Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Preliminary electrical load calculation course share

30,036 views

Published on

how to estimate and plan electrical load for any space, area, building, group of buildings

Published in: Design
  • You can ask here for a help. They helped me a lot an i`m highly satisfied with quality of work done. I can promise you 100% un-plagiarized text and good experts there. Use with pleasure! ⇒ www.WritePaper.info ⇐
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Government auctions are cool. We got a great deal on a quality car that we wanted. Awesome! ▶▶▶ https://w.url.cn/s/AFqTUhi
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • With our first class race consulting service, our members bring in more than £13,000 each month from betting and at least £160,000 per year! More info... =>> https://url.cn/05AQZAqy
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I'd advise you to use this service: ⇒ www.HelpWriting.net ⇐ The price of your order will depend on the deadline and type of paper (e.g. bachelor, undergraduate etc). The more time you have before the deadline - the less price of the order you will have. Thus, this service offers high-quality essays at the optimal price.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Great projects with clear instructions. I've gotten an enormous feeling of accomplishment pride from making my own bookshelves and side tables. Thanks Ted! 》》》 https://url.cn/ktFCrsHZ
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Preliminary electrical load calculation course share

  1. 1.      2013  Electrical Load Estimation Course Ali Hassan  Certified Energy Manager – AEE ‐ USA     
  2. 2. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  About Author   Hi, Im Ali Hassan el‐Ashmawy, I began my career from 1999  as a site electrical engineer then as area manager from 2001  then as electrical designer from 2003 then as senior  electrical designer from 2006 and up to date.  In my past experience, I designed and construct about 100 projects in different countries like Egypt, Kuwait, Indonesia, KSA, Gabon and Iraq. My designs were approved by many international authorities like USA corps of engineers and USA ministry of exterior – OBO Office. Im certified energy manger CEM from AEE – USA since 2006 and I hope to become a well‐known designer in the field of electrical design.  To contact me please email to Ali1973hassan@yahoo.com     Page 2 of 41   
  3. 3. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  Course Description: This course is intended to prepare the target persons with the ability to recognize, understand, and perform preliminary electrical load calculation/estimation for any building type by many calculation methods.  The target Persons: Design engineers, new graduate engineers, under graduate engineering students.  Skills Development: On completion of this course the target person will be able to:   • Recognize different calculation method for electrical load estimation.  • Understand the procedures and logic of each method for electrical load  estimation.  • Perform the calculations steps of each method for electrical load estimation. Page 3 of 41   
  4. 4. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  Table of Contents   Page  S/N  Item  No.  1  Introduction  5  2  Importance of Electrical Load Estimation (Preliminary Load  5  Calculations)  3  Definition of Important terms in Load Estimation  5  3.1  Connected load  5  3.2  Demand load   5  3.3  Demand Interval  6  3.4  Maximum demand  6  3.5  Demand factor (in IEC, Factor of maximum utilization ku)  6  3.6  Coincidence factor (in IEC, Factor of simultaneity ks)  7  3.7  Diversity factor  10  3.7.1  Difference between demand and diversity factor  11  3.8  Load factor  18  4  Methods of Electrical load estimation  19  5  Preliminary Electrical Load estimate   19  5.1  Difference between preliminary and final load estimate  19  5.2  Preliminary load calculations sub‐methods  20  5.3  Space‐by‐Space Method (functional area method)  21  5.3.1  Usage conditions of Space‐by‐Space Method   21  5.3.2  Area Measurement in space by space method   21  5.3.3  Method of estimation by using Space‐by‐Space Method   21    First Case  21    Second case  25  5.4  The Building Method 29  5.4.1  Comparison between space‐by‐space and building methods  29  5.4.2  Usage conditions of Building Method 29  5.4.3  Area Measurement in Building Method  29  5.4.4  Method of estimation by using Building Method 29    First Case  30    Second case  31  5.5  Area method  35  5.5.1  Usage conditions of Area Method  35  5.5.2  Method of estimation by using Area Method   36    First: basic method  36    Second: Optional Method (Load centers method)  38  5.6  General notes for all methods of electrical load estimations  41     Page 4 of 41   
