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14 file handling

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14 file handling

  1. 1. File Handling OOSSE - Programming with Java Lecture A1Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 1
  2. 2. Objectives In this lecture, we will: – learn how to read data from a file – learn how to write data to a file – discuss the structure of a program which uses filesDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 2
  3. 3. Why use files? • In all the programs we have written so far, any data we need has been either – hard coded into the program String name = "Cathy"; – or read in from the keyboard using a Scanner object Scanner kybd = new Scanner(System.in); System.out.println("What is your name?"); name = kybd.next(); • It is tedious to type in all the data to be processed each time the program is run • It is not very useful if the data and results cannot be saved – imagine a payroll program where all information about the employees has to be entered each time the program is runDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 3
  4. 4. Opening a file to read from • A Scanner object can be set up to read from a file – so far all our Scanner objects have read from the keyboard • The name of the file to read from is required • First create a File object corresponding to this file – need to import java.io.* – this is a library of java classes for input and output • Then create a Scanner object using the File object as the source of the input – instead of System.in • If the input file is in the same directory as the Java program it makes life easier – if the file is not found, there will be an error (exception) when the program runsDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 4
  5. 5. Reading from a file import java.util.*; import java.io.*; public class Payroll { public static void main(String args[]) { String fName = "payroll.txt"; Scanner inFile = new Scanner(new File(fName)); …… or Scanner inFile = new Scanner(new File("payroll.txt"));Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 5
  6. 6. Reading from Scanner objects • Once the Scanner object is created, we can use its methods to read from the file – just like when reading from the keyboard String name = inFile.next(); double hourlyPay = inFile.nextDouble(); • Multiple Scanner objects can be created, as long as they are given different names – for example, to read from two different files – or from a file and the keyboard Scanner kybd = new Scanner(System.in); Scanner inFile = new Scanner(new File(fName));Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 6
  7. 7. Reading from a file • The hasNext() method is useful when you do not know how much data is in the file – returns true if there is more data to read – returns false if you have reached the end of the file • It can be used in a while loop to process all the data in the file • Imagine a text file is available where each line contains information about one employee: – name (as a String) – followed by hourly pay (as a double) • For example the file could contain the data Nick 4.95 Fred 5.94 Dave 9.45 • The code overleaf would process all the data in turnDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 7
  8. 8. Reading all the data in a file while (inFile.hasNext()) { name = inFile.next(); hourlyPay = inFile.nextDouble(); System.out.println("Hours worked by "+name+"?"); hoursWorked = kybd.nextInt(); double pay = hourlyPay * hoursWorked; System.out.println("Pay is " + pay); } inFile.close();Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 8
  9. 9. Closing a file • When you have finished reading from a file, you should close it • A file is closed by calling the close() method of the Scanner object that was set up to read the file inFile.close();Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 9
  10. 10. Tips for Input Files • Decide on the format of the data – repeating rows of • name (as a String) • followed by hourly pay (as a double) • Make sure the information is – in the correct order – of the correct type • to match the input statements in your program • Any text editor can be used to create and edit the file • or it could be output from a program – which writes to the file using the correct formatDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 10
  11. 11. Writing to a file• The name of the file to write to is required• First create a PrintWriter object for this file – need to import java.io.* – same library of java classes as FileReader• Typically the output file will be in the same directory as the Java program• If a file of this name already exists – it will be opened – all the data currently in the file will be lost• If the file does not already exist, a new one will be created PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter("Payroll.txt");Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 11
  12. 12. Writing to a file • Once the PrintWriter object is created, we can use its methods to write to the file – can use print(), println(), printf() – just like when writing to the console output window • For example to print an employee’s data on one line pw.print(name); pw.printf("%6.2f", hourlyPay); pw.println(); • Close the PrintWriter when you have finished writing to the file pw.close();Dec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 12
  13. 13. Structure of a program that uses files • A program which reads data from a file may do a lot of processing on it – do calculations (totals, averages) – add to it (input by user) – delete some of it – sort it – search all of it for a particular data value • It is awkward to search for and retrieve only the required data from a sequential file for each process • and to write changes back to the original fileDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 13
  14. 14. Structure of a program that uses files • It is sometimes better to – open the input file – read all the data in the file into an appropriate data structure • such as an array, or several arrays – close the input file • Do all the processing in memory, then write the final version of the data to a file – either with the same name as the input file • original data is lost – or a new file • Most of the program (data structures, processing) is the same as when all the data is entered via the keyboard – just add the file-reading code at the beginning of the program – and the file-writing code at the endDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 14
  15. 15. Files and Exceptions • File handling is one area that is prone to things going wrong – A file may not exist – A file may not be accessible – The format of the data in the file may be incorrect • Whenever dealing with files it is best to make use of try catch blocks to handle any exceptions – Try to anticipate what could go wrongDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 15
  16. 16. Summary In this lecture we have: • learned how to read data from a file • learned how to write data to a file • discussed the structure of a program which uses filesDec 21, 2012 OOSSE - Java Lecture A1 16

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