Ground Rules:  Clarifying and Enacting Moral Purpose for Excellence in Leadership and Mentor Practice <ul><li>Claudia Hero...
Introductions <ul><li>At your table groups, briefly introduce yourselves, sharing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your name </li></...
Ground Rules Clarifying and Enacting Moral Purpose for Excellence in Leadership and Mentor Practice Alison Kreider & Claud...
On what moral principles is my mentor or leadership practice premised?
Do my actions and words clearly embody these moral principles?
In what ways can I be more intentional about enacting moral purpose in my work every day?
Agenda <ul><li>Moral Purpose and Relational Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Write and share about the moral purpose that guides ou...
Outcomes <ul><li>Clarify the moral purpose(s) that inform our work. </li></ul><ul><li>Make decisions about how to enact ou...
Norms for Collaboration <ul><li>Equity of Voice </li></ul><ul><li>Active Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for All Persp...
Relational Trust <ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Regard </li></ul><ul><li>Integrit...
Relational Trust  <ul><li>Reduces vulnerability and encourages risk taking. </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates public problem s...
Relational Trust Matters <ul><li>Schools with strong relational trust had a  1 in 2  chance of making significant improvem...
Relational Trust <ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Regard </li></ul><ul><li>Integrit...
<ul><li>Trust,  n. </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity,  n. </li></ul>
<ul><li>Trust,  n. </li></ul><ul><li>reliance on the integrity, justice, etc.,  </li></ul><ul><li>of a person; confidence....
<ul><li>Integrity,  n. </li></ul><ul><li>soundness of moral principle and  </li></ul><ul><li>character; uprightness; hones...
<ul><li>Moral Principle or  </li></ul><ul><li>Moral Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Deciding on our personal rules for right con...
Personal Examples <ul><li>All interactions hold the possibility for learning. </li></ul><ul><li>A teacher’s time is valuab...
<ul><li>“ The most important thing to know is that the combination of moral purpose and relational trust generates the whe...
Silent Write <ul><li>What fundamental principles or moral purpose guides my work? </li></ul>
Moving Share and Listen <ul><li>Circulate </li></ul><ul><li>Pair up </li></ul><ul><li>Share </li></ul><ul><li>Listen </li>...
Clarifying Moral Purpose <ul><li>Choose and refine one fundamental principle or moral purpose to work with in more depth f...
<ul><li>“ To a large extent, moral commitments explain the decisions people make and the behavior they exhibit. ”   </li><...
Enacting Moral Purpose - Activity
Consider… <ul><li>What intentional actions do I make? </li></ul><ul><li>What are my spoken statements? </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Enacting Moral Purpose - Example “ Was this useful for you?” “ Thank you for your time.” “ What is your thought on how we ...
Enacting Moral Purpose - Example “ thank you for sharing” “ I appreciate you sharing that with me…” Intentionally choosing...
Mentoring Techniques <ul><li>Paying Attention to Self and Others </li></ul><ul><li>Holding Positive Presuppositions </li><...
Enacting Moral Purpose - Activity
Enactment Activity - Trios Share <ul><li>A volunteer shares their notes on moral purpose and actions/words. </li></ul><ul>...
Intention-Driven Action <ul><li>“ The choices we make and the actions we take are increasingly effective when they are con...
Examples of intentions <ul><li>Before I start the car,  I intend to have a safe ride to work. </li></ul><ul><li>Before I e...
Setting an Intention My Intention is… <ul><li>Compose a succinct, one sentence intention towards enacting your moral purpo...
<ul><li>“ When we see ourselves as acting from intention, we can begin to see everyone we meet as a person acting from int...
“… deep down, we know what motivates and what inspires, but to tap these resources of motivation more fully we must embark...
Continue the Conversation <ul><li>www.moralpurpose.blogspot.com </li></ul><ul><li>Claudia Heron </li></ul><ul><li>[email_a...
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NTC Conference: Ground Rules.Final

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  • An effective mentor relationship is grounded in clear moral purpose that is enacted in mentor practice.
  • An effective mentor relationship is grounded in clear moral purpose that is enacted in mentor practice.
  • An effective mentor relationship is grounded in clear moral purpose that is enacted in mentor practice.
  • Write up norms lingo Suspend inner dialogue as we are exploring our moral beliefs Requires us to honor the other person Cell phones/laptops/distractions
  • Insert Claudia’s here! Tag Team
  • Circulate around the room. When you make eye contact with someone you haven’t spoken to yet, pair up. Refrain from introductions - simply share your moral purpose with each other. Listen. After each partner shares, pause then move on to another participant. When the bell sounds, add your moral purpose to the idea chain.
  • Sitting quietly, reflect on what you heard from others in the room. What did you hear that resonates with you? Is there anything you want to add or simplify to refine your fundamental belief? Select one and live with it - go deeper with it. Consider a meaningful reason for choosing.
