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Event marketing motivation ,promotion and pricing policies in event marketing

Event marketing motivation ,promotion and pricing policies in event marketing

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Event marketing motivation ,promotion and pricing policies in event marketing

  1. 1. EVENT MARKETING Motivation ,Promotion and Pricing Policies in Event Marketing Presented By Anandan.B Sadique Ali.V.K
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION  An event may provide a service (musical entertainment) alongside physical goods (food and drink).  Services and goods combine to create experiences.  It is the experience, that the event consumer is buying.  Events appeal to different people and every consumer has their own individual makeup.
  3. 3.  Marketing enables event organisers to capture customer data and understand what motivates event attendance.  It also allows customers to tell event organisers their dislike in order to improve future events.  Marketers need to understand what motivates consumers to attend events in order to create, improve and market events effectively by selecting appropriate marketing channels and deploying the right marketing mix in the design of an integrated marketing campaign.  Marketers create the desire to purchase by placing stimuli in marketing communications that appeal to the personal characteristics of the customers.
  4. 4. EVENT MOTIVATION
  5. 5. Motivations and Event Attendance  Motivations play a key role in the decision making process, that determines which events consumers will attend.  Everyone has a distinct and different motivations as to which event to attend when and where.  In order to examine the motivations of people to attend events, two different approaches can be adopted - extrinsic and intrinsic motivation.  Extrinsic motivation results from influences external to the person  Whereas intrinsic motivation includes the personal need of the individual themselves
  6. 6. Extrinsic Motivations  Work and Leisure: People attend event to get some relaxation from their hectic schedules or routines and hence people seek stimulation through attending events to add some colour to their life  Social Determiners: Social factors extend a combined influence. They can be classified as cultural, social and personal.  Cultural: Race, religion, sexual, geographic factors  Social: Family, status, friends and colleagues, educational professional standing etc.  Personal: Age, lifestyle, occupation, economic circumstances and personality etc.
  7. 7. Intrinsic Motivation  Intrinsic motivations can generally be categorised into two main characteristics – Push and Pull factors.  Push Factors: The factors intrinsic to a person which influences him to make a purchase decision is called push factors.  They are internal factors and are person specific.  The push factors are those that the attendees see as a means to satisfy a desire or need like to relax, to experience nostalgia, to gain new information, thrill , excitement etc.  Pull Factors : That are the destination itself or the attractions cited there that are so appealing that they pull an individuals to themselves. They may be tangible factors such as climate, food and drink, actual entertainment, artists performing etc.
  8. 8.  Excitement/Thrills: Doing something, which is stimulating and exciting, and appeals to the creative mind.  Escape: Getting away from the usual demands of life and having a change from daily routine.  Extent novelty: Experiencing new and different things and attending an event that is unique. The promoter of the event needs to keep these five basic needs of people in mind and design a promotional kit according to these so that it appeals to the audience, which the event targets.
  9. 9.  A study of customers at a community festival reported that the Five Principal Need Satisfiers for attending events are  Socialization: To be with friends or people who are enjoying themselves and people who enjoy the same things.  Family Togetherness: Seeking the opportunity so that the family can enjoy together and to bring the family together. Need Satisfiers for attending events
  10. 10. EVENT PROMOTION
  11. 11.  In the world of marketing, 'promotion' generally refers to a one-off event that provides a stimulus for the public to buy a service or product  It uses all the marketing techniques. As it is project based, it has a definite life span.  promotion is strongly linked to the reputation of the organizing company, sponsors and other stakeholders as well as the actual programme or event content.  event promotion must be dynamic and able to respond to opportunities as they arise. PROMOTION -Introduction
  12. 12. I. Advertising  Advertising is the controlled method of communicating the message. The event manager can manipulate the message. It includes:  Give-aways: leaflets, posters, brochures  Radio: commercial, national  Internet: websites,  Television: cable, free to air, satellite  Press: newspapers, magazines  Non media alternatives: outdoor advertising, street banners.  Advertising can be done by the event manager or if the event and promotional campaign is too big, by an appointed advertising agency, Tools of Promotion
  13. 13.  II. Public Relations  PR is different from advertising in that it is not self- praise. It communicates a more complex message than advertising.  It is free but the event manager looses control over the result.  The publicity can be positive or negative. To this end, it is important that the event manager maintains control over as much of the public relation as possible. Tools of Promotion
  14. 14.  Press release:  A press release is used to generate coverage in the media, T.V, radio, newspaper and specialist publication (as news story), to get the event free media coverage.  The press release should be written on company letterhead as a news report and after e-mailing to the media, followed up with a phone call.
  15. 15.  III. Direct marketing  This is delivering the promotional message straight to the interested individual.  The basis of direct marketing is the establishment of a data bank and a strategy to best reach those individuals.  The database can be created through previous competitions, guest books, inquiries, point of sale information or just by asking the participants if they would like to receive information on other similar events.  The mail out is the most common traditional method. Tools of Promotion
  16. 16. IV. Word of mouth  For some event managers the promotion strategy is just by word of mouth. They concentrate on the quality of their programme and site. This builds up a loyal following.  V. Hospitality  As part of the promotional kit, hospitality can be a powerful motivator. The special event or festival has to promote itself to the sponsors. The dinner for sponsors, for example, can be an inexpensive way to promote the event. A tour of the site can be an effective way to promote an event. Tools of Promotion
  17. 17.  VI. Websites  The latest and increasingly popular method of promoting an event is to create a website.  The advantage is that the site can also capture enquiries and be a point of sale for tickets.  The current movement towards virtual reality sites can give the potential attendee a view of the event.  The site can give real information, such as the program and a map.  A web site can be used to distribute photos and press releases. Tools of Promotion
  18. 18.  5. E-communications : E-mail, and social networking sites as a part of an integrated communications strategy is key to developing deeper, richer and meaningful interactions with existing and potential customers.  Social networking sites are creating huge on-line communities, enabling marketers to reach customers easily, cheaply and in a very focussed way, but also offers a semi-tangible legacy to an event days, weeks, months and even years after the event has taken place.
  19. 19. Pricing Policies 1. Penetration Policy: Deliberate low price setting to maximise the sales at a low profit. 2. Economy Strategy: For budget events where costs to the customers are low and organisers probably look at outside funding for the event. 3. Premium Policy: Ticket prices are high and so is the value to the audience 4. Psychological Pricing: It is about trying to get the customers to respond emotionally to prices. E.g. Rs.499 looks better than 500.
  20. 20. Conclusion  In this presentation we described about the various technique like motivation , promotion and various pricing policies that can apply for event management marketing.  Marketers need to understand what motivates consumers to attend events in order to create, improve and market events effectively by selecting appropriate marketing channels and deploying the right marketing mix in the design of an integrated marketing campaign.  These methods will helps to achieve marketing goals . marketing enables event organizers to capture customer data and understand what motivates event attendance.
  21. 21. THANK YOU

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