Allison Leach 2013 Work Highlights

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A presentation in which I pitch myself as a design researcher to prospective employers. If that's you, I'm looking for work in the Bay Area beginning May 2013. Please leave a message or visit my website www.allisonvleach.com for further contact information.

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Allison Leach 2013 Work Highlights

  1. 1. Allison v. Leachdesign researcher and strategist
  2. 2. in a nutshellDesign researcher and strategist who studies theintricacies of human behavior to uncover insights thatwill inform and inspire design innovation.
  3. 3. • observer
  4. 4. • thinker
  5. 5. • researcher
  6. 6. the road todesign researchChildhood: film, photography, and writingCollege: poetry and psychology at BrownDesign school: Parsons and CCAClass: design researchThesis: cognitive design
  7. 7. linkedin
  8. 8. linkedin diverse education
  9. 9. linkedin hybrid designer
  10. 10. linkedin creative industries
  11. 11. linkedin
  12. 12. web portfoliowww.allisonvleach.com
  13. 13. skills breakdownGraphic DesignInteraction DesignDesign Research and Strategy
  14. 14. Graphic Designskills breakdown adobe typography color theorycreative suite training
  15. 15. Interaction Designskills breakdown adobe IX theory basic html final cutsuite pro keynotecreative training & cs3
  16. 16. Interaction Designskills breakdown adobe IX theory basic html keynotecreative suite training & cs3final cut pro
  17. 17. Interaction Designskills breakdown adobe IX theory keynotecreative suite training basic htmlfinal cut pro & cs3
  18. 18. Design Research and Strategy skills breakdown variety of needs data synthesis researchidentification and analysis methodologiesdefining design brand user experienceprinciples and direction & planningopportunities market trends
  19. 19. Design Research and Strategy skills breakdown variety of needs data synthesis researchidentification and analysis methodologiesdefining design brand user experienceprinciples and direction & planningopportunities market trends
  20. 20. my researchprinciples• User empathy first• Build on others’ research• Iterate, iterate, iterate• Get out there!• Embrace creative differences• Turn surprises into opportunities
  21. 21. my researchprinciples• User empathy first• Build on others’ research• Iterate, iterate, iterate• Get out there!• Embrace creative differences• Turn surprises into opportunities
  22. 22. Garmin approached us to conduct research for a new approach toDesign Research and Strategy direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world.case study 1 /3skills breakdownGarmin• Prompt: GPS technology company Garmin approached myteam of classmates to conduct research about how people usecues from the natural world to navigate.• Work: Research proposal, in-depth interviews, video ofinsights, a presentation of findings and design opportunities
  23. 23. Garmin approached us to conductdocumentation research for a new approach to direction mapping that integrates Discussion elements of the natural world. Guide Screener Last updated 10/17/11 Discussion Guide Team Calicocho Proposal Locations: mall, park, and city. A. Brief Intercept Interviews: Prompt: Our team will pretend to be lost, and ask nearby people how to get to a particular destination. These intercepts will last approximately one to five minutes in duration, depending Screener on their nature. Team Calicocho B. Voluntary Blog Solicitations A blog for gathering stories about navigation will be created. To advertise the blog, a post will be made on Craigslit. In addition, posters will be posted throughout CCA’s San Francisco main RECRUITING OBJECTIVE building. Students can contribute written stories, photos, and videos. Our team will curate the submitted post.  Recruit 12 participants to keep 10  All of the participants must speak English C. Formal Interview Process  The participants must frequently engage in non-car navigation. First Meeting  Participants must be a mix of 1. Introduction 2. Homework Discussion  design research consulting Residents (of various years) Recruit 2-3  Visitors/Tourists Recruit 3-4 Second Meeting 1. Map Drawing and Task Analysis.  Professional delivery workers Recruit 3-4 2. Interview Questions. 3. Map Alteration Opportunity.  Outdoor city officials (park guides, police officers) Recruit 2-3 project background  Participants must possess a mix of navigation skills (ranging from accurate, average, to poor) First Meeting  Garmin Ltd. develops consumer, aviation, and marine technologies for the Global The sample must represent a mix of technology-use levels (ranging from Introduction Positioning System. Most current Garmin devices can display the current location on frequent, average, to none) Hello, my name is ___________, and with me I also have __________and a map. The maps are vector-based and stored in the built-in memory or loaded from ____________who are working with me on this project. From this research, we want to know what elements of the natural world can help with navigation. We want to hear stories from your SCHEDULE life, no matter where, when, or whom with they occurred, that will give us a picture of what influences navigation in a positive and negative way. We are also going to discuss your ideas for  offers a wide variety of maps for purchase, including detailed road maps, topographic Ten (10) 1-hour contextual visits with the participant in their home. future solutions that will enhance your overall experience with navigation.  