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Green Businesses, Green Jobs & Green Economy

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Green businesses create sustainable economic growth and job opportunities for both high and lower skilled workers, while optimizing the use of natural resources by offering products or services that reduce environmental impacts

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Green Businesses, Green Jobs & Green Economy

  1. 1. Galen Nelson, GreenTech Business Manager Green Businesses Green Jobs Green Economy I. Defining Green Businesses II. Indicators, Trends & Analysis
  2. 2. I. Defining Green Businesses  Definition Challenges  Green Jobs Definition  Green Business Core Sectors  Recent Efforts to Define/Quantify Clean/Green Tech in Boston/MA
  3. 3. “Green businesses create sustainable economic growth and job opportunities for both high and lower skilled workers, while optimizing the use of natural resources by offering products or services that reduce environmental impacts.” “Green businesses add economic value over conventional business models, create healthier communities and workplaces, and reduce liability for business owners and the communities in which they operate.”
  4. 4. Definition Challenges  A “green” business definition is not established by the federal government, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or in terms of the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes  Though some sectors can be easily categorized and defined (renewable energy), what characterizes a green business often hinges on process and methods in addition to outcomes and products.  Further complicating matters, some conventional businesses may have a green product line or service (i.e., Toyota’s Prius).
  5. 5. Green Jobs Definitions  Green jobs are full time equivalents spent increasing the efficient or restorative use of natural capital or protecting life from that capital's past pollution or waste.  Green jobs are family-supporting jobs that contribute significantly to preserving or enhancing environmental quality.
  6. 6. Green Business Core Sectors  Energy Efficiency  Renewable Energy  Green Building  Waste Management  Alternative Transit (i.e., Electric Vehicle Infrastructure)
  7. 7.  Industrial processes  Nearly all businesses  Political subdivisions  Food systems  Waste management systems  Transportation systems  Energy delivery and production infrastructure  Finance, Insurance …
  8. 8. How to Define Green Businesses  Most quantitative industry analyses are based on the North American Industrial Classification Index (NAICS) codes.  This tool which focuses on products rather than process or impacts will likely not completely serve our classification needs.
  9. 9. Green Industry NAICS Codes  Renewable/Clean Energy – 237130 Alternative energy (e.g., geothermal, ocean wave, solar, wind) structure construction – 333414 Solar energy heating equipment manufacturing – 926130 Solar energy regulation – 237130 Co-generation plant construction – 237130 Solar power structure construction – 237130 Wind power structure construction  Resource Management – 221119 Power generation, electric (except fossil fuel, hydroelectric, nonhazardous solid waste, nuclear) – 562920 Removal of recyclable materials from a waste stream – 562920 Waste recovery facilities  Alternative Transit – 336991 Bicycles and parts manufacturing  Green Building – 238- Insulation
  10. 10. Recent Efforts to Define/Quantify Clean/Green Tech in Boston/MA  Massachusetts Technology Collaborative (MTC) Clean Tech Census (2007): Boston - Roughly 90 businesses, 1,000 jobs in Boston.  UMASS Lowell Clean Tech Report (2008): Recommends state provide market incentives/resources to develop 5 clean tech sectors  Northeast Recycling Council (NERC) 2009 Recycling Economic Information study: 14,000 jobs in Massachusetts
  11. 11. Proposed Definition “Green businesses create sustainable economic growth and job opportunities for both high and lower skilled workers, while optimizing the use of natural resources by offering products or services that reduce environmental impacts.”
  12. 12. II. Indicators, Trends and Analysis I Standard Industry Indicators II GreenTech Specific Indicators Sector Overview III Sub-Sectors IV Sector Trends IV Policy Market Drivers
  13. 13. Standard Industry Indicators 1. Industry’s growth – employment Location Quotient (LQ) Shift Share Analysis Additional Specific Data Needs: - Employment in Boston - total and by major subsectors – 2001-2007 and how it compares to state/nation - worker–per-establishment metric - total and by major subsectors 2. Occupations (LMAT)
  14. 14. GreenTech Specific Indicators  Cost of energy (oil, natural gas, coal)  Cost of water  State, federal regulation  Waste hauling tipping fees  Construction starts  Venture capital investment in clean tech  Patent applications  Renewable energy credit markets  Public sector policy/procurement
  15. 15. Energy Efficiency Sub-Sectors Building Retrofits EE Product Design, proto-typing, manufacturing Building Management System (software) development Building modeling software Financial instruments Trends/Developments Energy management in residential sector Market expansion rate Policy Market Drivers Building code Financing instruments for residential/commercial sectors (Renew Boston)
  16. 16. Renewable Energy  Sub-Sectors Solar (Photovoltaic, Thermal) Wind Biomass  Trends/Developments Thin Film Building Integrated PV/Design Solar financing Market consolidation  Policy Market Drivers Building code Renewable Portfolio Standard Carbon Cap and Trade Financing instruments for residential/commercial sectors (Renew Boston)
  17. 17. Green Building  Sub-Sectors Materials Design/Engineering Distribution Construction  Trends/Developments Conventional manufacturers adding green lines Broad market adoption Insurance/Finance industry on board  Policy Market Drivers Building code Zoning code (Article 37) Carbon Cap and Trade
  18. 18. Waste Management  Sub-Sectors Recycling Compostables Waste to Energy Anerobic Digestion  Trends/Developments Divergent paths: single stream vs. greater segregation  Policy Market Drivers State Solid Waste Management Planning City recycling initiatives
  19. 19. Alternative Transit  Sub-Sectors Bicycling Electric Vehicles Bike/vehicle sharing programs  Trends/Developments Electric vehicles coming on line V2G Bikeshare  Policy Market Drivers Bikeshare Carbon cap and trade
  20. 20. Barriers to Market  Clean Energy/Energy Efficiency – Capital – Market friendly policy  Green Building – Workforce training/skilled workforce – Market friendly policy  Alternative Transit – Planning/infrastructure dictates market viability – Culture
  21. 21. United States Built Environment: Environmental Impacts 12% Water Use 30% Greenhouse Gas Emissions 65% Waste Output 70% Electricity Consumption
  22. 22. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 $792 MILLION $3.24 BILLION $3.81 BILLION $5.76 BILLION $7.73 BILLION 2006 $10 BILLION $60 BILLION PROJECTED 2010 Estimated Value of LEED – New Construction (NC) Projects
  23. 23. Green Building Benefits for Boston  Help meet aggressive green house gas reduction goals  Help tackle energy management, energy cost, grid challenges  Help reduce storm water flows/increase ground water recharge capacity  Reduce urban heat island effect and related human health impacts and related expenses  Green Jobs  Grow green design and engineering sector  Help meet growing demand for green commercial interior (leased) space  Alignment with Green Affordable Housing Program
  24. 24. Renewable Energy Component Supply Demand Bottleneck
  25. 25. Galen Nelson GreenTech Business Manager galen.nelson.BRA@cityofboston.gov 617.918.4447

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