  5. 5. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com 1‐ Introduction  At the beginning of the project, in the draft design (early design) stage, the electrical design professional should do the following:     • Make Analysis of load characteristics,   • Review The available voltage system types/classes and levels,  • Review the utility’s rate structure,   • Make roughly a key single‐line diagram and a set of subsidiary single‐line  diagrams. The key single‐line diagram should show the sources of power e.g.  generators, utility intakes, the main switchboard and the interconnections to  the subsidiary or secondary switchboards.   • Develop Demand factor relationship between connected loads and the actual  demand imposed on the system.    2‐ Importance of Electrical Load Estimation (Preliminary Load Calculations)  Electrical Load Estimation is very important in the draft design (early design) stage because it help to:   • Plan the connection to upstream network and MV circuit configurations.   • Plan the transformers substation(s) (if any) and the main switchgear room.   • Apply to Power Company for supply.   • Calculate initial budget for the electrical works.     3‐ Definition of Important terms in Load Estimation:  There are many important terms which must be understood before performing the load estimation, these terms are:   3.1 Connected load  It is the Sum of all the loads connected to the electrical system, usually expressed in watts.    3.2 Demand load   It is the electric load at the receiving terminals averaged over a specified demand  Page 5 of 41   
  6. 6. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com interval of time, usually 15 min., 30 min., or 1 hour based upon the particular utility’s demand interval. Demand may be expressed in amperes, kilo‐amperes, kilo‐watts, kilo‐vars, or kilo‐volt‐amperes.    3.3 Demand Interval  It is the period over which the load is averaged, usually 15 min., 30 min., or 1 hour.     3.4 Maximum demand  It is the greatest of all demands that have occurred during a specified period of time such as 5 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes or one hour. For utility billing purposes the period of time is generally one month.    3.5 Demand factor (in IEC, Factor of maximum utilization ku)   In normal operating conditions the power consumption of a load is sometimes less than that indicated as its nominal power rating.   The demand factor is the ratio of the maximum demand on a system to the total connected load of the system.    Demand factor = Maximum demand load / Total load connected    Notes:   • This factor must be applied to each individual load, with particular attention  to electric motors, which are very rarely operated at full load.   • Demand factors for buildings typically range between 50 and 80 percent of  the connected load. For most building types, the demand factor at the service  where the maximum diversity is experienced is usually 60 to 75 percent of  the connected load. Specific portions of the system may have much higher  demand factors, even approaching 100 percent.          Page 6 of 41   
  7. 7. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com 3.6 Coincidence factor (in IEC, Factor of simultaneity ks)  It is a matter of common experience that the simultaneous operation of all installed loads of a given installation never occurs in practice, i.e. there is always some degree of diversity and this fact is taken into account for estimating purposes by the use of a simultaneity factor (ks).   The coincidence factor is the ratio of the maximum demand of a system, or part under consideration, to the sum of the individual maximum demands of the subdivisions.    Coincidence factor = Maximum system demand / Sum of individual maximum demands    Notes:   • The factor ks is applied to each group of loads (e.g. being supplied from a  distribution or sub‐distribution board).    Example#1 (see Fig.1):   5 storeys apartment building with 25 consumers, each having 6 kVA of installed load.   Calculate the following:   1. The total installed load,  2. The apparent‐power supply,  3. The main service size,  4. The third level service size.    Solution:   1‐ Calculation of The total installed load,  From Fig.1, The total installed load for the building will be the sum of the installed loads in the (5) storeys which will be as follows:  Ground floor:  Page 7 of 41   