  • “ To a large extent, moral commitments explain the decisions people make and the behavior they exhibit. ”
  • In the next piece, we will be working with a graphic organizer to think through how your guiding principle is enacted or may be enacted. We will work in trios. Before we move into the trios, let’s look at a sample and give you some time to collect your own thoughts about your guiding principle. Here’s a sample - now write - 5 minutes and add 2 if necessary. After writing, now move in trios.
  • As we go into what we do - of course, this is our toolbox, and they may inform
  • In the next piece, we will be working with a graphic organizer to think through how your guiding principle is enacted or may be enacted. We will work in trios. Before we move into the trios, let’s look at a sample and give you some time to collect your own thoughts about your guiding principle. Here’s a sample - now write - 5 minutes and add 2 if necessary. After writing, now move in trios.
  • ADD ANECDOTE - got something out of that! You each have three blank organizers - one will be to gather your own thoughts and reflections to share with the group. The other two will be for you to jot down brief thoughts or notes when you are listening to the other people in your trio. If time after, debrief for up to 5 minutes.
  • Come back to this -- different ways to write them
  • As you write an intention here it needs to be specific This is for a discreet amount of time These are situational intentions about our work - by focusing on them, it is more likely that the action step will actually happen I set an intentin right before I go into a meeting - intention choices…give anecdotes.
  • NTC Conference: Ground Rules.Final

    1. 1. Ground Rules: Clarifying and Enacting Moral Purpose for Excellence in Leadership and Mentor Practice <ul><li>Claudia Heron </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Alison Kreider </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
    2. 2. Introductions <ul><li>At your table groups, briefly introduce yourselves, sharing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your current professional role </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One thing that inspires you about the work that you do. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are there commonalities or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>recurrent themes in your group? </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Ground Rules Clarifying and Enacting Moral Purpose for Excellence in Leadership and Mentor Practice Alison Kreider & Claudia Heron Lead Mentors, New Teacher Support & Development, Oakland Unified 12th Annual New Teacher Center Symposium
    4. 4. On what moral principles is my mentor or leadership practice premised?
    5. 5. Do my actions and words clearly embody these moral principles?
    6. 6. In what ways can I be more intentional about enacting moral purpose in my work every day?
    7. 7. Agenda <ul><li>Moral Purpose and Relational Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Write and share about the moral purpose that guides our work - Interactive </li></ul><ul><li>Choose one moral purpose to reflect on more deeply in small groups - Trios </li></ul><ul><li>Set and share an intention </li></ul>
    8. 8. Outcomes <ul><li>Clarify the moral purpose(s) that inform our work. </li></ul><ul><li>Make decisions about how to enact our moral purpose(s) in our day-to-day practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in sharing the values, beliefs, and actions that guide our professional lives. </li></ul>By the close of this session, we will…
    9. 9. Norms for Collaboration <ul><li>Equity of Voice </li></ul><ul><li>Active Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for All Perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Maximize Time and Attention </li></ul><ul><li>- drawn from The New Teacher Center & Laura Lipton and Bruce Wellman </li></ul>
    10. 10. Relational Trust <ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Regard </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Anthony Bryk & Barbara Schneider </li></ul><ul><li>Trust in Schools: A Core Resource for Improvement </li></ul>
    11. 11. Relational Trust <ul><li>Reduces vulnerability and encourages risk taking. </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates public problem solving. </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes a professional community of mutual support. </li></ul><ul><li>Creates a moral resource for school improvement. </li></ul><ul><li>Influences belief in the organization’s mission. </li></ul><ul><li>Bryk & Schneider, Trust in Schools (p. 116-117) </li></ul>
    12. 12. Relational Trust Matters <ul><li>Schools with strong relational trust had a 1 in 2 chance of making significant improvements in reading and mathematics. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools with weak relational trust had a 1 in 7 chance of making improvement ONLY IF these schools strengthened trust over the course of the multi-year study. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools with poor relational trust did not improve and had almost no chance of making academic improvements in either reading or mathematics. </li></ul><ul><li>Bryk & Schneider, Trust in Schools (p. 111) </li></ul>
