From learning design to effective practices

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by Juliana Raffaghelli

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From learning design to effective practices

  1. 1. From Learning Design to effective practices. Developing Adults' educators professionalism in the context of ALICE project Juliana Raffaghelli International Center for Educational Research and Advanced Training (CISRE) Ca’ Foscari University of Venice International Conference Transforming the Educational Relationship: Intergenerational and Family Learning for Lifelong Learning BUCHAREST, 24-25 October 2013
  2. 2. Adults Education, a new frontier of practice    Adults education is a key for our societies. One of the less structured, illdefined in terms of practices and competences of the professional operating in the field (Beleid & Plato, 2008a) For the educator this means that she has to feature the own context of work in every intervention (Przybylska, 2008) Raising the overall level of skills of the adult population by offering more and better learning opportunities throughout adult life is important for both efficiency and equity reasons (…) . Not only does adult learning help make adults more efficient workers and, betterinformed and more active citizens. It also contributes to their personal well-being (EC COM 2006 [614final] p.5)
  3. 3. Adults’ education to promote creative intergenerational experiences    Intergenerational learning (IL) improves dialogue between generations through civic participation in common social and institutional spaces. A developing field of adults’ education (Hatton Yeo, 2012) Creating IL environments is still a challenge: a “crossingboundaries practice”   “Crossing Boundaries”: based on Activity Theory (Engestrom, 1987) Knowledge and expertisetransfer between contexts—such as school and work—through a process of “developmental transfer” and “expansive development” involving collaboration and the active reconstruction of knowledge between two or more activity systems (Tuomi-Gröhn, Engeström, & Young, 2003)
  4. 4. An example…
  5. 5. Two activity systems in dialogue
  6. 6. ALICE main assumptions Did you know?  Differences enrich  Creative Languages can become a bridge between generations Intergenerational learning (IL) is when adults and kids benefit from sharing activities and learn important Key competences. Adults as educators play an extremely important role in Society. Adults benefit from being educators. They create space for intergenerational dialogue
  7. 7. ALICE main assumptions Did you know?  Creative Languages Play, invent, share. They help to decrease the stress of dealing with «differences» through a joint activity  Intergenerational Learning, an opportunity For adults to reflect on the own role as educator. For children’s agency (expression and reinforcing of the self)
  8. 8. Two activity systems in dialogue
  9. 9. Learning Design & Design thinking: the kernel for adults’ educators professionalism   Design: from engeneering and architecture to education (Laurillard, 2012) Analysing the context, the available resources, the educational problem and the participant’s motivations, in order to orchestrate educational solutions based on the theory of learning (Goodyear & Dimitriadis, 2012) Learning Design, as conceptual and methodological approach for educators to explore their educational problems and make more grounded decisions to plan/implement their pedagogical practices (Conole, 2012)
  10. 10. Learning Design & Design thinking: the kernel for adults’ educators professionalism     Design: from engeneering and architecture to education (Laurillard, 2012) Analysing the context, the available resources, the educational problem and the participant’s motivations, in order to orchestrate educational solutions based on the theory of learning (Mor&Craft, 2012) Learning Design, as conceptual and methodological approach for educators to explore their educational problems and make more grounded decisions to plan/implement their pedagogical practices (Conole, 2012) Designing for Adults learning is one of the key competences for professionals operating in this area (Buiskol, Broek, van Lakerveld, Zarifis, & Osborne, 2010) It requires design thinking (Cross, 1982) as boundary crossing professional competence.
  11. 11. Design Thinking   At the level of the single educator: The more the educator improve their skills for design thinking, the more she will be able of planning and intervening in ill-structured problems, providing creative educational solutions At the level of the community of adults’ educators: the more the educators are able of designing for adults learning, the more they can adopt tools to represent, share and discuss the own practices, reinforcing a field of professional practices, which is also part of the adults’ educators professional identity.
  12. 12. ALICE case study      LLP-GRUNDTVIG project “Adults Learning for Intergenerational Creative Experiences”; Transnational and eLearning approach. 6 institutions from IT, RO, UK, EL, CH built a course and an educational environment (on moodle) provided the space to reflect about practices and share ideas, during 6 months of implementation. A professional learning community composed by 23 adults’ educators and a team of 6 adults’ education institutions attempting to shape new approaches (Adults Learning Pilot Programmes or ALPPs) to promote the idea of adults as educators as well as the value of creative languages to mediate intergenerational/family learning. www.alice-llp.eu www.alice-llp.eu/virtualspace
  13. 13. Research Methodology  Design Based Research (Brown, 1992; Pellerey 2005; Bielaczyc et al., 2004) Adapting ALPP Reflection /Evaluatio n Designing for IL Initial Idea The trainer Action