  8. 8. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com There are (4) consumers, the installed loads in this storey = 4consumers x 6 KVA installed load per consumer = 24 KVA  First Floor: There are (6) consumers, the installed loads in this storey = 6 x 6 = 36 KVA  Second Floor: There are (5) consumers, the installed loads in this storey = 5 x 6 = 30 KVA  Third Floor: There are (4) consumers, the installed loads in this storey = 4 x 6 = 24 KVA  Forth Floor: There are (6) consumers, the installed loads in this storey = 6 x 6 = 36 KVA  So, the total installed load for the building = 24 + 36 + 30 + 24 + 36 = 150 kVA      Fig (1)  Page 8 of 41   
  9. 9. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com    Table#1: Factor of simultaneity (ks) for Apartments Block  From Table#1 in above, it is possible to determine the magnitude of currents in different sections of the common main feeder supplying all floors.  For vertical rising mains fed at ground level, the cross‐sectional area of the conductors can evidently be progressively reduced from the lower floors towards the upper floors. These changes of conductor size are conventionally spaced by at least 3‐floor intervals.   2‐ Calculation of apparent power  From Table#1, since the number of downstream consumers = 25, the Factor of simultaneity ks = 0.46 So, the apparent‐power supply required for the building = 150 KVA x 0.46 = 69 kVA   3‐ Calculation of The main service size  The current entering the rising main at ground level (main service size) = (150 x 0.46 x 1000) / (400 x √3) = 100 A   4‐ Calculation of The third level service size  The current entering the third floor (the third level service size) = sum of currents delivered to third and fourth floors  The number of consumers in the third and fourth floors = 4 + 6 =10 consumers  From Table#1, for number of downstream consumers = 10, the Factor of simultaneity ks = 0.63  Page 9 of 41   
  10. 10. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  So, the current entering the third floor (the third level service size) = (36 + 24) x 0.63 x 1000 / (400 x √3) = 55 A    3.7 Diversity factor  the diversity factor is the reciprocal of the coincidence factor.   Diversity factor = Sum of individual maximum demands / Maximum system demand    Notes:   • The Diversity Factor is applied to each group of loads (e.g. being supplied  from a distribution or sub‐distribution board).    Example#2:   Consider that a feeder supplies five users with the following load conditions:   • On Monday, user one reaches a maximum demand of 100 amps;  • On Tuesday, two reaches 95 amps;  • On Wednesday, three reaches 85 amps;  • On Thursday, four reaches 75 amps;  • On Friday, five reaches 65 amps.  • The feeder’s maximum demand is 250 amps.   Calculate the Diversity Factor for this feeder?   Solution:  The diversity factor can be determined as follows:   Sum of total demands = 100 + 95 + 85 + 75 + 65 = 420 A  Diversity factor = Sum of total demands ÷ Maximum demand on feeder = 420 A ÷ 250 A = 1.68         Page 10 of 41   
  11. 11. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com Example#3:   Calculate the size of a main feeder from substation switchgear that is supplying five feeders with connected loads of 400, 350, 300, 250 and 200 kilovolt‐amperes (kVA) with demand factors of 95, 90, 85, 80 and 75 percent respectively. Use a diversity factor of 1.5.    Solution:  1‐ Calculate demand for each feeder:   Feeder#1 demand = 400 kVA × 95% = 380 kVA  Feeder#2 demand = 350 kVA × 90% = 315 kVA  Feeder#3 demand = 300 kVA × 85% = 255 kVA  Feeder#4 demand = 250 kVA × 80% = 200 kVA  Feeder#5 demand = 200 kVA × 75% = 150 kVA   2‐ Sum all of the individual demands = 380 + 315 + 255 + 200 + 150 = 1,300 kVA   3‐ If the feeder were sized at unity diversity, then the size of the main feeder = 1,300 kVA ÷ 1.00 = 1,300 kVA   However, using the diversity factor of 1.5, the size of the main feeder = 1,300 kVA ÷ 1.5 = 866 kVA.    3.7.1 Difference between demand and diversity factor:  Most of the electrical engineers confuse between the demand and diversity factors, to solve this confusion, dont forget that:     • The Demand factor must be applied to each individual load, with particular  attention to electric motors, which are very rarely operated at full load.   • The Diversity Factor is applied to each group of loads (e.g. being supplied  from a distribution or sub‐distribution board).     Example #4:   An industrial building consists of (3) nos. workshops A, B & C, each workshop will include the following loads:   Page 11 of 41   
