CINDERELLAS AROUND THE WORLD
DIVERSITY THEMATIC UNIT
Dear Parents,

    We are doing a lesson plan on diversity. Our goal in this unit is to learn to appreciate each other’s
d...
Day 1

OBJECTIVES

As a result of this activity, the children will be able to :

 Work with a partner to answer questions ...
6.     Ask fat questions: What do you made her stepsisters treat her that way? Do you think her father accepted
          ...
Day 2

          On this day students will:

-start a Cinderella Journal and write notes about each version that will be u...
−    Have them go on line to http://www.bonjour.com/ to learn a few French words, specifically greetings and

         cou...
4. Give students a chance to read the Egyptian Princess in groups.

5. Have students make a map of Egypt ( in groups of 4)...
Day 4

Objectives:

Students will be able to:
-retell the Egyptian Cinderella story by drawing hieroglyphics
-define hiero...
Day 5

Objectives:

Students will be able to retell an Ojibwa Cinderella Story in their own words

Students will be able t...
5. Contrast the setting of this story with the Cinderella stories read over the past few days. Discuss what qualities
 of ...
Content Standards:

         .CM.04.01 : connect personal knowledge, experiences, and understanding of the world to themes...
R.CM.04.01: connect personal knowledge, experiences, and understanding of the world to themes and
perspectives in text thr...
Reflection on “ Cinderellas Around the World Unit plan”


I felt that this diversity thematic unit plan was a success. Stu...
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Lessons for diversity unit

