Spota Spot Training

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This is a presentation for training volunteers who are part of the National Melanoma Awareness Project's Spot a Spot program.

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  • Spota Spot Training

    1. 1. Melanoma Awareness Project: Video Training www.spotaspot.org Spot a Spot. Save a Life.
    2. 2. Melanoma Awareness Project © 2005 Joel Myres Melanoma Awareness Project Funded by the John Wayne Cancer Foundation Supported by the Children’s Hospital of Orange County & UCI School of Medicine www.spotaspot.org Spot a Spot. Save a Life.
    3. 3. Today you will learn: <ul><li>1. Sun Exposure = Sunburns, Wrinkles & CANCERS! </li></ul><ul><li>2. Melanoma is most dangerous kind of skin cancer. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Notice a Mole? ABCD’s! </li></ul><ul><li>It’s simple: </li></ul><ul><li>Spot a spot. Save a Life. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Did You Know? <ul><li>The skin is the largest organ of the body. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Common Cancer = ¡Skin Cancer! </li></ul><ul><li> 1.3 Million Cases in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>1/3 of people living in </li></ul><ul><li>southern California </li></ul><ul><li>will develop skin cancer </li></ul><ul><li>in their lifetime… </li></ul>
    5. 5. Why should YOU care? <ul><li>1 Person in the U.S. dies from Melanoma every hour. 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Most common cancer in women ages 20-29, and the #1 cause of cancer deaths in women ages 25-30. 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Rising fastest in men in Southern California. 3 </li></ul>By 2010, about 1 in 50 people in the U.S. will get melanoma! 4
    6. 23. Melanoma affects all of us… <ul><li>Darker skin individuals are less likely </li></ul><ul><li>≈ </li></ul><ul><li>Potentially late detection </li></ul>Melanoma is one of the top causes of life years lost to preventable cancer.
    7. 24. <ul><li>Of all states, California will have the greatest number of new Melanoma cases in 2005- approximately 5,440. 5 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>#1. LA County </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>#2. Orange County </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>#3. San Diego County 3 </li></ul></ul>… Beautiful California You’re Biggest Risk Factor: Living in Sunny California
    8. 25. Melanoma kills people like you and me every day… but it doesn’t have to! <ul><li>Melanoma is 95-100% curable if caught early and treated quickly. </li></ul><ul><li>19/20 melanoma deaths might have been prevented by education alone. </li></ul><ul><li>Spot a Spot </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Save a Life!!! </li></ul>
    9. 47. What Does Early Detection Mean? 60
    10. 48. <ul><li>UVA & UVB Rays </li></ul>UV Rays
    11. 49. This is your skin…
    12. 50. Sunburn = Serious Sun Damage <ul><li>1 blistering sunburn under the age of 20  risk of melanoma. </li></ul><ul><li>>3 blistering sunburns  your risk 5x </li></ul><ul><li>Strong Rays = 10 am to 4 pm </li></ul>
    13. 51. The Shadow Rule <ul><li>The sun’s rays are less </li></ul><ul><li>intense at times when your shadow is longer than you are. </li></ul>
    14. 52. Sun Damage  Wrinkles <ul><li>We get approximately 80% of our lifetime sun exposure before we are 18 years old. </li></ul>Sun Protection Too Much Sun!!!
    15. 54. While wrinkles can occur naturally with age, they can appear earlier and be more severe because of sun exposure we get when we’re young. INTSERT PICTURES OF CELEBRITIES!!!!!! ©copyright Nick Vedros
    16. 55. Sun Damage  Skin Cancer
    17. 56. Basal Cell Carcinoma <ul><li>Most common type of skin cancer: about 1 million cases each year in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Slow-growing, rarely fatal, but can be disfiguring </li></ul><ul><li>Caused by a large amount of total accumulated lifetime sun exposure </li></ul>Photographs courtesy of Gary Cole, MD
    18. 57. Squamous Cell Carcinoma <ul><li>Second most common type of skin cancer </li></ul><ul><li>If treated early, 100% curable </li></ul><ul><li>If untreated, can spread through body and can kill </li></ul><ul><li>Caused by large amount of total accumulated lifetime sun exposure </li></ul>Photograph courtesy of Gary Cole, MD
    19. 58. It’s easy to SPOT A SPOT: The ABCD’s of Melanoma A SSYMETRY: -If you were to fold it in half, the two sides wouldn’t match up. B ORDER IRREGULARITY : -Jagged or blurred edges rather than smooth, continuous line. C OLOR VARIATION or C HANGE: -Two or more different colors are present. -A mole has been changing in any way. D IAMETER: -Any sudden or continuing growth -Any mole larger than 6mm (pencil-top eraser) (Images and text borrowed with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology 6 )
    20. 59. Melanoma If you notice a mole on your body that has changed or has any of the ABCD features, go to a dermatologist (skin doctor) right away to have it checked. DON’T WAIT!!! Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD
    21. 60. Melanoma If you notice a mole on your body that has changed or has any of the ABCD features, go to a dermatologist (skin doctor) right away to have it checked. DON’T WAIT!!! Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD
    22. 61. Melanoma If you notice a mole on your body that has changed or has any of the ABCD features, go to a dermatologist (skin doctor) right away to have it checked. DON’T WAIT!!! Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD
    23. 62. Melanoma If you notice a mole on your body that has changed or has any of the ABCD features, go to a dermatologist (skin doctor) right away to have it checked. DON’T WAIT!!! Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD
    24. 63. Warning!!!