  14. 14. Promoting design thinking along an educational intervention as creative process: phases and elements Phase Understanding the context of practice Description Representing the educational process Objective: Plan the intervention beyond the procedures, reflecting on the pedagogy. Tools to represent/think about the design approach : The Four Leaves taxonomy and its 4 steps (information, laboratory, assessment/evaluation, personalization). Design thinking to provide solutions for...: a clear and concise representation as part of the process of Learning Design to allow discussion and peer-reviewing on the quality of approaches before putting them into practice. Implementing practices and networking to improve the educational sustainability Objective: A process of implementation that is continuously monitored from peers, participants and external stakeholders (institutions engaged in the practice Tools to represent/think about the design approach : Check-lists, mental maps, blog and private trainers’ log. Design thinking to provide solutions for...: abiliytelling a story that makes the whole approach accountable and shareable. Evaluating practices Objective: A participatory approach to understand learning achievements and the educational impact Tools to represent/think about the design approach : the learning/key competences map. Design thinking to provide solutions for...: understanding effectiveness as part of the educational process. Making the approach transparent: opening practices Objective: To understand the importance of Open Educational Resources in strenghtening the pedagogical and design thinking. Tools to represent/think about the design approach: templates and a virtual platform to shape/upload the own educational work. Design thinking to provide solutions for...: sharing educational practices in search for quality within the educational process. Objective: to collect information and reflect about the driving forces in the context of educational practice. Tools to represent/think about the design approach: Design Narratives and Force Map. Design thinking to provide solutions for...: The context as changing, fluid space of learning. The enlarged context of learning in the intergenerational case: adults’ goals of learning and children/teen goals of learning differ, but can dialogue in an enlarged context of learning. [1] http://www.ld-grid.org/resources/representations-and-languages/ http://www.slideshare.net/JulianaElisaRaffaghelli/alpp-strategylu6lu7 [3] http://www.slideshare.net/JulianaElisaRaffaghelli/alpp-strategylu6lu7 [4] http://www.slideshare.net/JulianaElisaRaffaghelli/alpp-strategylu6lu7 [2]
  15. 15. The creative process of educational intervention
  16. 16. ALICE’s Phases of Development Train adults' trainers • Understanding and implementing ALICE’s approach. Learning Design • Designing for adults intergenerational creative experiences. Different adults could be the target: partners, senior citizen, teachers, volunteers. Adults’ Learning Pilot Programmes • Testing phase where adults will use creative languages with children. Participatory evaluation with impact on intergenerational dialogue. Engaging Local institutions • Better understanding and practices on IL as part of adults education. The adult as educator
  17. 17. Connections between the phases as part of an approach to professional development
  18. 18. Analysis     Trainers’ Competences Map as counterpart of the adults Key Competences/Learning Map Trainers’ Log Social media as collectors of evidence on the ongoing practices The crystallized practice: an Open Educational Resource within the field of adults education
  19. 19. Analysis     Trainers’ Competences Map as counterpart of the adults Key Competences/Learning Map Trainers’ Log Social media as collectors of evidence on the ongoing practices The crystallized practice: Open Educational Resources produced.
  20. 20. Excerpt of Trainers’ Learning Map Initial Threasholds threashold Standard threashold Advanced threashold Expert Competenc Descriptors Descriptors Descriptors e Indicators Descriptors Learning Unit 6: Learning Design – Implementing Adults Creative Intergenerational Activities I am eager to I am able of I am able of I am able of Networkin creating some creating specific creating specific g for project participate in informal activities both with activities negotiating implementat local projects regarding adult educational other or by my them in local ion education activities in own. networks. I am open (Nr of collaboration also to work with respondents with other national European 22) expert trainers networks. (22%) (0%) (26%) (52%)
  21. 21. Initial Threasholds threashold Standard threashold Advanced threashold Expert Excerpt of Trainers’ Learning Map Competenc Descriptors Descriptors Descriptors e Indicators Descriptors Learning Unit 6: Learning Design – Implementing Adults Creative Intergenerational Activities I’m informed I can I can recognize Not only I can Evaluatin recognize the the importance of recognize the g Adults generally about the strategies of importance of the strategies of strategies of Learning participatory the strategies participatory participatory Pilot evaluation (like of evaluation (like the evaluation (like the Programmes the Key participatory Key Competence Key Competence (Nr of respondents 22) Competence Map). 10% evaluation (like the Key Competence Map). 16% Map); I’m also able of adopting some of these strategies. Everything is perfectly clear to me. 34% Map), as well as adopting some of these strategies; I’m also able of identifiying new strategies to keep improving my skills on participatory evaluation. 50%
  22. 22. A picture of first achievements (Source: Creative Language Nr of ALPPs Nr. Of Sessions Nr of Adults Nr. Of Children Nr. of institutions KC addressed Documents /Products collected ALPPs Learning Design – PW) Art/Cooking 4 14 80 126 6 Mainly 5 and 8, but also 6,7. 5 LD-ALPP 6 blog post (CISRE) 4 Presentations (CISRE) 3 newsletter articles (CISRE) Children Narrative 9 40 75 127 11 Mainly 8, but also 5,6. 3 blog posts 3 Newsletter articles Digital Storytelling 9 35 89 264 5 Mainly 4,5, but also 6,7. 2 blog post 1 video 1 newsletter article Games & Social Media 6 8 70 56 6 Mainly 5, but also 1, 8. 1 international presentation 1 Newsletter article Music 3 3 56 50 3 Mainly 5 and 8, but also 1,4,6. 1 blog post 1 newsletter article 1 video Total 33 86 290 497 31 National Participation Countries CH EL IT RO UK TOTAL Nr of ALPPs 5 6 6 14 2 33
  23. 23. Conclusions     The complexities of acquiring a cross boundary vision; frustrating experiences during the implementation The need of not only collecting evidence, but sharing it with adults as a mean to keep the focus on the value of the intervention A sense of ethical committement reinforcing the conversational and transformative framework (on the basis of Knowles, Mezirow, Freire) The overloading process of data collecting in DBR
  24. 24. An open research process… Thank you for your comments and suggestions!

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