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Lessons for diversity unit

  1. 1. CINDERELLAS AROUND THE WORLD
  2. 2. DIVERSITY THEMATIC UNIT
  3. 3. Dear Parents, We are doing a lesson plan on diversity. Our goal in this unit is to learn to appreciate each other’s differences as well as similarities. We all are unique. Our culture, religion, ethnicity, language and gender make us who we are. It will be helpful for the class if there is anything you can share with us regarding your child’s background. This will help your child learn about him/her self, appreciate their uniqueness as well as appreciate the uniqueness of others. We will be reading several different versions of Cinderella in class. Each version represents a different country/culture. We will be comparing and contrasting each of the stories. If you would like to get a hold of any version of Cinderella, I included a website that has many versions. You may want to find one that represents your roots. Here is a website that has a large list of Cinderella stories. http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/hqops/publishing/boolist_publications/book_links/booklinksbucket/m ulticultural.cfm Also, it would be very helpful for your child if you can spend at least 15 minutes each day reading to them. Helping our children become proficient readers is one of the best gifts we can give them. Sharing the joy of reading will open the doors to a lifetime of learning. The last day of the month we are planning to have a festival in which each student can bring in a special food to eat or a selection of music, or clothing to wear that expresses his/her culture. Feel free to ask the social studies team for any additional information or help that you may need. Sincerely, Social Studies Team
  4. 4. Day 1 OBJECTIVES As a result of this activity, the children will be able to : Work with a partner to answer questions in a cooperative manner. -discuss storytelling traditions -define components of a story -give an oral presentation of an adapted version of Cinderella MICHIGAN CONTENT STANDARDS R.CM.04.02 retell through concise summarization grade-level narrative and informational text. R.CM.04.03 explain relationships among themes, ideas, and characters within and across texts to create a deeper understanding by categorizing and classifying, comparing and contrasting, or drawing parallels across time and culture. MATERIALS NEEDED Trade book- Cinderella by Charles Perrault Construction paper crayons and markers PROCEDURE: 1. Activate prior knowledge. Have students come to a reading circle. Ask them to volunteer to tell the class what their favorite fairytales are and the main events in the story. 2. Explain to students the concept of storytelling and how it was used everywhere in the world since humans existed on our planet. Tell them that storytellers would travel to many different countries. Explain that when the tellers got to a different country, they would often change their story to engage the audience based on their culture. 3. Read English version of Cinderella to the students. 4. Do a think aloud with the story. Ex. Cinderella has a step mother. “Yes, I know how that feels. My cousin's stepmother does not treat them like her own. Not as bad as Cinderella, but still bad.” Step sisters,”Hmm, I don't have stepsisters. Does anyone have step sisters or brothers? Tell us about them.” etc. 5. Talk about the main components of the story to the class. (beginning, middle, and happy ending). (the first oral assessment).
  5. 5. 6. Ask fat questions: What do you made her stepsisters treat her that way? Do you think her father accepted how she was treated, why or why not? Etc.. 7. (closure) Put students into groups of 4 and have them work together to orally retell the story to the classroom. Make sure to put students with different learning abilities together. 8. Have students write in their journals about this version of Cinderella. ACCOMMODATIONS/ADAPTATIONS -This activity should be accessible to all students due to simply listening, -if students are visually impaired, place them in the front of the room. -If working with students who are hearing impaired, provide them with an interpreter and assistive technological devices. -If working with students with behavioral disorders, keep a close watch on them and provide a paraprofessional if possible to keep that student on track and help them cooperate in the class. EVALUATION/ 1. Have students compare their retelling of the Cinderella story with the rest of the class. 2. Have students fold a piece of paper in half and draw two characters: one bad and one good from the Cinderella story and give their reasons for whom they have chosen. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Trade book- Cinderella by Charles Perrault
  6. 6. Day 2 On this day students will: -start a Cinderella Journal and write notes about each version that will be used as we read them. Today, they will write about the English version that was read the day before. Making sure that they include the elements of the story.. − Explain to students that this version of Cinderella was published in France in 1697. Thee are many other versions of Cinderella all over the world. − Have students point out France from the world map on bulletin board. − − Access prior knowledge by asking students about the country of France. What do you know about France? Do you know anything that is unique to France? What is the capital of France? − Have students draw and color the flag of France − − Have students work on computers to find interesting facts about France. − Discuss their findings with the class. ( This can include people, culture, food, landmarks like the Eiffel tower and Notre Dom. ) We can
