Never work harder than your students

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Never work harder than your students

  1. 1. Never Work Harder Than Your Students by Robyn R. JacksonChapter 1 1. Why is learning demographic information about your students not enough to help you really get to know them and learn how to reach them? 2. What other information do you also need and how do you go about getting it? 3. How can you determine what currencies your students have already? 4. What tacit knowledge or soft skills do students need in order to be successful in your classroom? 5. What currencies are you currently accepting in your classroom? What currencies are you spending and what currencies are students spending? Is there a disconnect? 6. What, in your estimation, constitutes a "good" student? 7. Which of the eight noncognitive indicators of academic success is most important to you? Why? 8. Which of the eight noncognitives do your students seem to be missing? How can you help them acquire these characteristics and skills? 9. What are the various "codes" your students already use? How can you help them learn to "code switch"? 10. How can you tell whether a lacks the required currency or has the currency but refuses to spend it? 11. What strategies can you use to convince students to spend their currencies in your classroom? 12. How can you begin to apply the principle if you are a novice, apprentice, practitioner, or master teacher?Chapter 2 1. What is the difference between a content goal and a process goal? Why is it important to know the difference? 2. What are three ways to make your learning goals more concrete and why is doing so important? 3. Why should you set your standards in terms of minimum versus maximum performance? 4. What does your assessment task and criteria for success say about your objectives? 5. What happens when students face a series of activities with no clear learning goal? 6. What three things communicate your real learning goals more than your stated objective?
  2. 2. 7. How can you communicate your learning goals more effectively? 8. How can you begin to apply the principle if you are a novice, apprentice, practitioner, or master teacher?Chapter 3 1. What is the difference between high expectations and high standards? 2. According to the expectations equation, how do you raise your expectations? Which side of the expectations equation is most difficult for you to adjust—values or beliefs? 3. How do your expectations of your own teaching skill manifest in the way that you teach? 4. Why is optimism dangerous? 5. What is the Stockdale Paradox and how does it lead to higher expectations? 6. What is the connection between your values and your ability to maintain unwavering faith? 7. What is the connection between your beliefs and your ability to confront the brutal facts of your reality? 8. What can you do to balance both sides of the expectations equation in your own teaching situation? 9. How can you begin to apply the principle if you are a novice, apprentice, practitioner, or master teacher?

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