    13. 13. Relational Trust <ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Regard </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Anthony Bryk & Barbara Schneider </li></ul><ul><li>Trust in Schools: A Core Resource for Improvement </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Trust, n. </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity, n. </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Trust, n. </li></ul><ul><li>reliance on the integrity, justice, etc., </li></ul><ul><li>of a person; confidence. </li></ul><ul><li>~ The American College Dictionary </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Integrity, n. </li></ul><ul><li>soundness of moral principle and </li></ul><ul><li>character; uprightness; honesty. </li></ul><ul><li>~ The American College Dictionary </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Moral Principle or </li></ul><ul><li>Moral Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Deciding on our personal rules for right conduct within our professional lives. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Personal Examples <ul><li>All interactions hold the possibility for learning. </li></ul><ul><li>A teacher’s time is valuable and mentoring sessions should maximize time for learning. </li></ul><ul><li>All teachers and all students are learners. </li></ul><ul><li>Mentoring is collaborative and is meaningful when insight and professional skill is advanced. </li></ul><ul><li>If I make a commitment, I will follow through. </li></ul><ul><li>Students are at the center of the work. </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>“ The most important thing to know is that the combination of moral purpose and relational trust generates the wherewithal to go the extra mile. It makes a complex, difficult journey worthwhile and doable.” </li></ul><ul><li>Michael Fullan </li></ul><ul><li>The Moral Imperative of School Leadership </li></ul>
    20. 20. Silent Write <ul><li>What fundamental principles or moral purpose guides my work? </li></ul>
    21. 21. Moving Share and Listen <ul><li>Circulate </li></ul><ul><li>Pair up </li></ul><ul><li>Share </li></ul><ul><li>Listen </li></ul><ul><li>Pause </li></ul><ul><li>Circulate… </li></ul>
    22. 22. Clarifying Moral Purpose <ul><li>Choose and refine one fundamental principle or moral purpose to work with in more depth for the </li></ul><ul><li>next activity. </li></ul>
    23. 23. <ul><li>“ To a large extent, moral commitments explain the decisions people make and the behavior they exhibit. ” </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas J. Sergiovanni </li></ul><ul><li>Moral Leadership </li></ul>
    24. 24. Enacting Moral Purpose - Activity
    25. 25. Consider… <ul><li>What intentional actions do I make? </li></ul><ul><li>What are my spoken statements? </li></ul><ul><li>What are my unspoken statements? </li></ul><ul><li>Do they align with my moral purpose? </li></ul>
    26. 26. Enacting Moral Purpose - Example “ Was this useful for you?” “ Thank you for your time.” “ What is your thought on how we can make best use of the time during our next session?” Be on time. Sit down. Focus on attending fully - active listening. Facilitate focus on task at hand. Come to meaningful and achievable next steps. Eliminate distractions (phones, laptops) A teacher’s time is valuable and mentoring time should be maximized for learning. What does it sound like? What words? What does it look like? What actions? Guiding Principle or Moral Purpose
    27. 27. Enacting Moral Purpose - Example “ thank you for sharing” “ I appreciate you sharing that with me…” Intentionally choosing not to say much=holding silence Silence = Pause (Facilitates thinking) Active listening Holding positive presuppositions Asking clarifying questions Not rushing (when people are given a chance to speak their knowledge/ insights emerge) All interactions hold the possibility for learning What does it sound like? What words? What does it look like? What actions? Guiding Principle or Moral Purpose
    28. 28. Mentoring Techniques <ul><li>Paying Attention to Self and Others </li></ul><ul><li>Holding Positive Presuppositions </li></ul><ul><li>Pausing </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrasing </li></ul><ul><li>Clarifying </li></ul><ul><li>Focusing on Evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Suspending Judgment </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing Responsibility </li></ul>
    29. 29. Enacting Moral Purpose - Activity
    30. 30. Enactment Activity - Trios Share <ul><li>A volunteer shares their notes on moral purpose and actions/words. </li></ul><ul><li>Listening partners attend fully - gathering notes/thoughts on extra graphic organizer. </li></ul><ul><li>After volunteer shares, have a conversation with your group about what resonates, what can be added, what’s missing, ideas for next steps, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>After about 5 minutes switch. </li></ul>
    31. 31. Intention-Driven Action <ul><li>“ The choices we make and the actions we take are increasingly effective when they are consciously connected to clear intentions. Mindfulness of the intention …is an important function of a learning-focused relationship. </li></ul><ul><li>Laura Lipton and Bruce Wellman </li></ul><ul><li>Mentoring Matters </li></ul>
    32. 32. Examples of intentions <ul><li>Before I start the car, I intend to have a safe ride to work. </li></ul><ul><li>Before I engage with a mentee, I intend to learn something new or be helpful. </li></ul><ul><li>Before entering a meeting with a mentee, I intend to keep the conversation focused on tangible next steps. </li></ul><ul><li>Before the meeting begins, I intend to be calm. </li></ul><ul><li>Before I get out of bed, I intend to have a productive day. </li></ul>
    33. 33. Setting an Intention My Intention is… <ul><li>Compose a succinct, one sentence intention towards enacting your moral purpose. </li></ul><ul><li>Write your intention on the provided cards at your tables. </li></ul><ul><li>Share intentions when prompted. </li></ul>
    34. 34. <ul><li>“ When we see ourselves as acting from intention, we can begin to see everyone we meet as a person acting from intention, themselves. With this view, we establish community, trust, and support for each other in our efforts. ” </li></ul><ul><li>Paul Haller </li></ul><ul><li>Public lecture, San Francisco Zen Center </li></ul>
    35. 35. “… deep down, we know what motivates and what inspires, but to tap these resources of motivation more fully we must embark on a journey to make school life more meaningful….We need to be in touch with our basic values and our connections to others. In other words, we must become more authentic with ourselves and others.” - Thomas J. Sergiovanni Moral Leadership
    36. 36. Continue the Conversation <ul><li>www.moralpurpose.blogspot.com </li></ul><ul><li>Claudia Heron </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Alison Kreider </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>510-830-9923 </li></ul>

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