  7. 7. − Have them go on line to http://www.bonjour.com/ to learn a few French words, specifically greetings and courtesy.(independent practice) − Evaluate students by having a word bee.( I will say the words in English and student will be given a chance to say the word in French.) − The winner gets 2 free homework pass, the runner up gets one homework pass. Day three Objectives: Students will be able to: -define differences and similarities between the two Cinderella stories heard so far (American and Egyptian) -create a map that is includes major parts of the Cinderella story Michigan Content Standards R.NT.04.01 describe the shared human experience depicted in classic, multicultural, and contemporary literature recognized for quality and literary merit R.AT.04.01 be enthusiastic about reading and do substantial reading and writing on their own L.RP.04.04 combine skills to reveal strengthening literacy (e.g., viewing then analyzing in writing, listening then giving an opinion orally). 4 – G1.0.3 Identify and describe the characteristics and purposes (e.g., measure distance, determine relative location, classify a region) of a variety of geographic tools and technologies Materials: The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo -Computers with internet access -paper -pencils -large enough paper to make a map (construction, chart, tagboard, etc) -markers Procedure: 1- Review with students the French Cinderella by playing 20 questions. Asking fat questions. Example. Why do you think her stepsisters treated her that way? Do you have any questions that you would want to ask the characters of the story? What did you find most interesting about the story and why? 2. Activate prior knowledge by asking students if they have heard of other versions of Cinderella. If so, what versions have they read? Did you know that there are as many different versions of Cinderella as there are cultures? 3. Show the cover of the book and ask students what they think will be different in this version. Ask where Egypt is located? What they know of ancient Egypt?
  8. 8. 4. Give students a chance to read the Egyptian Princess in groups. 5. Have students make a map of Egypt ( in groups of 4). Important parts of the book should be included in the map, such as the great falcon, symbol of the god Horus etc. 6. Hang a map of ancient Egypt for students to use as a guide. 7. Allow students access to a computer to find more information about Egypt. 8. Hang student's maps in the classroom. (closure) Give each group a chance to explain their map and relate it to the story. Accomodations: For students who have trouble reading, you can provide for them cassettes of the story to listen to. Throughout the activity, teacher should be scaffolding and helping students when they need it. Evaluation: Review with children both stories and have them write key words about each story on index cards. Place two hula hoops on the floor. Label one for the common version of Cinderella and one for The Egyptian Cinderella and ask the children to place the cards in the appropriate hoop. Let them figure out the overlap of words requires an overlap of the hoops. Provide guidance only as necessary. Bibliography: education.csm.edu/students/.../lesson plans/ ( with editing )
  9. 9. Day 4 Objectives: Students will be able to: -retell the Egyptian Cinderella story by drawing hieroglyphics -define hieroglyphics Materials: -The book The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo -Large roll of brown paper -paint -paintbrushes Procedures 1. Pass around photographs of hieroglyphics and ask students to talk about what they see. 2. talk about hieroglyphics (what they are, what they are used for, what they mean, etc.) 3. give instructions for the activity (students get into small groups and will paint their own hieroglyphics to retell the story of the Egyptian Cinderella that they heard last class). Monitor students progress Accommodations: If a student is unable to paint, he or she can give ideas as to what should go onto the paper. Evaluation: Students will explain their hieroglyphics and answer any questions their peers may have.
  10. 10. Day 5 Objectives: Students will be able to retell an Ojibwa Cinderella Story in their own words Students will be able to place events in chronological order. describe and compare character traits of the main characters. compare and contrast the three Cinderella books. Michigan Content Standards R.NT.04.01 describe the shared human experience depicted in classic, multicultural, and contemporary literature recognized for quality and literary merit. R.IT.04.02 identify and describe informational text patterns including compare/contrast, cause/effect, and problem/solution. R.IT.04.03 explain how authors use text Materials: Sootface by Robert D. San Souci, Cinderella , and the Egyptian Cinderella Index cards Chart paper and sticky notes to create a Venn diagram Drum Procedure: 1. Sit on the floor and beat softly on a drum while you call the students to quietly sit with you on the floor. 2. Tell the students that long, long ago many people lived on this continent. These people are Native Americans. Explain that the drum represents, for the Native American and African American people of long ago and today, the heartbeat of the people. There were and are different nations of Native Americans; one nation is called the Algonquin. Tell the students the story you will read today comes from an Algonquin legend. Like other stories it started with an oral tradition, now it is written down for us in this version called Sootface. Tell the students that you want them to listen for similarities and differences between this book and the other Cinderella stories. 3. Read Sootface to the class. As the students move back to their seats, ask them to think about what was the greatest strength in the story—the thing that was most valued. Listen to their ideas and encourage them dialogue about the meaning of good character. 4. Ask the students to describe the main characters. Make a list on the board of the good and bad qualities of each character.
  11. 11. 5. Contrast the setting of this story with the Cinderella stories read over the past few days. Discuss what qualities of this story make it uniquely Native American. Discuss the symbolism of the animals and the Great Spirit. 6. Compare the three Cinderella books using a three-circle Venn diagram ( have chart paper set out on the floor with students sitting around it. Use sticky notes to place the story traits in the appropriate places on the diagram. 7. Discuss the idea that the moral or lesson of the story is found in stories from different cultures because it is an issue that all cultures face. 8. (closure) Have students write in their journal about this version of Cinderella. ACCOMODATIONS: Students who have trouble expressing their ideas on paper can orally express them and have a fellow student write for them. Evaluation: Have students check their venn diagrams and give their reasons for their answers. Bibliography: http://www.learningtogive.com/lessons/ Day 6 -Talk about diversity with students and have them show their diversity in the class. What makes them different from their classmates and what makes them similar? -Review the Native American Cinderella story and talk about Native American traditions. Access their prior knowledge about traditions and cultures. - Tell students that we will be making something special to Native Americans. “Masks were used for ceremonies and festive occasions. They were made from corn husks, wood, gourds, leather, straw, and other items from natural surroundings. “ -Students can design festive masks from brown paper bags. Masks can be decorated with paint and feathers and other objects that convey a special message from the owner. Have students be creative and show their style just like the Native Americans do. -Play with students a mini jeopardy game about the three versions of Cinderella which include themes, characters, villains, places, plot and facts about the countries discussed.Title: Yeh-Shen A Cinderella Story From China Objectives: Students will Become familiar with the Chinese version of Cinderella Compare this version of Cinderella to other Cinderella stories Become familiar with Chinese culture and art/architecture