  12. 12. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com Workshop A:  • 4 nos. lathe with 5 KVA each,   • 2 nos. pedestal drill with 2 KVA each,   • 5 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A on one circuit with 18 KVA total,   • 30 nos. fluorescent lamps on one circuit with 3 KVA total.   Workshop B:   • One nos. Compressor with 15 KVA,   • 3 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A on one circuit with 10.6 KVA total,   • 10 nos. fluorescent lamps on one circuit with 1 KVA total.    Workshop C:   • 2 nos. ventilation fans with 2.5 KVA each,   • 2 nos. Oven with 15 KVA each,   • 5 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A on one circuit with 18 KVA total,   • 20 nos. fluorescent lamps on one circuit with 2 KVA total.     • Draw a key single line diagram for this building?   • Determine both the demand (utilization) factor and simultaneity factor with  the help of tables # 2 & 3 in below?   • Calculate the demand load for each level in the key single line diagram?        Table#2: Factor of simultaneity for distribution boards (IEC 60439)  Page 12 of 41   
  13. 13. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  table#3: Factor of simultaneity according to circuit function   solution:     Follow the solution steps in below and in fig.2.   fig.2  Page 13 of 41   
  14. 14. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  Step#1: List all the loads in each workshop and write the apparent power of each load in KVA beside it.  Step#2: write the utilization factor for each load, IEC gives Ku estimation values for these loads as follows:   • For motor Ku = 0.8   • For socket outlets Ku = 1 (depend on the type of appliances being supplied  from the sockets concerned)   • For light circuits Ku= 1   The Table of Calculation for Steps# 1&2 will be as follows:   Apparent  Apparent  Utilization  Workshop  Power  Load Type  Load No.  Power  Factor  Name  Demand  (KVA)  Max.  Max.KVA  lathe  No.1  5  0.8  4  No.2  5  0.8  4  No.3  5  0.8  4  Workshop  No.4  5  0.8  4  A:  pedestal drill  No.1  2  0.8  1.6  No.2  2  0.8  1.6  5 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A  18  1  18  30 nos. fluorescent lamps  3  1  3  Compressor  15  0.8  12  3 nos. sockets  Workshop  outlets 10/16 A    10.6 1  10.6  B:  10 nos. fluorescent  lamps    1 1  1  ventilation fan  No.1  2.5 1  2.5  No.2  2.5 1  2.5  Workshop  Oven  No.1  15 1  15  C:  No.2  15 1  15  5 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A  18 1  18  20 nos. fluorescent lamps  2 1  2  Step#3: calculate the Max. Demand apparent power in KVA for each load = apparent power X Ku for each load.    Step# 4: group same type of loads on one distribution panel/box and this will be the first Level of distribution (LEVEL 1).   Page 14 of 41   
  15. 15. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  Step# 5: in level 1 and from table #2, write the simultaneity factor for each distribution panel/box and from table # 3 write the simultaneity factor for each for each separate load.   Step# 6: calculate the Max. Demand apparent power in KVA for each distribution panel/box = sum of all branch loads’ Max. Demand apparent power in KVA X simultaneity factor for each distribution panel/box.  The Table of Calculation will be as follows:   Level‐1  Appar ent  Appar Appar Utilizat Power  ent Worksho Load  ent  ion  Load Type  Dema simultan Power p Name  No.  Power  Factor  nd  eity  Dema (KVA)  Max.  Max.K factor  nd  VA  Max.K VA  lathe  No.1  5  0.8  4  No.2  5  0.8  4  No.3  5  0.8  4  0.75  14.4 Worksho No.4  5  0.8  4  p A:  pedestal drill  No.1  2  0.8  1.6  No.2  2  0.8  1.6  5 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A  18  1  18  0.2  3.6  30 nos. fluorescent lamps  3  1  3  1  3  Compressor  15  0.8  12  1  12  3 nos. sockets Worksho outlets 10/16 A    10.6 1  10.6  0.4  4.3  p B:  10 nos. fluorescent  lamps    1 1  1  1  1  ventilation fan  No.1  2.5 1  2.5  No.2  2.5 1  2.5  1  35 Worksho Oven  No.1  15 1  15  p C:  No.2  15 1  15  5 nos. sockets outlets 10/16 A  18 1  18  0.28  5  20 nos. fluorescent lamps  2 1  2  1  2  Step# 7: group the distribution panel/box in each workshop in one main distribution panel/box. So, we will have (3) main distribution panel/box for the (3) workshops and this will be the second level of distribution (LEVEL 2).     Page 15 of 41   
