Art Appreciation-Chapter16

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  • Photograph: Alinori/Art Resource, NY.
  • Photograph: Copyright Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence. Photograph: Copyright Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy. Photograph: Copyright Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • The Royal Collection © 2009 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Photograph: EZM. RL19102r.
  • Musée du Louvre, Paris, France. Photograph: Copyright Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • Photograph: Copyright Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • Credit
  • Credit
  • Accademia, Florence. Photograph: Duane Preble.
  • Vatican Museums, Rome, Italy.
  • Vatican Museums, Rome, Italy. © Reuters NewMedia Inc./Corbis.
  • Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Art Resource, NY.
  • National Gallery, London, U.K. Photograph: Bridgeman Art Library.
  • Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria.
  • Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome, Italy. Photograph: Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • Galleria Borghese, Rome/Canali PhotoBank, Milan/SuperStock.
  • Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy. Photograph: Scala/Art Resource, NY.
  • Onze Lieve Vrouwkerk, Antwerp Cathedral, Belgium. Photograph: Peter Willi/Bridgeman Art Library International Ltd.
  • Museo del Prado, Madrid, Spain. Photograph: Erich Lessing/Art Resource, NY.
  • Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.
  • Chateau de Versailles et de Trianon, Versailles, France. Photograph: Copyright Giraudon/Art Resource, NY.
  • Photograph: Hirmer Fotoarchiv, Munich, Germany.
  • Art Appreciation-Chapter16

    1. 1. Renaissance and Baroque Europe Chapter 16
    2. 2. Renaissance <ul><li>Renaissance-”rebirth” </li></ul><ul><li>Science was a major influence </li></ul><ul><li>Accuracy and naturalism were valued </li></ul><ul><li>A revived interest in the art and ideas of classical Greece and Rome </li></ul><ul><li>Major Renaissance ideas stemmed from Italy </li></ul>
    3. 3. Giotto di Bondone. Lamentation . Scrovegni Chapel, Padua, Italy. c. 1305. 72&quot; × 78&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    4. 4. Lamentation by Giotto <ul><li>Departed from the abstract Byzantine style </li></ul><ul><li>Giotto began to show mass, space, and light in a more naturalistic way </li></ul><ul><li>The scene is very stage-like and shallow in terms of space </li></ul><ul><li>He takes pains to portray the emotion and the grief of the scene </li></ul>
    5. 5. Masaccio. The Holy Trinity . Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Italy. 1425. 21'10-1/2&quot; × 10'5&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    6. 6. The Holy Trinity by Masaccio <ul><li>Considered to be the first painting made using linear perspective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Filippo Brunelleschi is considered the “inventor” of linear perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The trinity is represented here </li></ul><ul><ul><li>God the father as a seated figure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Christ the son on the cross </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Holy Spirit as a white dove </li></ul></ul><ul><li>On either side of the cross stand Mary and St. John </li></ul><ul><li>Kneeling on the outside are the donors that paid for the painting </li></ul><ul><li>Masaccio’s figures have lifelike presence and realistic folds in their clothing </li></ul>
    7. 7. Donatello. David . c. 1425–1430. Height 62-1/4&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    8. 8. David by Donatello <ul><li>Donatello sculpts the way that Masaccio paints </li></ul><ul><li>Donatello studied the Greek and Roman sculptures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>He takes a more naturalistic approach </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This sculpture show David just after slaying the giant Goliath </li></ul><ul><li>David stands in a contrapposto position </li></ul><ul><li>This David is more sensual than most previous sculptures </li></ul>
