Oh&S

2,272 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,272
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Oh&S

  1. 1. OH&S Legislation <ul><li>Occupational Health & Safety Act (2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Common Law – duty of care (places into a legal form a moral duty to anticipate possible causes of injury and illness and to do everything reasonably practicable to remove or minimise these possible causes of harm) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most significant change to the 2004 Act (previously 1985) – consultation – based on the concept that those who are exposed to the risk are often not those who make the decisions about OHS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes shared responsibilities for ensuring the health and safety of yourself & others </li></ul></ul>
  2. 2. OHS legislative & common law framework <ul><li>OHS Act – each state or territory has its own Act governing how occupational health and safety is to be addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Regulations – each state or territory has a range of OHS regulations that provide more specific rules that MUST be followed for a range of OHS issues or hazards </li></ul><ul><li>Codes of Practice – developed in all states and territories and provide information on how to comply with the rules set out in Regulations – codes of practice are not rules, but should be followed </li></ul><ul><li>Australian Standards and recognised industry standards – have less authority than codes of practice - guidance tools, benchmarks, recommended minimum industry standards </li></ul><ul><li>Guidance material – produced by a range of government and other bodies including the National Occupational Health & Safety Commission (NOHSC) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Hazards <ul><li>A hazard is defined as anything in the workplace that has the potential to cause harm, and which can </li></ul><ul><ul><li>affect people – injury, illness, death, psychological trauma; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cause property-damage, contamination, theft and wastage; or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>affect processes – work disruption and interruption to production </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Hazards <ul><li>Physical (e.g. obstacles, heat, poor lighting) </li></ul><ul><li>Manual handling </li></ul><ul><li>Occupational overuse syndrome (RSI) </li></ul><ul><li>Noise </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical (e.g. cleaning agents) </li></ul><ul><li>Biological (e.g. bacteria) </li></ul><ul><li>Psychological (e.g. shiftwork) </li></ul><ul><li>Poor design (e.g. slippery floors, cramped space) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Some industry hazards <ul><li>Exposure to irritants (chemical) </li></ul><ul><li>Cut wounds </li></ul><ul><li>Slips, trips and falls </li></ul><ul><li>Faulty or poorly maintained electrical equipment and machinery </li></ul><ul><li>Poor lifting or manual handling techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Occupational overuse syndrome (RSI) </li></ul><ul><li>Exposure to blood-borne viruses (piercing - Biological) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Know your safety responsibilities <ul><li>Safety programs include three key parts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assessing risks – analysing any safety hazards in the work environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing risks – taking steps to reduce or control the risks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Being prepared – knowing what to do if something goes wrong </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Salon OH&S guidelines include <ul><li>Safety Policies </li></ul><ul><li>Safety Procedures – (e.g. safe operating procedures for the use of equipment) </li></ul><ul><li>Guidance material – (e.g. material safety data sheets) </li></ul><ul><li>Safety audit checklists </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency procedures </li></ul>

×