  16. 16. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com Step# 8: in level 2 and from table #2, write the simultaneity factor for each main distribution panel/box.   Step# 9: calculate the Max. Demand apparent power in KVA for each main distribution panel/box = sum of all branch distribution boxes’ Max. Demand apparent power in KVA X simultaneity factor for each main distribution panel/box.   The Table of Calculation will be as follows: Worksh Load Type  Load  App Utiliz App Level‐1  Level‐2  op  No.  aren ation  arenName  t  Facto t  simult App simult App Pow r  Pow er  Max.  er  aneity  aren aneity  aren factor  t  factor   t  (KVA Dem Pow Pow )  and  er  er  Max. Dem Dem KVA  and  and  Max. Max. KVA  KVA Works lathe  No.1 5  0.8  4  0.75  14.4  0.9  18.9 hop A:     No.2 5  0.8  4     No.3 5  0.8  4     No.4 5  0.8  4  pedestal drill  No.1 2  0.8  1.6     No.2 2 0.8 1.6  5 nos. sockets outlets  18  1  18  0.2  3.6  10/16 A  30 nos. fluorescent  3  1  3  1  3  lamps Works Compressor     15  0.8  12  1  12  0.9  15.6 hop B:    3 nos. sockets     10.6 1  10.6  0.4  4.3  outlets 10/16 A  10 nos.     1 1  1  1  1  fluorescent  lamps Works ventilation fan  No.1 2.5 1  2.5  1  35  0.9  37.8 hop C:      No.2 2.5 1 2.5 Oven  No.1 15 1  15     No.2 15 1 15 5 nos. sockets outlets  18 1  18  0.28  5  10/16 A  20 nos. fluorescent  2 1 2 1 2 lamps    Page 16 of 41   
  17. 17. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com  Step# 10: group the (3) main distribution panel/box in one main general distribution board MGDB and this will be the third level of distribution (LEVEL 3).   Step# 11: in level 3 and from table #2, write the main general distribution board MGDB.   Step# 12: calculate the Max. Demand apparent power in KVA for main general distribution board MGDB = sum of the (3) workshop main distribution boxes’ Max. Demand apparent power in KVA X simultaneity factor for main general distribution board MGDB.  The Table of Calculation will be as follows:     Load Type  Load  App Utiliz App Level‐1 Level‐2  Level‐3 Workshop  No.  aren ation  aren Name  t  Facto t  Pow r  Pow simult App simult App simult App er  Max.  er  aneity  aren aneity  aren aneity  aren (KVA Dem factor   t  factor   t  factor   t  )  and  Pow Pow Pow Max. er  er  er  KVA  Dem Dem Dem and  and  and  Max. Max. Max. KVA  KVA  KVA Works lathe  No. 5  0.8  4  0.75  14. 0.9  18. 0.9  65 hop A:  1  4  9     No. 5  0.8  4  2     No. 5 0.8 4 3     No. 5  0.8  4  4  pedestal drill  No. 2 0.8 1.6 1     No. 2  0.8  1.6  2   5 nos. sockets outlets  18 1 18 0.2 3.6 10/16 A  30 nos. fluorescent  3  1  3  1  3  lamps            Works Compressor     15  0.8  12  1  12  0.9  15.hop B:    3 nos. sockets     10. 1  10. 0.4  4.3  6  outlets 10/16 A  6 6  10 nos.     1 1  1  1  1  fluorescent  lamps            Works ventilation fan  No. 2.5 1  2.5  1  35  0.9  37. Page 17 of 41   
  18. 18. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com hop C:   1  8     No. 2.5 1 2.5 2  Oven  No. 15 1  15  1     No. 15 1 15 2  5 nos. sockets outlets  18 1  18  0.28  5  10/16 A  20 nos. fluorescent  2 1 2 1 2 lamps    3.8 Load factor   The load factor is the ratio of the average load over a designated period of time, usually 1 year, to the maximum load occurring in that period.   Load factor = Average load / Maximum load    Free download  You can download tables for different factors listed above by clicking the following links:   • IEEE Demand Factor Values   • Unified Facilities Criteria ‐UFC‐ Demand Factor Values   • NEC Demand Factor Values   • Demand Factor Values From Other Regulations   • Diversity Factor Values   • Unified Facilities Criteria ‐UFC‐Load Factor Values   • IEC Factor of Simultaneity Values          Page 18 of 41   
  19. 19. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com 4‐ Methods of Electrical load estimation   There are (5) methods for Electrical Load Estimation, which are:   A‐ Preliminary load calculation  This method is subdivided into (3) sub‐methods as follows:    1. Space by space (functional area method),   2. Building method.   3. Area method.   B‐ NEC load calculations.  C‐ Final load calculations.     Note:   In this course, I will explain the preliminary load estimation methods, and the two other methods; NEC load calculations and Final load calculations will be explained later in course " EE‐3: Basic Electrical design course – Level II ”, because the preliminary load estimation methods are used in the early design phase while the other two methods are applied in the final stages of design.     5‐ Preliminary Electrical Load estimate   5.1 Difference between preliminary and final load estimate  before going through the calculation steps for Preliminary Electrical Loads, we need to highlight the main differences between the load estimation or calculation by the preliminary and final methods. The following table shows these differences as follows: S/N  Preliminary load calculations  Final load calculations 1  Units of Loads will be in (W/ft2)  Units of Loads will be in KW (kilo‐watt),  watts per square foot or/and  or/and KVA (kilo‐volt‐ampere), or/and HP  (VA/ft2) volt‐amperes per square  (horse power)  foot    Page 19 of 41   