    9. 9. Sandro Botticelli. Birth of Venus . c. 1480. 5'8-7/8&quot; × 9'1-7/8&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    10. 10. Birth of Venus by Botticelli <ul><li>The first large mythological painting since antiquity </li></ul><ul><li>Portrays the goddess Venus at her birth </li></ul><ul><li>The posture denotes modesty, probably copied from the Roman sculpture of Venus </li></ul><ul><li>He shows the idealized female form, an idea taken from Greece, but infuses it with feeling </li></ul><ul><li>Putting a pagan goddess as a central figure in a painting was revolutionary, usually that spot was reserved for Mary </li></ul>
    11. 11. The High Renaissance <ul><li>High Renaissance-between 1490-1530 </li></ul><ul><li>Italian art reached its peak in the cities of Florence, Rome, and Venice </li></ul><ul><li>The major artists Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael developed a style that combined Christianity and Greek philosphy </li></ul>
    12. 12. Leonardo da Vinci <ul><li>Highly intelligent and curious, Leonardo kept journals of his research </li></ul><ul><li>His journals contain, anatomy studies, explorations, and mechanical devices </li></ul>
    13. 13. Leonardo da Vinci. The Babe in the Womb . c. 1510. 11-7/8&quot; × 8-3/8&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    14. 14. Leonardo da Vinci. Mona Lisa . c. 1503–1506. 30-1/4&quot; × 21&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    15. 15. Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci <ul><li>Her actual identity is unknown </li></ul><ul><li>Her slight smile is world famous </li></ul><ul><li>This piece is also famed for it’s hazy quality called sfumato </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sfumato-”without lines” </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Leonardo da Vinci. The Last Supper . Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan, Italy. c. 1495–1498. 14'5&quot; × 28'-1/4&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    17. 17. Leonardo da Vinci. The Last Supper . Perspective lines as both organizing structure and symbol of content. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    18. 18. Leonardo da Vinci. The Last Supper . Christ's figures as stabe triangle, contrasting with active turmoil of the disciples. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    19. 19. Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci <ul><li>Contains a hidden geometry and linear perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Leonardo depicts Jesus as an approachable and human being </li></ul><ul><li>Jesus sits in the center surrounded by his disciples </li></ul><ul><li>The fresco depicts the disciples’ reactions to Jesus' announcement that one of them will betray him </li></ul><ul><li>Judas is the darkest figure and the only one in full profile showing his guilt </li></ul>
    20. 20. Michelangelo Buonarroti. David . 1501–1504. Height of figure 14'3&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    21. 21. David by Michelangelo Buonarotti <ul><li>Depicts the biblical hero David just before his battle with Goliath </li></ul><ul><li>Made in the idealized Greek style </li></ul><ul><li>David stands in contrapposto with his weight on one foot as he begins to tense for his battle </li></ul><ul><li>This took 3 years for Michelangelo to sculpt </li></ul>
    22. 22. Michelangelo Buonarroti. The Creation of Adam . Frescoes on the ceiling of The Sistine Chapel. Vatican, Rome. 1508–1512. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    23. 23. Michelangelo Buonarroti. The Sistine Chapel . Frescoes on the ceiling of The Sistine Chapel. Vatican, Rome. 1508–1512. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    24. 24. Sistine Chapel Ceiling by Michelangelo <ul><li>Michelangelo had to be talked into this commission </li></ul><ul><li>Took four years to complete </li></ul><ul><li>In the highest portion, he paints the creation of the world </li></ul><ul><li>In the second portion, he paints prophets and sibyls </li></ul><ul><li>In the lowest level, he paints the judgement </li></ul>
    25. 25. Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio). Paul Preaching at Athens . 1515–1516. 11'5-1/2&quot; × 14'6-3/4&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    26. 26. Paul Preaching at Athens by Raphael <ul><li>Sophisticated use of space and a very real 3d quality </li></ul><ul><li>Reason can transmit religious truth </li></ul>
    27. 27. The Renaissance in Northern Europe <ul><li>A new interest in realism was also arising in northern Europe </li></ul><ul><li>These artist were even more concerned with depicting life in the real world </li></ul>
