10% 13%Admin, Support, Waste Mgmt, 10% 3%RemediationRetail Trade 9% 10%Educational Services 5% 11%Professional, Scientific, and Technical 3% 11%Construction 4% 5%Transportation and Warehousing 3% 4%
  4. 4. Industries in MA with Currently High Job Vacancies Number of VacanciesTotal Job Vacancies in 86,296MAHealthcare 19,150Hospitality 11,030Retail Trade 10,540ManufacturingVacancy Survey 2 Quarter 2006 6,340 Source: Massachusetts Department of Workforce Development’s Massachusetts Job nd
  5. 5. Key Characteristics of Occupations by Language Skill Requirements – All Industries Proportionof Total Jobs 24% 29% 27% 15% Language Medium Medium Low HighSkill Levels Low High Average Salary $26,678 $33,732 $51,886 $68,287 Source: O*NET; Boston Redevelopment Authority and the Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University
  6. 6. Hospitality Workforce Trends Today, over half of the jobs can be accessed with low English skills. by 2014, three-fourths of projected new jobs will require at least Medium levels. English Low Medium Medium High Skill Level Low HighCurrent Jobs 57% 36% 5% New Jobs 26% 37% 31% 5% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Source: O*NET; Boston Redevelopment Authority and the Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, and the Massachusetts Dept of Unemployment Assistance
  7. 7. Healthcare Workforce TrendsToday, few jobs can be accessed with low English skills. Current trends will continue as new jobs require higher English skill levels. English Skill Medium Medium Medium Medium Level Low Low Low Low High High High High Current Jobs 6% 23% 36% 30% New Jobs 8% 22% 37% 33% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Source: O*NET; Boston Redevelopment Authority and the Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, and the Massachusetts Dept of Unemployment Assistance
  8. 8. Manufacturing Workforce Trends All projected new jobs in manufacturing will require higher English skills English Skill Medium Medium Medium Level Low Low Medium Low Low HighHigh High High Current Jobs 3 9% 27 % 2 3% 5% New Jobs -2% 20 % 3 6% 30 %- 25 % 0% 2 5% 50% 75% 1 00 % Source: O*NET; Boston Redevelopment Authority and the Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, and the Massachusetts Dept of Unemployment Assistance
  9. 9. Increasing English skills in the workforce is a challenge shared by government, businesses, labor, and communities. A shared solution requires: • Leadership • Investment • Attention to quality
  10. 10. The new Administration has the opportunity to:• Focus new and existing resources, planning, and training on the delivery of high-quality ESOL and adult education at the workplace and to working adults.• Help build system capacity to deliver high quality workplace-based ESOL.
  11. 11. For more information, contact:Claudia GreenProject Director, English for New Bostonianscgreen@miracoalition.org(617) 350-5480 ext 203
  12. 12. Notes• Occupational distribution based on national data. Occupations making up less than 0.2% of the industry employment were omitted. Occupational titles excluded from state employment projections were dropped from this analysis.• Source: O*NET; Boston Redevelopment Authority and the Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, and Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance (DUA) projections.
  13. 13. Notes on Language Skills QuartilesUsing the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), we estimated language skill requirements by occupational title. O*NEThas detailed skills descriptions for approximately 800 different occupational titles. In order to estimate language skillrequirements we selected three “language-based” variables--speaking, writing, and reading comprehension•  These variables are measured on two separate Likert scales.•  Incumbents are asked to rate how important a particular skill is in doing their current job on a 1-5 scale, as well as what levelof that skill is needed in doing their current job 1-7 scale.•  The higher the score on the scale, the more important language skills are in performing jobs tasks within the selectedoccupation•   We tested the reliability within and between each language skill.•   The results showed that occupations that were given high scores for each variable on “importance” also were given highscores on “level”. In addition, occupations given high scores on one of the language-based variables received high scores onthe other language-based variables.•   We aggregated the three “language-based” variables into one variables called---”language skills”•   Again---the higher the score on the variable, the more important language proficiency is to performing the job.•   Next, we split the language skills variable into 4 categories, or quartiles, of “skill”: Low, Medium-low, Medium-high, and High.The occupations scoring in the lowest 25% of language skill requirements were placed on the “Low” category, occupationsscoring between 26% and 50% were placed on the “Medium-low” category and so on.

×