Five maps and nautical maps. Non-commercial maps are also available and can be displayed (5) of the ten (10) participants will be asked to lead us on a 30-minute on most Garmin GPS devices. walk from their home to one of their frequent destinations. Before we being our conversation, I want to explain a few rules: • I do not work for the company that is sponsoring this project, so feel free to express your honest opinions. You will not please or displease me if you say something for or against a certain topic. Disclaimer for Termination: • There are no right or wrong answers. research objectives • Please be careful to speak one at a time so we can hear you clearly onthe audio recording. Thanks for your time. Unfortunately we only needed a limited number of individuals in recording audio and video for research purposes only. The footage will not be used in • We are each profile and we have already recruited as many individuals as we need with thepublic. Garmin, maker of handheld and automobile GPS navigators, wants to develop a new profile that you represent. approach to direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world that can Let us begin with your introductions: help with navigation. In support of this goal, Calicocho is conducting design research • Please tell me your name, and • What you do that will uncover unique insights into how people with navigational needs currently use INTRODUCTION (For use in interception-type recruiting) Homework Discussion signs in the natural world to get around. Good morning/afternoon/evening, my name is _________ and I am a graduate Homework Participants will receive directions for a homework exercise. They will use their own Design student of California College of the Arts. My classmates and I are currently conductingto take a minimum of 15 photos of a familiar route they frequently navigate without a car. camera a key questions study to understand how people with navigational needs currently use signs in the natural world to get around. I am not trying to sell you anything, and everything you say 1. How do people prepare for a trip to an unfamiliar destination? will be treated in the strictest confidence. Could I have a moment of your time to ask you a few questions? 2. How do people remember their routes? 3. What are the differences between navigating through nature and the labeled world? 4. What elements are important to people when giving or following directions/creating a mental map? 5. 6. How do navigation strategies and methods differ with extreme users (e.g. visually impaired or occupational navigators ) and non-extreme users? 2
  24. 24. Garmin approached us to conductmethodology research for a new approach to direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world. PHO TO D IA RY M A P D RAWIN G IN-D EPTH INT ERVIEW EXPERT IN T E RC EP T P UB LIC B LOG INT E RV IE W IN T E RV IEW
  25. 25. user interviews Garmin approached us to conduct research for a new approach toand activities direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world.demographics male female 0 2 4 6 8 10 bus riders walkers drivers subway riders bikers longboarders 0 2 4 6 8 10 online map car GPS stand-alone GPS smartphone GPS 0 2 4 6 8 10 ALLEN ARIEL
  26. 26. video interview Garmin approached us to conduct research for a new approach tosynthesis direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world.
  27. 27. Garmin approached us to conductfindings research for a new approach to direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world. “bad lost” / “good lost” CONTRADICTION #1: navigation strategies “I use my GPS all the time, but I really learning wish I could navigate without it.” pro-active learners / instinctive learners pride in navigational skills CONTRADICTION #2: “I sometimes enjoy getting lost. exploring growing use of GPS I’ll even get lost on purpose!” CONTRADICTION #3: direction- “I don’t use a GPS to give directions.” giving B RY C E A R IE L giving directions park / downtown bodily orientation empathy accuracy GPS non-usage memorable units of information
  28. 28. Garmin approached us to conductrecommendations research for a new approach to direction mapping that integrates elements of the natural world. design opportunity:a desired navigation experience: creates a learning adventure supports An interactive system that encourages people to: and empathy build upon their innate navigational evokes a multi-sensory journey capabilities learn about and explore their surroundings LE A R NING EXP LORIN G G IVIN G D IR EC TI ON S
  29. 29. Design Research and Strategycase study 2 /3skills breakdownthesis• Overview: An investigation of cognitive design as a tool forproductive behavior• Work: Primary and secondary research; surveys; interviews;critical writing; concept prototyping; generation of cognitivedesign insights and design opportunities
  30. 30. my researchprinciples• User empathy first• Build on others’ research• Iterate, iterate, iterate• Get out there!• Embrace creative differences• Turn surprises into opportunities
  31. 31. topic Statement: Leveraging our modern knowledge of cognitive science, how might designers create artifacts that motivate people toward positive behaviors - particularly those related to productivity and willpower- to improve overall well-being?
