Highland Life Online Presentation (5)

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  • Information on student use of media, Information on online safety, Information on Facebook use, Information on generational differences that contribute to misunderstandings, Strategies for helping them navigate pitfalls!Information on online safety, Information on Facebook use, How computers and the internet can assist learningInformation on online safety, Information on Facebook useCyberbullying, protecting child's information online, how much privacy should a child be allowed, how to access text messages online for parental monitoring Cyberbullying, protecting child's information online, how much privacy should a child be allowed, how to access text messages online for parental monitoring
  • Speaking of bombarding... You will be bombarded with information in this presentation. Please just relax. Don’t try to remember any of it... At the end of the evening, we will provide you with a one-stop shop for information and for mutual support.
  • Highland Life Online Presentation (5)

    1. 1. Life Online Workshops<br />Demystifying Your Child’s Life Online<br />Relationship / Good Judgement / Control<br />
    2. 2. Participants tonight mostly wanted to focus on (Highest first):<br /><ul><li>Facebook and texting
    3. 3. Online Safety
    4. 4. Addictive quality of video games
    5. 5. Addictive quality of the Internet,
    6. 6. The line between protection and independence?</li></ul>Life Online Workshops<br />
    7. 7. Life Online Workshops<br />So, in this Workshop, we will:<br />Introduce ourselves (15 minutes),<br />Look at some information and data (30 - 35 Minutes)<br />Discuss issues you are facing and how some folks are dealing with it (30 - 40 Minutes),<br />Look at a model for how to deal with specific situations and the mass of information with which we are bombarded (15 minutes).<br />
    8. 8. What is happening?<br />Screen time – Video games, social networking (Facebook, texting...)<br />Why is it happening with such intensity?<br />What do young people need?<br />Why video games give young people what they need?<br />What hunger are Facebook and texting feeding in young people?<br />What can you do?<br />
    9. 9. A Common Sense Media study revealed:<br /><ul><li>85% of parents feel that the Internet poses the greatest risk to their children.
    10. 10. Concerns included:
    11. 11. Predators
    12. 12. Cyber bullying
    13. 13. Screen time
    14. 14. Pornography...</li></li></ul><li>40% of 9 – 16 year-olds report believing all or most of what they see online<br />Media Awareness Network<br />Areas of Concern from local parents:<br /><ul><li>Safety from predators and cyber bullying,
    15. 15. Pornography and strange subcultures that may draw young people,
    16. 16. What young people believe on the Internet,
    17. 17. What their children may be revealing about themselves in communications and profiles,
    18. 18. Too much screen time
    19. 19. Addictions to video games
    20. 20. Addictions to Facebook and texting.</li></li></ul><li>Areas of Concern from local parents:<br /><ul><li>Safety from predators and cyber bullying,
    21. 21. Pornography and strange subcultures that may draw young people,
    22. 22. What young people believe on the Internet,
    23. 23. What their children may be revealing about themselves in communications and profiles,
    24. 24. Too much screen time
    25. 25. Addictions to video games
    26. 26. Addictions to Facebook and texting.</li></li></ul><li>According to Media Awareness Network:<br /><ul><li>Although parents may be unhappy with their children’s virtual lives,
    27. 27. They tend to not discuss these issues with their children,
    28. 28. Parents are unaware of what their children are doing online, and
    29. 29. Parents tend to not be present when their children are online (22% not present with younger children and 74% not present with older children).</li></li></ul><li>If I ever see you on a computer again you will be grounded until 2034<br />You wait till your mom gets home!<br />What were you thinking?<br />I thought I could trust you!<br />
    30. 30. It is often difficult to know what to do <br />How much limitation and control are appropriate?<br />Block all<br />Access?<br />Won’t<br />Work<br />
    31. 31. Information is coming from everywhere<br />
    32. 32. First: Why?<br />What to do?<br />What are young people getting from video games that they need so much?<br /><ul><li>What hunger are Facebook and texting feeding in young people?
    33. 33. What do young people need?
    34. 34. Then: What can you do?</li></li></ul><li>14 year-old Johnny, who has a choice between playing a video game and writing a story...<br />Why?<br />Fun?<br />
    35. 35. Why would Johnny rather play a video game than write a story?<br />Mihály Csíkszentmihályi – Flow<br />Attributes:<br /><ul><li>Intense concentration & involvement
    36. 36. Time is distorted
    37. 37. Enjoyment &/or fulfillment
    38. 38. Clear steps and immediate feedback
    39. 39. Intrinsic motivation
    40. 40. Balance between challenge and skill</li></li></ul><li>Why would Johnny rather play a video game than write a story?<br />
    41. 41. Why would Jonny rather play a video game than write a story?<br /><ul><li>Video Games are Flow Machines
    42. 42. Many screen-based activities are designed to engender a flow experience</li></li></ul><li>Trends:<br /><ul><li>The Web will be accessible everywhere
    43. 43. Not necessarily on the computer
    44. 44. Media-centric
    45. 45. Social Media will be the largest component of the Web</li></ul>“Google no longer believes the future of the Web is on the personal computer. Instead, the company predicts most people will soon be connecting to the outside world through mobile devices.”<br />Approximately half of children have computers in their rooms<br />Google, the great disruptor, takes aim ... at everything <br />Omar El Akkad and Lain Marlow<br />From Saturday's Globe and Mail <br />Published on Friday, Jan. 08, 2010 9:32PM EST <br />Last updated on Sunday, Jan. 10, 2010 11:11AM EST <br />