    25. 64. Melanoma If you notice a mole on your body that has changed or has any of the ABCD features, go to a dermatologist (skin doctor) right away to have it checked. DON’T WAIT!!! Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD
    26. 65. It’s easier to SPOT A SPOT if you look for it! (Images and text borrowed with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology 6 )
    27. 66. It’s easier to SPOT A SPOT if you look for it! (Images and text borrowed with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology 6 )
    28. 67. Let’s Review Risk Factors for Skin Cancer <ul><li>Living in California </li></ul><ul><li>Having fair skin , eyes, or hair, or skin that sunburns easily (although anyone can get melanoma) </li></ul><ul><li>1 or more blistering sunburn in life </li></ul><ul><li>Having had a lot of sun exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Having >50 moles on your body </li></ul><ul><li>Having a family member who has had skin cancer </li></ul>
    29. 68. <ul><li>Apply SUNSCREEN 30 minutes before going outdoors. </li></ul><ul><li>Reapply several times a day – every 2 to 3 hours. </li></ul><ul><li>Reapply after swimming, playing or exercising outdoors. </li></ul><ul><li>Apply on sunny AND cloudy days . </li></ul>PROTECT YOURSELF: Use Sunscreen!!! (Note: We are not endorsing any particular brands, just showing some examples of variety available.)
    30. 69. … It’s never too early to learn sun safety habits! <ul><li>Sunscreen , SPF > 15, applied several times daily, every day </li></ul><ul><li>Sunglasses that protect against UVA and UVB rays </li></ul><ul><li>Hats, shirts , and other protective clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Seek shade when possible, and remember the Shadow Rule </li></ul><ul><li>Regular self- skin checks : You can’t spot a spot if you don’t look </li></ul>
    31. 70. February 6, 1945 – May 11, 1981 Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD
    32. 71. Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD Today’s Melanoma Survivors:
    33. 72. Joel’s Story <ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> When Joel was just 16, his mother </li></ul><ul><li> noticed a mole on his neck that had </li></ul><ul><li> changed. It was melanoma. It was </li></ul><ul><li> removed without too much trouble and </li></ul><ul><li> Joel went on with his life. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>Just after he’d finished his second </li></ul><ul><li>year of medical school, Joel noticed a lump </li></ul><ul><li>in his abdomen. It was melanoma that had </li></ul><ul><li>spread through his body. </li></ul>
    34. 73. Joel’s Story <ul><li>On March 7, 2001, at age 31, Joel passed away from melanoma, less than one year after being diagnosed with metastatic melanoma. </li></ul><ul><li>Joel’s memory will continue to live on, not only in the hearts of all those touched by him, but also through this project, as his memory teaches young teens the importance of melanoma prevention and early detection. </li></ul>
    35. 74. Remember!!! <ul><li>1. Sun Exposure = Sunburns, Wrinkles & CANCERS! </li></ul><ul><li>2. Melanoma is most dangerous kind of skin cancer. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Notice a Mole? ABCD’s! </li></ul><ul><li>It’s simple: </li></ul><ul><li>Spot a spot. Save a Life. </li></ul>
    36. 75. Breast Cancer
    37. 76. The Numbers <ul><li>Estimated new cases and deaths from breast cancer in the United States in 2007: </li></ul><ul><li>New cases: 178,480 (female) ; 2,030 (male) </li></ul><ul><li>Deaths: 40,460 (female) ; 450 (male) </li></ul><ul><li>Breast cancer in adolescents and young adults is rare. However , it does occur so be cautious of your body. </li></ul>
    38. 77. Understanding the Cancer
    39. 78. <ul><li>1. Breast Self- Exam </li></ul><ul><li>2. Clinical Breast Exam </li></ul><ul><li>3. Screening Mammogram </li></ul>Knowing Your Body: Screening
    40. 79. Self Breast Exam
    41. 80. Testicular Cancer
    42. 81. The Numbers <ul><li>Estimated new cases and deaths from testicular cancer in the United States in 2007: New cases : 7,920 Deaths : 380 </li></ul><ul><li>11% of all cancers occurring in all individuals in the 15- to 29-year age group. </li></ul><ul><li>In the year 2000, 2,500 individuals 15 to 29 years old were diagnosed with testicular cancer in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>The incidence of testicular cancer peaked in the age ranges 25 to 29 and 30 to 34, and then declined thereafter. </li></ul><ul><li>The 5-year survival rate in all age groups was in excess of 90%. </li></ul>