  12. 12. Content Standards: .CM.04.01 : connect personal knowledge, experiences, and understanding of the world to themes and perspectives in text through oral and written responses. R.CM.04.02: Retell through concise summarization grade-level narrative and informational text. R.CM.O4.03 : Explain relationships among themes, ideas, and characters within and across texts to create a deeper understanding by categorizing and classifying, comparing and contrasting, or drawing parallels across time and culture. G.1. The World in Spatial Terms 4-G1.O.1: Identify questions geographers ask in examining the world(e.g., Where is it? What is it like there? How is it connected to other places?) 4-G1.0.4: Use geographic tools and technologies, stories, songs, and pictures to answer geographic questions about the world. Materials: Book-Yeh-Shen by Ai Ling Louie, other Cinderella stories, H-chart or Venn-Diagram, map of the world, information on China Procedures: Ask students questions about the previous Cinderella story that was read. Where was the origin? What happened with the stepsisters? Etc. Identify on the map the location of China. Tell a little background information about China. Then, read the book Yeh-Shen. Teacher model: While reading make stops to think aloud. Make stops where students can make predictions and compare Cinderella stories. Read the story to the end. Pair up the students. Have them Think-Pair-Share what they learned from this story. Guided Practice: Students read story with a partner. Teacher helps students as they think aloud with partner. Students then work together on an H-chart to compare and contrast this story with previous ones. Independent practice/Closure: Students write a short summary about the story. Accommodations/Adaption: Depending on grade and ability—draw pictures, describe story verbally, reread. Assessment: Were students able to compare and contrast the different Cinderella stories? Were they able to tap prior knowledge about other versions of Cinderella? Did they share what they know with their partner? Following day(s): Students get in groups and create a reenactment of their favorite Cinderella Story and share with the class. Elaborate on this with costumes, props, etc. Title: Mexico: Nature and Community reflected in their culture and art. Objectives: Students will Learn about the Huichol Indians of Mexico through class discussion and readings of The Journey of Tunuri and the Blue Deer, by James Endredy and Adelita: A Mexican Cinderella Story by Thomie dePaola, Compare artwork and importance of nature and community in the two stories. Design a yarn painting and write a story based on the painting. Content standards:
  13. 13. R.CM.04.01: connect personal knowledge, experiences, and understanding of the world to themes and perspectives in text through oral and written responses. R.CM.04.02: Retell through concise summarization grade-level narrative and informational text. R.CM.O4.03: Explain relationships among themes, ideas, and characters within and across texts to create a deeper understanding by categorizing and classifying, comparing and contrasting, or drawing parallels across time and culture. G.1. The World in Spatial Terms 4-G1.0.4: Use geographic tools and technologies, stories, songs, and pictures to answer geographic questions about the world. Visual Arts Apply knowledge of materials, techniques and processes to create artwork. Explore and understand prospective subject matter, ideas and symbols for works of art. Select and use subject matter, symbols and ideas to communicate meaning. Materials: The Journey of Tunuri and the Blue Deer, by James Endredy, Adelita: A Mexican Cinderella Story by Thomie dePaola, cardboard, glue, several bright color yarn, pencil, paper, paint, markers or crayons. Procedures: Find the location of Mexico on the map and introduce the class to the Huichol people. Emphasis should be placed on their strong beliefs about nature and their practice of communicating with symbols. Read the story Adelita: A Mexican Cinderella Story. Read the story The Journey of Tunui and the Blue Deer. Compare the pictures in both books. How does nature play a part in the stories? Another comparison that should be made is the bright colors in the artwork and the simplicity in the lines. This will make it easy to create a yarn painting. How does community play a part in the books? Do you feel a sense of unity amongst the people? Guided practice: Students share ideas about community and nature with a partner. Teacher will go around and monitor students for understanding. Independent practice: Students write down ideas in their journals. Accommodations/Adaption: Simplify lesson and offer additional assistance when needed. Assessment: Were students able to see the similarities between the pictures in the books? Did they understand how nature and community plays a part in the stories? Were they able to express this through written and verbal communication?
  14. 14. Reflection on “ Cinderellas Around the World Unit plan” I felt that this diversity thematic unit plan was a success. Students were so eager to discover that there were many other versions Cinderella and could relate it to the culture that each story represents. The books were wonderfully rich with text and great illustrations which helped promote the importance of diversity in the world today and in the past. This unit plan shows students that no matter how different we may be on the outside, in the end we are all the same. It is a break from the same old boring routine and was welcomed with open arms. It helped spark whole group discussion and the importance of celebrating our diversities and also noticing our similarities. Students were very eager to connect the stories with the countries that each book represents. Some of the lessons needed two days because the students were so into it, but that was okay. The goal was understanding and making it fun, which it was. Finishing it off with culture day really sealed the idea of diversity in their minds. Students who needed extra help or just attention were seated next to me or assigned a teammate to help them out.

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