  20. 20. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com 2  units are used interchangeably  Units can’t used interchangeably. So, Hp  because unity power factor is  will be converted to kVA; and kVA may be  assumed  multiplied by the estimated power factor  to obtain kW if required   3  Unity power factor is assumed  Different values of power factors  according to load types. 4  Demand and load factors values  Demand and load factors values  are Real  will be selected from tables  values that will document and reflect the  based on the designer estimation  number, the type, the duty rating  and they will be Used to  (continuous, intermittent, periodic, short  calculate the transformer and  time, and varying), and the wattage or  service size.  volt‐ampere rating of equipment supplied  by a common source of power, and the  diversity of operation of equipment  served by the common source.   5  The connected load will be  Actual demand load will be calculated  estimated based on area or  based on summation of individual  population  building connected loads modified by  suitable demand and diversity factors 6  Easy and Fast calculations  economical, cost effective calculations  insuring that items of equipment and  materials are adequate to serve existing,  new, and future load demands    5.2 Preliminary load calculations sub‐methods:  As I indicated before, this method is subdivided into (3) sub‐methods as follows:    1. Space by space (functional area method),   2. Building method.   3. Area method.    Note:  A particular design may use one Preliminary load estimate method or a combination from two or even the three methods.       Page 20 of 41   
  21. 21. Copyrights Reserved for www.Electrical‐Knowhow.com 5.3 Space‐by‐Space Method (functional area method)  In the Space‐by‐Space Method, the building will be divided into different space based on its function like offices, conference halls, corridors and lobbies, shops, parking areas, workshops and etc.  The Load density in (W/ft2) or/and (VA/ft2) is prescribed for these different spaces, these load densities in addition to spaces area will be used to estimate the preliminary electrical load of this building as described in below.     5.3.1 Usage conditions of Space‐by‐Space Method    • The Space‐by‐Space Method is used only for individual spaces in the building.   • The Space‐by‐Space Method may be used for any building or portion of a  building.    5.3.2 Area Measurement in space by space method   The square footage is measured from the outside surface of exterior walls to the centerline of walls between interior partitions of the spaces.  And the sum of the Gross Interior Area equals the total Gross Area of the building.    5.3.3 Method of estimation by using Space‐by‐Space Method   in this method, we have two cases as follows:    • First case: availability of grouped load density (i.e. one value covering all  lighting, general power and power loads) in (W/ft2) or/and (VA/ft2) for each  space.  • Second case: availability of individual load density (i.e. individual values for  lighting, general power and power loads) in (W/ft2) or/and (VA/ft2) for each  space.    First case:   Method of estimation by using Space‐by‐Space Method will be as follows:   1‐ Divide the building into different space based on its function (for example, office,  Page 21 of 41   
  22. 22. To download your complete copy of this course, please Visit the following link:  http://www.electrical‐knowhow.com/2012/12/electrical‐pdf‐courses.html  You can download the Course by just click on itsname. After downloading, you will need to enteryour password to open the file.To get your password, you must be a memberand to be a member you must register by click onthe phrase “Join this site" in left bottom side ofany page, above the images of our members.After finishing your registration, send email toali1973hassan@yahoo.com, asking for yourpassword and I will send it with email reply.   

×