  32. 32. research
  33. 33. researchSecondary: Existing DataREADING LIST KEY ELEMENTS OF MOTIVATION COGNITIVE BIASES Behavior Flow 3 Drives Motivation Biological Drive Motivation Symbolic Skill Autonomy Ability Rewards & Punishments Rules Mastery Trigger Intrinsic Rewards Goal Purpose Feedback Awe Herd Instinct Hawthorne Effect Reactance Irrational Instills a sense of When people adopt the The tendency to act differently The urge to do the Mental activities: Psychological timelessness; behaviors and opinions of when someone knows they are opposite of whatDangers of rules, a goal, and a nudges in a game reasoning is promotes helpfulness; the majority being observed someone wants you toextrinsic rewards way of obtaining have a real impact everywhere, such BJ Fogg Mihaly Daniel Pink encourages do out of a need to resist feedback in guiding behavior as the power of stanford social Csikszentmihalyi social norms author of drive experiential purchases a perceived attempt to scientist author of flow constrain your freedom of choice
  34. 34. researchSecondary: Existing DataREADING LIST KEY ELEMENTS OF MOTIVATION COGNITIVE BIASES Behavior Flow 3 Drives Motivation Biological Drive Motivation Symbolic Skill Autonomy Ability Rewards & Punishments Rules Mastery Trigger Intrinsic Rewards Goal Purpose Feedback Awe Herd Instinct Hawthorne Effect Reactance Irrational Instills a sense of When people adopt the The tendency to act differently The urge to do the Mental activities: Psychological timelessness; behaviors and opinions of when someone knows they are opposite of whatDangers of rules, a goal, and a nudges in a game reasoning is promotes helpfulness; the majority being observed someone wants you toextrinsic rewards way of obtaining have a real impact everywhere, such BJ Fogg Mihaly Daniel Pink encourages do out of a need to resist feedback in guiding behavior as the power of stanford social Csikszentmihalyi social norms author of drive experiential purchases a perceived attempt to scientist author of flow constrain your freedom of choicePrimary: Interviews and ExperimentsONLINE SURVEY: Motivation and You ONLINE SURVEY:Allison Leach and You Motivation SOCIAL EXPERIMENT Q: Does awe inspire timelessness and increase helpfulness? CONTEXT METHOD RESULTS CONTEXT METHOD RESULTS Survey Takeaways • Intrinsic rewards trump • Gambling no; all others gamification sometimes; music yes • Motivated but habits hard to form • Experiential expenditures > future • Tricks help to get things investments Study: awe gives people Group A: Nature video Awe instilled, but done greater time-availability, negligible change in time • People like reminders Group B: Instructional video perception and mood • Social support keeps and are influenced by reduces irritability, people in line makes them act more social guilt Group C: No video Uniform volunteerism in generously What types of rewards do you value? Questionnaire followed by the clean-up event volunteer opportunity Limited pool of participants
  35. 35. approach
  36. 36. needsidentification
  37. 37. prototypes First Iteration
  38. 38. prototypes First Iteration
  39. 39. prototypes Second Iteration
  40. 40. prototypes Partners: Janette and Maria Willpower Challenge: Procrastination Second Iteration Study Length: Monday 3/11 through Sunday 3/17 ImPulse Bracelet MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUP YOU YOUR PARTNER MONITOR Directions MAKE TO-DO LISTS RECEIVE NOTICE PROCRASTINATING? TURN ON IMPULSE DO ACTIVITY SEND PROGRESS ALL SET! SET-UP SCHMET-UP GET ‘ER DONE HOW YOU DOING? 1. Email the Monitor a list of 3. Wear your ImPulse bracelet 6. Periodically, The Monitor will (1) your Top 3 Long-Term Monday through Sunday as often as remind you to check in with Goals and (2) your Top 3 possible. On your wrist, belt loop, or your partner. Let your partner Temptations (unproductive backpack - whatever works best! know how you’re doing by
  41. 41. insights &Recommendations Work in progress!