    43. 82. Knowing Your Body
    44. 83. Group Activities
    45. 84. At this point, one or both of the following group activities may be used to encourage interaction and reinforce learning. <ul><ul><li>Group Activity #1: Fun in the Sun: What’s hot and what’s not? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>-(slides 22-25) When shown the images, students are to brainstorm what risk factors are present, what the people are doing right to protect themselves, and what they should be doing differently. A team format may be used to encourage competition and participation, where the side of the room with the quickest and most correct responses “wins.” This activity reinforces sun safety habits. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Group Activity #2: Spot a Spot: Safe or not? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>-(slides 26-29) When shown each set of 2 images, students are to decide which image is a possible melanoma and which is a normal (“safe”) mole. Then they are to explain how they decided that, using the ABCDs of melanoma. A team format may be used to encourage competition and participation, where the side of the room with the quickest and most correct responses “wins.” This activity reinforces self screening/early detection. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>All students should be shown slide #30 and encouraged to participate in the Poster Contest. This will give them a sense of ownership of the melanoma message, and will encourage them to spread the word! </li></ul>
    46. 85. Day at the Beach
    47. 86. Day in the Snow
    48. 87. Outdoor Sports
    49. 88. Tanning
    50. 89. A B C D Photograph courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD SPOT the SPOT: MELANOMA vs. MOLE?
    51. 90. A B Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD SPOT the SPOT: MELANOMA vs. MOLE?
    52. 91. A B C D Photographs courtesy of Kenneth Linden, MD, PhD SPOT the SPOT: MELANOMA vs. MOLE?
    53. 92. M.A.P. POSTER CONTEST!!! <ul><li>Fight skin cancer and save lives! </li></ul><ul><li>Design a poster promoting: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Safer sun enjoyment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Skin-cancer self screening </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The ABCDs of melanoma/ how to SPOT A SPOT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Any other idea to teach others about skin cancer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PRIZES!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Submitted posters may be eligible for </li></ul><ul><li>display and/or publication in books or </li></ul><ul><li>magazines to raise melanoma awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Get details from your teacher or from </li></ul><ul><li>www.spotaspot.org </li></ul>
    54. 93. … Now it’s your turn <ul><li>Please share what you’ve learned with family/ friends! </li></ul><ul><li>For more information about the </li></ul><ul><li>Melanoma Awareness Project, visit </li></ul><ul><li>www. spotaspot.org </li></ul>
    55. 94. References <ul><li>1) Melanoma Education Foundation; www.skincheck.org </li></ul><ul><li>2) Lotze MT, Dallal RM, Kirkwood JM, Flickinger JC. Cutaneous melanoma. In DeVita VT, Rosenberg SA, Hellman S. (eds.), Principles and Practice of Oncology , 6th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 2001. </li></ul><ul><li>3) National Cancer Institute, State Cancer Profiles. www.statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov </li></ul><ul><li>4) Rigel D, Friedman R, Dzubow L, Reintgen D, Marks R, Bystryn JC (eds.). Cancer of the Skin. New York: WB Sunders Co, 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>5) American Cancer Society, Statistics. www.cancer.org/statistics </li></ul><ul><li>6) American Academy of Dermatology, (bookmarks.) www.aad.org </li></ul><ul><li>Many thanks to Barbara and Jerry Myres, and to Natalie, </li></ul><ul><li>for sharing Joel’s memory with us. </li></ul>2005-6 Melanoma Awareness Project Curriculum. Copyright 2005 Joel Myres Melanoma Awareness Project. Waller JM, Rietkerk W, Phillips J, Lam K, McCullough J, Osann K, Linden K.

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