Sexuality and Obesity: a Gender Perspective <br /> <br />Nathalie Bajos1,2, Kaye Wellings2,  Caroline Moreau1<br />1 CESP ...
Background<br />Obesity and sexuality<br />-nospecificsurvey<br />Obesity and sexualhealth<br />	- erectiledysfunction in ...
Conceptualframework<br />	Issues surrounding sexuality are subordinated to issues in the reproduction of other social, eco...
Method<br />A surveycarried out in 2006<br />Randomsampling on fixed and mobile phones<br />Population aged 18 to 69, over...
Objective and subjective BMI<br />
BMI of respondents and their sexual partners<br />
Sexual behaviours by BMI status (women)<br />
Sexual behaviours by BMI status (men)<br />
Sexual dysfunction and BMI<br />
BMI and sexual and reproductive health (women)<br />
BMI and sexual and reproductive health (men)<br />
Discussion (1)<br />Lowerprevalence of obesity / national nutrition survey (misclassificationunlikely to be associated wit...
Discussion (2)<br />A markedgendereffect in a context of stronger social pressure on womenregardingweight(women  more like...
Discussion (3)<br />The marked increase in risk of unintended pregnancy, despite lower fecundity in OW, reflects, not patt...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

12 ème journée-Etude sociologique sur la sexualité des personnes obèses.

1,340 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,340
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
341
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

12 ème journée-Etude sociologique sur la sexualité des personnes obèses.

  1. 1. Sexuality and Obesity: a Gender Perspective <br /> <br />Nathalie Bajos1,2, Kaye Wellings2, Caroline Moreau1<br />1 CESP U1018, Kremlin Bicetre, France, 2 LSHTM, London, UK<br /> 12ème journéed’Endocrinologie, 27 mai 2011, Paris<br />
  2. 2. Background<br />Obesity and sexuality<br />-nospecificsurvey<br />Obesity and sexualhealth<br /> - erectiledysfunction in men<br /> - increase in STIs<br />Clinical studies on morbidly obese men<br />Few studies on women<br />
  3. 3. Conceptualframework<br /> Issues surrounding sexuality are subordinated to issues in the reproduction of other social, economic and political relations.<br /> Social representations of sexuality form a coherent system which allows gender relations to (re)produce themselves, to shift or to weaken<br /> The effect of BMI on sexuality and sexual health outcomes would be different between men and women, social stigma being stronger on overweight and obese women<br /> Obese women may be at greater risk of negative sexual outcomes because of social stigma and lack of adequate medical follow-up<br />
  4. 4. Method<br />A surveycarried out in 2006<br />Randomsampling on fixed and mobile phones<br />Population aged 18 to 69, over-representation of 18-24 yearolds, n=12 364<br />Length of questionnaire: 49 minutes<br />Acceptance rate: 75%<br />Chlamydia screening <br />WHO classification of BMI<br />
  5. 5. Objective and subjective BMI<br />
  6. 6. BMI of respondents and their sexual partners<br />
  7. 7. Sexual behaviours by BMI status (women)<br />
  8. 8. Sexual behaviours by BMI status (men)<br />
  9. 9. Sexual dysfunction and BMI<br />
  10. 10. BMI and sexual and reproductive health (women)<br />
  11. 11. BMI and sexual and reproductive health (men)<br />
  12. 12. Discussion (1)<br />Lowerprevalence of obesity / national nutrition survey (misclassificationunlikely to be associated with the reporting of sexualbehaviours)<br />First survey on BMI and sexuality<br />Increasedrisk of erectiledysfunctionamong OM noted in otherstudieshowever no increase in sexualdysfunctionamong OW<br />Increasedrisk of unplannedpregnancyamong OW not found in a US study(national survey of familygrowth)<br />
  13. 13. Discussion (2)<br />A markedgendereffect in a context of stronger social pressure on womenregardingweight(women more likely to think that they were too fat; fewer OM than OW reported having an overweight or obese sexual partner; OW less likely than OM to have had a sexual partner in the last 12 months, OW more likely to seek partners on the Internet) <br />Psychological factors (such as poor sexual self esteem leading to difficulty in allowing or initiating sex) may also be involved and derives from social stereotypes around obesity<br />The lower prevalence of medical consultation for contraception among obese women may also be attributable to concerns over body image and weight. <br />
  14. 14. Discussion (3)<br />The marked increase in risk of unintended pregnancy, despite lower fecundity in OW, reflects, not patterns of sexual behaviour, but reliance on less effective methods of contraception.<br />OW show more infrequent attendance at health care services for contraception may in part reflect “mal être” towards their fat body. <br />It may also reflect reluctance on the part of health care professionals to prescribe oestro-progestative contraceptives for obese women because of concerns over increased risk of cardio-vascular accidents<br />The lower prescription of oestro-progestative contraceptives for obese women does not seem to be compensated by greater use progestin-only methods<br />

×