  42. 42. spark!Design Research and Strategycase study 3 /3skills breakdownculture cave• Product: A toy that teaches kids about culture throughtraditional stories enhanced by interactive, open-ended, andhands-on activities that spring from that narrative.• Work: Market research; ethnographic research; interviews;prototype testing; comprehensive business plan
  43. 43. my researchprinciples• User empathy first• Build on others’ research• Iterate, iterate, iterate• Get out there!• Embrace creative differences• Turn surprises into opportunities
  44. 44. ethnographyKids and Technology spark! Culture Cave 3 spark! Culture Cave 7
  45. 45. product design PRODUCT The Unique iPad App Unlike other subscription products for kids on the market, the Culture Cave App leverages the iPad’s video, audio, interaction, and camera functionality to deliver an immersive and holistic cultural educational experience. The Coolest of Hangouts No other subscription service offers Culture Cave’s tent—a place kids can claim as their own, and where they can enjoy an immersive audio experience. A Variety of Proven Activities A Vibrant Online Community Kids can do Culture Cave activities on their own or with their parents or The Culture Cave website hosts a Forum for parents to share experiences friends. Our activities are created by native country experts and then vetted and ideas, a Gallery for kids to upload their favorite works, and a Cultural by educators, parents, and kids. Event Calendar to learn about upcoming happenings.
  46. 46. prototype testing 4 spark! Culture Cave
  47. 47. business plan Company Identity CAVE THE SOLUTION: CULTURE BRANDINGween Color Palette spark! Logo spark!a Brand Attributeshis is Our Mission Culture Cave Logo cheerful inspiring insightful To be the leading provider of fun, holistic, immersive and interactive cultural curious surprising creative education for children. silly trustworthy spark! Our Visionough To help raise the next generation of global citizens. Brand Typeface Our Values Brandon Grotesque: We will always put kids first. Thin Light Regular We will provide multicultural education that is fun and promotes respect. Medium Bold Black We will encourage children to continuously explore and question. 18 spark! Culture Cave spark! Culture Cave 5
  48. 48. business planIndustry Landscape Market Identification COMPETITION TARGET MARKET Little National Geographic Children’s Kiwi Crate Culture Cave Passports Magazine for Kids Creativity Museum Monthly magazine with Current iPad Market (US) Monthly subscription information about animals, Monthly subscription of Monthly subscription of An interactive art and of materials for arts and materials focused on learning science, technology, technology museum for kids materials that encourage Parents own approximately 61% of all iPads. projected crafts, science activities, archaeology, geography, learning aboutPrimary and open-ended play about other countries and pop culture - plus jokes, foreign cultures In 2012, parents owned 25.5 million iPads. 60.8 million iPad users For kids ages 3 to 12Offerings For kids ages 5 to 10 games, and activities. ( 2014 ) For kids ages 3 to 7 For kids ages 5 to 10 Overall iPad ownership is on the rise with a Memberships range from For kids ages 6 to 14 projected 31% growth by 2014. The total number of iPad-owning parents will likely 41.9 million all iPad owners increase proportionally to 37 million by 2014. ( 2012 ) The museum offers many Culture Cave offers Approximately 40% of all school children in Includes a letter from hands-on activities. Founded by a former eBay a dedicated sound- and PayPal executive, a fictional travelers Sam Kids have free online access equipped play space, the US are between the ages of 5 and 9. and Sofia describing their Membership includes: PayPal cofounder, and an to games, videos, photos, iPad-based games and ex-Yahoo product manager. foreign country adventures hands-on activities. We thus estimate our total market—iPad owning parents with children between the Subscription includes only events Kits address specific National Geographic is Kids can share their ages of 5 and 9 in the US—to be around 10 iPad owningStrengths developmental areas access to online games a well-known and well- favorite work online. 25.5 million such as creating, and activities respected brand. million. parents openings and special moving, discovering, performances Parents have access to a Of that population, we will target 1 million ( 2012 ) Little Passports offers communicating, and caring. National Geographic has rich online community. been in business for 35 years people in Phase 1. Activities encourage and has strong brand loyalty. Activities are designed for Agents earn up to 30% parent involvement both parent and child, as of all personal sales. at the museum well as for the child only. Sources: 1 million our target New Media Trend Watch, April 2012 market The Financial Telegraph, April 2012 The museum has limited hours from Wednesdays to National Center for Education Statistics, 2011 Kiwi Crate doesn’t address Little Passports mostly New Media Trend Watch, April 2012 Sundays, 10am to 4pm. cultural education. appeals to girls. National Geographic’s Culture Cave costs The Financial Telegraph, April 2012 magazine has little Activities are not more than mostWeaknesses Kiwi Crate has no integrated Little Passports has minimal content and lots of designed to involve both subscription products digital component, no online digital content, no advertising for candy, parents and kids. for kids. online community, and no sharing community, and no video games, and movies. dedicated play space for kids. dedicated play space for kids. The Museum doesn’t address cultural education. spark! Culture Cave 11 6 spark! Culture Cave
