2013 datwyler training 3 fibre intro - info tech middle east

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2013 datwyler training 3 fibre intro - info tech middle east2013 datwyler training 3 fibre intro - info tech middle east

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  • IEEE – Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    ISO – International Organization for Standardization
    IEC – International Electrotechnical Commission
    TIA – Telecommunications Industry Association
    EIA – Electronic Industries Alliance
    CENELEC – European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization
    (French: Comité Européen de Normalisation Électrotechnique)
  • 2013 datwyler training 3 fibre intro - info tech middle east

    1. 1. Datwyler Cables Introduction to Fibre
    2. 2. Paul Hunter – UK Technical Manager  Thomas Gehrke (Munich – Germany)  Pius Albisser (Altdorf – Switzerland)
    3. 3. Fibre Cables Manufacturing facilities Altdorf (cables, cable harnessing) Raw Fibre Corning Manufacturing Plant Switzerland (Altdorf) total 100’000 m2 Cables produced per year (Cu and FO): >140’000 km Altdorf headquarters (Switzerland)
    4. 4. What is Optical Fibre? (General info)
    5. 5.  Optical Fibre is essentially a medium in which to send large amounts of information down a single channel at very high speeds.  Utilises Hard Clad Silica glass to carry pulses of light (which represents the information transmitted) over short or potentially very long distances
    6. 6. Fibre optics system Transmitter Receiver Splice Splice tray Connector Patch Cord Underground ducting Joint enclosure Splice Tray Cable Splice tray Underground ducting
    7. 7. What are the advantages of using Fibre?
    8. 8.  Distance  Capacity/Bandwidth  Security  Immunity to Noise  Negligible Crosstalk  Safety  Long Life  Light Weight  Small Cross Section  Low Cost  Environmentally Friendly  Future Proof?
    9. 9. What are the disadvantages of using Fibre?
    10. 10.  Fragile  Equipment cost  New Skills/Technology  Limitations to Carry Power
    11. 11. Multimode and Singlemode  Multimode – MM  Building cabling  Larger cross-sectional area  Short distances  Singlemode  Campus or long haul  Smaller cross-sectional area  Long distances
    12. 12. Transmission of light though Optical Fibre?
    13. 13. Propagation of Light in a Step Index Fibre Diameter Reflection n n1 = 1,470 n2 = 1,460 Refraction
    14. 14. Numerical Aperture n1 n2 NA = sin α = (n1)2 - (n2)2
    15. 15. Reflexion Optical plummet n1 ≠ n2 αΕ n1 αR n = c/vM n = refractive index n2 Law of reflexion αE = αR
    16. 16. Optical plummet Law of Snellius Refraction n1 > n2 αΕ sin α E ∗ n1= sin α B ∗ n2 E=R+T n1 n2 αΒ
    17. 17. Numerical Aperture = NA (Angel of acceptance qmax) Low NA - Less light - Higher bandwidth - E.g. G50/125 µm High NA - More light - Low bandwidth - E.g. G62.5/125 µm
    18. 18. Differential Mode Delay Results: Ideal for an optical input signal Misshaped optical output signal -The receiver is not capable of detecting a single bit -Increase of BER -Decrease of data rate, and velocity of the transmission - In extreme cases, the transmission is lost
    19. 19. Graded Index of Profile Fiber (Instead of Stepped index) Exponent of Profile g=2-Δ 3 r 1 rK 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 2 0
    20. 20. Introduction Standards for FO Cabling
    21. 21. General Standards IEEE Standards Association ISO/IEC is worldwide applicable and valid TIA/EIA is valid for North America (mainly the USA) EN (CENELEC) is valid throughout Europe
    22. 22. ISO/IEC – ISO/IEC is applicable worldwide and valid in the Middle East – Generic Premise Cabling – Currently we have five all-silica optical fibre “types” or “Categories” specified in the generic cabling standards. – Internationally, ISO/IEC 11801 specifies OM1, OM2, OM3 and OS1. In addition, ISO/IEC 24702 (Generic cabling for industrial premises) specifies OS2. – See also IEC 60794
    23. 23. IEC 86A : FO Cables IEC 60794 IEC 60794 Optical Fiber Cables IEC 60794-1 IEC 60794-1 Generic specification IEC 60794-2 IEC 60794-2 Indoor cables IEC 60794-3 IEC 60794-3 External cables IEC 60794-4 IEC 60794-4 Aerial optical cables