    28. 28. Jan van Eyck. The Arnolfini Portrait . The Portrait of Giovanni, Arnolfini and his Wife Giovanna Cenami. 1434. 33-1/2&quot; × 23-1/2&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    29. 29. The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck <ul><li>Jan van Eyck was THE painter of Flanders (Belgium, Netherlands, France) </li></ul><ul><li>He was one of the first to use oil paint </li></ul><ul><li>He mostly painted on wooden panels </li></ul><ul><li>Jan van Eyck is know for his use of detail and the illusion of depth and light </li></ul><ul><li>In the Arnolfini portrait, each object has a specific meaning or significance </li></ul><ul><li>The reflection in the mirror is very exact and you can see Jan van Eyck in that mirror as he paints the couple </li></ul>
    30. 30. Pieter Bruegel. Hunters in the Snow ( Jager im Schnee ). 1565. 46-1/2&quot; × 63-3/4&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    31. 31. Hunters in the Snow by Pieter Bruegel <ul><li>Pieter Bruegel developed a new style </li></ul><ul><li>He painted the lives of the surrounding countryside and the common people </li></ul><ul><li>This is called a genre painting </li></ul><ul><li>This painting is from a series depicting the seasons Andrea Palladio. Villa Rotonda . Vicenza, Italy. 1567–1570. </li></ul>
    32. 32. Baroque <ul><li>Baroque 1600-1770 </li></ul><ul><li>Uses the techniques of the Renaissance but moves in the direction of drama, emotion, and splendor </li></ul><ul><li>A new sense of vivid realism </li></ul>
    33. 33. Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The Conversion of Saint Paul . 1600-1601. 100-1/2&quot; × 69&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    34. 34. The Conversion of St. Paul by Caravaggio <ul><li>Created a dramatic use of light called chiaroscuro , a strong directional light </li></ul><ul><li>This painting shows St. Paul’s earth shattering conversion </li></ul><ul><li>An extreme view that uses foreshortening </li></ul>
    35. 35. Gian Lorenzo Bernini. David . 1623. Life-size. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    36. 36. David by Bernini <ul><li>A life size sculpture rather than monumental in size </li></ul><ul><li>In this depiction of David, Bernini decides to show David in the midst of the battle about to fling the stone that kills Goliath </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional intensity is key </li></ul>
    37. 37. Gian Lorenzo Bernini. The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa . Detail of the altar. 1645–1652. Life-size. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    38. 38. The Ecstasy of St. Theresa by Bernini <ul><li>Here Bernini depicts the vision described by St. Theresa in her diary </li></ul><ul><li>She saw an angel who seemed to pierce her heart with a flaming gold arrow, giving her great pain and pleasure </li></ul><ul><li>He shows that moment of greatest intesity </li></ul>
    39. 39. Peter Paul Rubens. The Raising of the Cross . 1601-1611. 462 × 339 cm. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    40. 40. The Raising of the Cross by Peter Paul Rubens <ul><li>Strong diagonal composition </li></ul><ul><li>The musculature of the men was influenced by the Italian painters he saw on a trip to Italy </li></ul><ul><li>Strong sense of action </li></ul>
    41. 41. Diego Velázquez de Silva. The Maids of Honor ( Las Meninas ). 1665. 138 × 276 cm. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    42. 42. The Maids of Honor by Diego Velasquez de Silva <ul><li>The artist is visible peaking out from behind his canvas </li></ul><ul><li>The maids of honor surround the king’s daughter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>She is the brightest object in the painting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The king and queen are reflected in the mirror </li></ul><ul><li>This painting is an elaborate game </li></ul>
    43. 43. The Kitchen Maid by Jan Vermeer <ul><li>Takes everyday life and raises it to the level of a religious portrayal </li></ul><ul><li>Light reveals each texture in exquisite detail </li></ul>
    44. 44. Jan Vermeer. The Kitchen Maid . c. 1658. 18&quot; × 16-1/8&quot;. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    45. 45. Pierre Patel. Versailles . c. 1665. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
    46. 46. Germain Boffrand. Salon de la Princesse , Hôtel de Soubise . Paris. Begun 1732. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.

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