  49. 49. business planUser Experience Product Design CONFIRM OUT-OF-BOX USE SHARE PRODUCT 1 Sign Up Online We offer 3 monthly subscription levels. Parents note kids are more Comment on spark! forumOpen access to spark! forum Easy to set up and get started Kids like cool hangouts, they want your iPad, and informed and inquisitive Confirmation High parental involvement mentions they love getting surprises. email from spark! Activities bring parents and Both kid(s) and kids together Blog posts Imagine teaching kids about cultures from around 1-week welcome parent(s) involved notification postcard Kids sharing with parents spark! community upload page the world in a cool hangout, through interactive their creations iPad games and many fun hands-on-activities. iTunes review Simple tasks child can do Using code to download new country app word-of-mouth Carrying case for the tent Here’s how it works: and accessories Parents arrange playdates with Review country on spark! website 30-minute setup Teacher recommendations Download app 2 Receive your Setup Kit Your Setup Kit will arrive in a 3 Receive your Monthly Country Kit The Monthly Kit Watch online video on couple of weeks. It includes the Culture Cave tent, a world map, a includes a traditional story, hands-on activities, and an iPad app tablet for setting up tent passport, and instructions for the iPad app. secret story code. Each month, a new country is featured. Both kid(s) and parent(s) involved coming in the mail spark! Gallery (showcase of Simple tasks child can do kid-generated work) Kids sharing activities 1-week welcome Carrying case for the tent with each other word-of-mouth notification postcard and accessories spark! Culture Cave 17 12 spark! Culture Cave
  50. 50. business planMarketing Strategy Company GrowthMARKETING COMPANY GROWTH Plan of Action Future Projections PHASE 1 End of Year One In Phase One, we are planning to sell our product to middle-class parents We plan to sell 12,500 kits in Year One.Advertisingspark! Culture Cave will run advertisements in different media channels kit sales per week. We will be selling through our own website, Scholastic End of Year Two magazine, and Amazon.such as travel and family magazines, mommy blogs, Scholastic catalog and We plan to double our sales to 25,000 kits in Year Two.children-focused websites. PHASE 2Complimentary sample kits In Phase Two, we will develop software compatibility with other tablets and establish partnerships with gaming platforms such as Wii. We will introduceWe will reach out to top media reviewers and educators and provide them a Netflix-style queue to allow parents and kids to arrange their own list ofwith free samples to test our product and generate buzz. countries.Word-of-Mouth PHASE 3Our customers will also learn about us through different personal As our business picks up, we will extend our distribution channels to includesocial circles such as from children’s classmates, teachers, friends, andother families. retail stores such as bookstores, airports stores, museum stores, toy stores and Airports specialty stores - and eventually implement a stand-alone Culture Cave store. Museum Gift Stores “Imagine traveling all More Countries Toy Stores over the world from the same place!” Queue PHASE 1 PHASE 2 PHASE 320 spark! Culture Cave 26 spark! Culture Cave
  51. 51. business plan Financial PlanningANCIALS Annual Budget Revenue Projections Having shipped 250 kits per week by the end of Year 1, spark! Culture Cave YEAR ONE YEAR TWO Revenue million by the end of Year 2. Due to this growth, spark!’s annual income will Service Costs OVERHEAD COSTS Budget Distribution for Year One Budget Distribution for Year Two Salary and Administration Marketing Vendor Relations Support Total Costs Annual Income Startup Costs — 36% Salaries and Administration 20% Salaries and Administration 15% Marketing and Public Relations 12% Marketing and Public Relations Gross Profit Margin — 24% 14% Vendor Relations 15% Vendor Relations 3% Support 3% Support 30% Cost of Services 31% Cost of Services 0% Annual Income 20% Annual Income spark! Culture Cave 25! Culture Cave
  52. 52. my researchprinciples✓ User empathy first✓ Build on others’ research✓ Iterate, iterate, iterate✓ Get out there!✓ Embrace creative differences✓ Turn surprises into opportunities
  53. 53. thank youAllison V. Leachwww.allisonvleach.com

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