    24. 24. EN (Cenelec) – EN (CENELEC) is valid throughout Europe – Generic Premise Cabling – EN 50173-1 contains all the cable specifications and recognized that Category OS2 cabled optical fibre (being of an external style cable construction with low cabled attenuation) may frequently be jointed to Category OS1
    25. 25. TIA/EIA – TIA/EIA is valid for North America (mainly the USA) – Generic Premise Cabling – TIA/EIA 568-B (Revision of TIA/EIA-568-A) 27
    26. 26. TIA/EIA – ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.3 – · ANSI/EIA/TIA-455-A-1991, – Standard Test Procedures for FO Cables and Transducers, Sensors, Connecting and Terminating Devices, and other components – · ANSI/ICEA S-83-596-1994, – Fibre Optic Premises Distribution Cable – · ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2000, – Fibre Optic Outside Plant Communications Cable – · ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7-1998, – Optical Power Loss Measurements of Installed Single-mode Fibre Cable Plant-OFSTP-7
    27. 27. Generic Cabling Structure (Fibre optic type and construction)
    28. 28. Fibre Structure  Core  62.5 microns  50 microns  9 microns (single-mode)  Cladding  125 microns  Coating  250 microns SM  900 microns MM Primary coating Cladding Core
    29. 29. Typical fibre dimensions 8/125 Fibre  9/125  50/125 Core: 9 µm  62.5/125 62.5/125 Fibre Core: 62.5m Primary coating: 250 µm Cladding: 125 µm 50/125 Fibre Primary coating: 250 µm Cladding: 125 µm Core: 50 µm Primary coating: 250 µm Cladding: 125 µm
    30. 30. Multimode Fibre Transmission Standards 100 Mb Ethernet 1 Gb (1000 Mb) Ethernet 10 Gb Ethernet 40 Gb Ethernet 100 Gb Ethernet OM1 (62.5/125) 2 km 275 m 33 m Not Supported Not Supported OM2 (50/125) 2 km 550 m 82 m Not Supported Not Supported OM3 (50/125) 2 km 800 m 300 m 100 m 100 m OM4 (50/125) 2 km 1100 m 550 m 125 m 125 m Multi-mode optical fibre (multimode fibre or MM fibre) is a type of optical fibre mostly used for communication over short distances, such as within a building or on a campus. Typical multimode links have data rates of 10 Mb/s to 10 Gb/s over link lengths of up to 400 meters—more than sufficient for the majority of premises applications
    31. 31. Multimode Fibre Transmission Standards Max Attenuation Bandwidth (MHz / Km) 850nm 1300nm 850nm 1300nm Laser OM1 (62.5/125) 1.5dB 3.5dB 200 500 Not Specified OM2 (50/125) 1.5dB 3.5dB 500 500 Not Specified OM3 (50/125) 1.5dB 3.5dB 1500 500 2000 OM4 (50/125) 1.5dB 3.5dB 3500 500 4700 Attenuation of each fibre is shown on the relevant ‘Data sheet’
    32. 32. Singlemode Fibre Max Attenuation Bandwidth (MHz / Km) Transmission Standards 1310nm 1550nm 1310nm 1550nm OS1 (9/125) 1.0dB 1.0dB HIGH! ~100 Terahertz HIGH! ~100 Terahertz OS2 (9/125) 0.4dB 0.4dB HIGH! ~100 Terahertz HIGH! ~100 Terahertz Single mode fibres can run distances >40km
    33. 33. Main Connector Types
    34. 34. ST - Straight Tip
    35. 35. SC – Subscriber connector
    36. 36. LC – Lucent Connector
    37. 37. MTRJ
    38. 38. E2000/APC
    39. 39. Termination types  Pigtail  Splicing  Mechanical  Fusion  Direct termination  Hot melt  Cold cure  (Polish)  Pre-termination  MTP/MPO  All types – 1-2 metre 0.5dB loss 0.1dB loss 0.75dB loss 0.75dB loss Improved dB loss More expensive Quicker on site
    40. 40. Calculating Power budget
    41. 41. Power Budget Attenuation Multimode Optical Fibre (OM1, 2 & 3) @850nm = 3.5 dB/km max @1300nm = 1.5dB/km max Singlemode Fibre (OS1) @1310nm = 1.0 dB/km @1550nm = 1.0 dB/km
    42. 42. Power Budget 0.5 dB 0.30 dB 0.5 dB 10,87% Patchkabel 0.5 dB 10,87% 6,67% 10,87% 100% 89,13% a = -10 x lg Paus Pein 79,4% a = -10*lg 0,6608 1 74% = 1,799 dB = 1,8dB = 66,08%
    43. 43. Summary of FO Cabling High bandwidth High data rates Low attenuation Ideal NEXT No problems with EMC No earthing problems Little dimension Low mass Long life cycle
    44. 44. Coffee Break Dätwyler Holding AG Gotthardstrasse 31, 6460 Altdorf T +41 41 875 11 00, F + 41 41 875 12 05 info@daetwyler.ch, www.daetwyler.ch

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