Optimising FEV BIW Architecturefrom a Styling EnvelopeJesper ChristensenCoventry University, UK
Agenda• Introduction• Purpose & proposed methodology• Topology optimisation    •   Lessons learnt    •   Crash structure a...
Introduction•   Low Carbon Vehicle Technology Project, ongoing TARF•   £29 million research project• Project partners:    ...
Purpose & proposed methodology• Define a methodology for developing a lightweight architecture• Requirements:    •   Vehic...
Topology optimisation                        1. CAD model (design envelope)                          2. Topology optimisat...
Topology optimisation                                                        1. CAD model (design envelope)               ...
Topology   Shape- & size optimisation                                        1. CAD model (design envelope)               ...
Shape- & size optimisation                             1. CAD model (design envelope)                                2. To...
Shape- & size optimisation                                  1. CAD model (design envelope)                                ...
BIW draft                                      1. CAD model (design envelope)                                         2. T...
Conclusion and future steps                                                      1.CAD model (design envelope)Conclusions:...
Conclusion and future steps                                                      1.CAD model (design envelope)Conclusions:...
Conclusion and future steps                                                        1.CAD model (design envelope)Conclusion...
Thank you for your attention – any questions?                         Jesper Christensen                         Lecturer ...
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Optimising Full Electric Vehicle Body In White Architecture from a Styling Envelope

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This paper proposes an engineering process for optimising new Full Electrical Vehicle (FEV) lightweight vehicle architecture based upon OptiStruct topology optimisation, extracting the idealised load paths for a given set of load cases. Subsequently, shape and size optimisations (HyperStudy) are conducted in order to obtain detailed information of localised vehicle geometry, including automated 2D mesh generation from 1D beam models. The research discusses each individual step of the overall process including successes, limitations, and further engineering challenges and complications which will need to be resolved in order to automate the vehicle architecture design to include durability and (dynamic) crashworthiness performance.

Published in: Technology

Optimising Full Electric Vehicle Body In White Architecture from a Styling Envelope

  1. 1. Optimising FEV BIW Architecturefrom a Styling EnvelopeJesper ChristensenCoventry University, UK
  2. 2. Agenda• Introduction• Purpose & proposed methodology• Topology optimisation • Lessons learnt • Crash structure and safety cell • “Automation”• Shape & size optimisation • Crash structure development • Safety cell development • “Automation”• Conclusion and future steps
  3. 3. Introduction• Low Carbon Vehicle Technology Project, ongoing TARF• £29 million research project• Project partners: Define a methodology for developing a lightweight vehicle architecture (BIW)
  4. 4. Purpose & proposed methodology• Define a methodology for developing a lightweight architecture• Requirements: • Vehicle may be Fully Electric (FE) or Hybrid Electric (HE)• How? • “Conventional” BIW development • Optimising “pre-existing” BIW 1.CAD model (design envelope) • Blank sheet use optimisation 2.Topology optimisation Overall aims: 3.Shape- & size optimisation Minimise BIW mass Meet safety requirements 4.BIW draft
  5. 5. Topology optimisation 1. CAD model (design envelope) 2. Topology optimisation 3. Shape- & size optimisation 4. BIW draft
  6. 6. Topology optimisation 1. CAD model (design envelope) 2. Topology optimisation 3. Shape- & size optimisation 4. BIW draft 15-20 minutes / model 30 seconds / model GUI – “Automatic” topology optimisation setup - tcl Barrier Wheel and Auxiliary ConstraintsCreation suspension components
  7. 7. Topology Shape- & size optimisation 1. CAD model (design envelope) 2. Topology optimisation 3. Shape- & size optimisation 4. BIW draft Safety cell
  8. 8. Shape- & size optimisation 1. CAD model (design envelope) 2. Topology optimisation 3. Shape- & size optimisation 4. BIW draft
  9. 9. Shape- & size optimisation 1. CAD model (design envelope) 2. Topology optimisation 3. Shape- & size optimisation 4. BIW draft Crash structure `
  10. 10. BIW draft 1. CAD model (design envelope) 2. Topology optimisation 3. Shape- & size optimisation 4. BIW draft Crash structure Safety cell BIW draft
  11. 11. Conclusion and future steps 1.CAD model (design envelope)Conclusions: Good for (rapid) initial BIW load path estimations 2.Topology optimisation Good for safety cell development Inertia Relief Limitations of linear elastic software 3.Shape- & size optimisation Interpretations of results are vital HM tcl scripting enables rapid model setup 4.BIW draftFuture steps: Non-linear topology optimisation (ESLM?) Joint modelling (multiple materials) Increased consideration of manufacturing constraints Consideration of shape- and size opt. within topology opt. Combined linear and non-linear topology optimisation
  12. 12. Conclusion and future steps 1.CAD model (design envelope)Conclusions: Interpretations of results are vital 2.Topology optimisation 3.Shape- & size optimisation 4.BIW draftFuture steps: “Automatic” / mathematical extraction of results CAD model
  13. 13. Conclusion and future steps 1.CAD model (design envelope)Conclusions: Excellent for lightweight crash structure development 2.Topology optimisation Robust, stable and efficient response surfaces Excellent coupling with Dynamic modelling Excellent sampling point options 3.Shape- & size optimisation 4.BIW draftFuture steps: “Automation” / template building (as topology setup) “Direct link” with topology optimisation
  14. 14. Thank you for your attention – any questions? Jesper Christensen Lecturer in Stress Analysis aa8867@coventry.ac.uk Christophe Bastien Principal Lecturer Automotive Engineering aa3425@coventry.ac.uk Mike V Blundell Professor of Vehicle Dynamics & Impact cex403@coventry.ac.uk

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