Agenda
• Sentence Structure Presentation
• Your Turn! – Practice Identifying Sentence
Types.
• Discussion – Anxiety
• Clos...
Sentence Types
Types
• Depending on the number and types of clauses
they contain, sentences are classified as simple,
compound, complex o...
Simple Sentences Part I
• A simple sentence is one independent clause with
no subordinate clauses.
• Alisa made a Powerpoi...
Simple Sentences Part II
• A simple sentence may contain compound
elements – a compound subject, verb, or
object, for exam...
Death by Chocolate
Compound Sentence
• A compound sentence is composed of two or
more independent clauses with no
subordinate clauses. The in...
Complex Sentences
• A complex sentence is composed of one
independent clause with one or more
subordinate clauses.
• If yo...
Compound-complex sentences
• A compound complex sentence contains at least
two independent clauses and at least one
subord...
Your Turn!
Practice
• Read the first paragraph of Anxiety. Identify
each sentence as Simple, Compound,
Complex, or Compound-Complex.
...
Results
• 1) Simple. Surprised? The first part is a
prepositional phrase modifying the noun (and
subject) “chance.” There ...
• 2) Compound Sentence = two independent
clauses, in this case joined with a comma and
a FANBOYS.
• My roommate’s father w...
• 3) Compound-complex= at least two
independent clauses and at least one
subordinate clause.
• Ted said he would go if he ...
Group Work
In your groups, discuss the following
questions:
• What is one key thing you annotated and
why? What does your annotation ...
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Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12

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Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12

  1. 1. Agenda • Sentence Structure Presentation • Your Turn! – Practice Identifying Sentence Types. • Discussion – Anxiety • Closing • Homework: 1) Find Potential Source Number 3; do summary exercise. • 2) Work on E.E. Intro and/or E.J.R. #2
  2. 2. Sentence Types
  3. 3. Types • Depending on the number and types of clauses they contain, sentences are classified as simple, compound, complex or compound-complex. • REMEMBER: Clauses come in two varieties: independent and subordinate. An independent clause has a subject, verb and expresses a complete thought. It could be its own sentence. • A subordinate clause has a subject and a verb, but it does not express a complete thought and is therefore dependent on (or subordinate to) the independent clause.
  4. 4. Simple Sentences Part I • A simple sentence is one independent clause with no subordinate clauses. • Alisa made a Powerpoint presentation. • Without a passport, Eva could not visit her parents in Lima. • “Without a passport” is a prepositional phrase modifying the proper noun Eva. It is not a subordinate clause because it has neither subject nor verb.
  5. 5. Simple Sentences Part II • A simple sentence may contain compound elements – a compound subject, verb, or object, for example. The following sentence is simple because its two verbs (comes in and goes out) share a subject (Spring). • Spring comes in and goes out like a lion.
  6. 6. Death by Chocolate
  7. 7. Compound Sentence • A compound sentence is composed of two or more independent clauses with no subordinate clauses. The independent clauses are joined by a comma and a FANBOYS or a semicolon. • The car broke down, but a rescue van arrived within minutes. • A shark was spotted near shore; people left immediately.
  8. 8. Complex Sentences • A complex sentence is composed of one independent clause with one or more subordinate clauses. • If you leave late, take a cab home. • Spoiler alert: Alisa doesn’t like the second example on p. 379. Ignore it.
  9. 9. Compound-complex sentences • A compound complex sentence contains at least two independent clauses and at least one subordinate clause. The following sentence contains two independent clauses, each of which contains a subordinate clause. • Tell the doctor how you feel, and she will decide whether you can go home. • Spoiler alert: subordinate clauses can appear next to and even within an independent clause without a comma to separate them.
  10. 10. Your Turn!
  11. 11. Practice • Read the first paragraph of Anxiety. Identify each sentence as Simple, Compound, Complex, or Compound-Complex. • You can work alone or with a partner. • Spoiler alert: the first sentence is sneaky.
  12. 12. Results • 1) Simple. Surprised? The first part is a prepositional phrase modifying the noun (and subject) “chance.” There is a compound verb (“came up” and “to spend”) but it shares a subject “chance.” We have a verbal “working” and an adverbial phrase “on a ranch in Argentina.” • There are lots of compound elements in this sentence, but it still has only one independent clause and no subordinate clauses.
  13. 13. • 2) Compound Sentence = two independent clauses, in this case joined with a comma and a FANBOYS. • My roommate’s father was in the cattle business, and he wanted Ted to see something of it.
  14. 14. • 3) Compound-complex= at least two independent clauses and at least one subordinate clause. • Ted said he would go if he could take a friend, and he chose me.
  15. 15. Group Work
  16. 16. In your groups, discuss the following questions: • What is one key thing you annotated and why? What does your annotation say about your sensibilities as a person/reader/writer? • What particular insight did you feel Collier provided about life and/or writing? • What function do paragraphs 17-19 serve in Collier’s essay?

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