    46. 46. Wikis<br />Self-Expression<br />Communication<br />Websites<br />Personal Learning Networks<br />Collaboration<br />Blogs<br />Sharing/Collaborating<br />Socializing<br />Specific Social <br />Networking Services<br />Texting<br />General Social<br />Networking Services<br />
    47. 47. Facebook<br />
    48. 48. Facebook<br />Population of Canada: 33,962,909<br />
    49. 49. First, it’s important to note that most of this data was taken from September 2009. A lot changes in social media in a five month period.<br />With that said though, the trends seem clear: teens love to be online, but they’re not terribly interested in writing blog posts or maintaining a stream of tweets. Creating content takes time and energy that they’d rather exert on Facebook ( ), texting, YouTube ( ), or other online activities. And of course, they have school and friends.<br />Let’s face it: teenagers haven’t had the time to build up expertise, life experiences, or a career that would merit content creation. Without that expertise, less people are inclined to listen to what they have to say, and without that knowledge, teenagers have less to talk about.<br />Most are connecting with high-speed connections as well. 76% of families with teenage children have broadband connections, while 10% still use dial-up, 8% have no computer, and 4% have a computer but no Internet access. For comparison, 49% of families used dial-up in 2004.<br />
    50. 50. Why?<br />A look at adolescence?<br />Many people do not view their adolescence as a comfortable time in their lives.<br />Most traditional societies did not have adolescence as we have it today.<br />Anthropologist, Arnold van Gennep, coined the term “rites of passage”, and broke them down to three rites:<br />
    51. 51. Rites of Passage<br />Liminal (Limbo)<br /><ul><li> A ritual,
    52. 52. A journey...</li></ul>Childhood<br />Adulthood<br />Separation<br />Incorporation<br />
    53. 53. Adolescence<br />Waiting, learning, training, preparing, and experimenting with responsibility without claiming the privileges of adulthood…<br />…takes a long time.<br />Childhood<br />Adulthood<br />Liminal<br />The rite of passage<br />
    54. 54. Adolescence<br />According to Erik Erikson, the adolescent stage is one of crisis/opportunity around developing a sense of identity.<br />Without a strong sense of identity, a person is left with role confusion, and is perhaps not ready for the crisis/opportunity required to develop intimacy.<br />
    55. 55. Adolescence<br /><ul><li>Erik Erikson</li></ul>According to Erik Erikson, the adolescent stage is one of crisis/ opportunity around developing a sense of identity.<br /><ul><li>Some late teens: Intimacy vs. Isolation</li></li></ul><li>
    56. 56. Attachment<br />“(O)ur children need to be attached psychologically to us until they are capable of standing on their own two feet, able to think for themselves and to determine their own direction.”<br />Neufeld , G. (2004). Hold on to your kids. why parents matter. 1st ed. Toronto, ON: Alfred A, Knopf Canada. <br />“A parent is by far a child’s best compass point.”<br />
    57. 57. Attachment<br />At what point do our children have the life experience and developmental critical thinking capacity to deal with the tough decisions?<br />At what point can they be their own best compass for decision-making?<br />
    58. 58. Attachment<br />“(P)eers... become (a) child's working compass point.Peers…become the arbiters of what is good, what is happening, what is important and even how the child defines who she is..”<br />Peer Attachment<br />Neufeld , G. (2004). Hold on to your kids. why parents matter. 1st ed. Toronto, ON: Alfred A, Knopf Canada. <br />
    59. 59. Why Bring up Identity <br />seeking and Peer Attachment?<br /><ul><li>We have a society where rites of passage and future directions are not clear to young people, giving a lot of time to wait and explore identity.
    60. 60. Identity is a powerful draw for adolescents.
    61. 61. Peer attached teens rely mostly on peers for a sense of identity.</li></li></ul><li>Why Bring up Identity <br />seeking and Peer Attachment?<br /><ul><li>Facebook and texting are peer attachment machines.
    62. 62. It is important to the model (or filter) that we going to recommend to you for deciding on what actions to take with your child. (More on that after a discussion)</li></li></ul><li>Why is it happening with such intensity?<br />What do young people need?<br />Flow,<br />Identity,<br />Attachment.<br />Why video games give young people what they need?<br />Flow<br />What hunger are Facebook and texting feeding in young people?<br />Peer attachment, <br />identity.<br />What can you do?<br />
    63. 63. Generation Mini-Gaps<br /><ul><li>Researchers... theorize that the ever-accelerating pace of technological change may be minting a series of mini-generation gaps, with each group of children uniquely influenced by the tech tools available in their formative stages of development.
    64. 64. “People two, three or four years apart are having completely different experiences with technology,” said Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. “College students scratch their heads at what their high school siblings are doing, and they scratch their heads at their younger siblings. It has sped up generational differences.” </li></ul>The Children of Cyberspace: Old Fogies by Their 20s<br />By BRAD STONE<br />The New York Times<br />Published: January 9, 2010<br />
    65. 65. A Possible Filter: What to Focus On:<br />If your child is younger or still adult-attached<br />More time <br />& attention<br />Less time <br />& attention<br />If your child is older or is becoming peer-attached<br />

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