Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
                                                                                                                          ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                      About Author                         ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com     Course Description:          This course is intended to prepare the ta...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                                                           ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                                                           ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Introduction  Electric motors defined as electromechanical devices that...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  3‐ Motor basic parts:  Electric machines are classified into two categori...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Enclosure                                        Enclosure  The enclosu...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                               Open and Enclosed Types   A‐ Open Enclosure ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com at angles up to 15° from vertical cannot enter the interior of the motor w...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com airtight. However, a seal at the point where the shaft passes through the ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com c‐ Explosion‐Proof Enclosure (XP)                              Explosion‐P...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com     •   Division I locations normally have hazardous materials present in ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com The motor stator consists of two main parts:   A‐ Stator Core  The stator ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 4‐ Bearings   Bearings, mounted on the shaft, support the rotor and allow ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com dirty and dusty environmental conditions, and vibration and shocks affecti...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com B‐ Cylindrical roller bearings                                            ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com D‐ Spherical roller thrust bearing                                        ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com between the shaft and the bearing will cause the bearing to wear very quic...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 6‐ Eye Bolt                                                               ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 2‐ DC Motor Basic Parts:                                  DC Motor Basic P...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 3‐ Armature Winding    This winding rotates in the magnetic field set up a...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 6‐ Brushes                                                                ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 8‐ Slot/Teeth    For mechanical support, protection from abrasion, and fur...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                        Classification of Electric Motors   Main Types of M...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  First: DC motors                                                         ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com    2. Sparks from the brushes may cause explosion if the environment conta...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                             The DC motors are divided main...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com   Construction:                             Brushed DC motor Construction ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 2‐ Rotor                                   Rotor (Armature)               ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 3‐ Brushes and Commutator                                 Commutator Examp...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                               Unlike other electric motor ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Types of BDC motors:                                   Types of DC motors ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com     3.   Series‐Wound.     4.   Compound‐Wound.     5.   Separately excite...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Advantages:       1. Since no external field circuit is needed, there are...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Advantages:     1. The current in the field coil and the armature are ind...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Disadvantages:      1. A drawback to SWDC motors is that they do not have...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  E‐ Separately excited DC motor                                           ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com F‐ Universal Motor                                    Universal Motor  The...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com G‐ Servo Motors                                      Servo Motors  Servo M...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com A servo motor mainly consists of a DC motor, gear system, a position senso...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Brushless Direct Current (BLDC) motors are one of the motor types rapidly ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                                The stator of a BLDC motor ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                             BLDC Rotor Magnet Positions  Based on the requ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com    •   Whenever the rotor magnetic poles pass near the Hall sensors, they ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com deceleration rates are not dynamically changing. In these types of applica...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Finally, a comparison between Brushed DC motor (BDC) and Brushless DC moto...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Second: AC Motors    Alternating current (AC) motors use an electrical cur...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Induction Motor: So called because voltage is induced in the rotor (thus n...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Disadvantages:     1. Not easy to have variable speed control.     2. Requ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com This is the immobile part of the motor. A body in cast iron or a light all...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com                                             Induction motors are classifie...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com It consists of thick conducting bars embedded in parallel slots. These bar...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com It has a three‐phase, double‐layer, distributed winding. It is wound for a...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Single Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor:   This category have many...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Shaded‐pole motors have only one main winding and no start winding. Starti...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com    Advantages and disadvantages:      1. The starting torque is low, typic...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Capacitor‐Start   Construction and operation principle:                ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Advantages and disadvantages:      1. Since the capacitor is in series wit...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Advantages:      1. The motor design can easily be altered for use with s...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Advantages     1. This type of motor can be designed for lower full‐load c...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com inductance and a high resistance. Here the current lags the voltage by a s...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com C‐ Universal motor:                                    Universal motor Uni...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 2‐ Three Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor:   Almost 90% of the three‐...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 3‐ Single Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor   This category have many ty...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com The motor has a stator and a rotor but there is no electrical connection b...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Disadvantages of Repulsion Motor:      1. Occurrence of sparks at brushes....
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com A‐ Repulsion‐start induction‐run                                          ...
Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 4‐ Three Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor                       Three P...
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics

16,028 views

Published on

Published in: Design

Course motor 1-an introduction to electrical motors basics

  1. 1.         2012 Course Motor-1: An Introduction to Electrical Motors Basics  Ali Hassan  Certified Energy Manager – AEE ‐USA 
  2. 2. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  About Author    Hi, Im Ali Hassan el‐Ashmawy, I began my career from 1999 as a  site electrical engineer then as area manager from 2001 then as  electrical designer from 2003 then as senior electrical designer  from 2006 and up to date. In my past experience, I designed and construct about 100 projects in different countries like Egypt, Kuwait, Indonesia, KSA, Gabon and Iraq. My designs were approved by many international authorities like USA corps of engineers and USA ministry of exterior – OBO Office. Im certified energy manger CEM from AEE – USA since 2006 and I hope to become a well‐known designer in the field of electrical design.   To contact me please email to Ali1973hassan@yahoo.com        Page 2 of 127   
  3. 3. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Course Description:    This course is intended to prepare the target persons with the ability to understand  and recognize different types, components, theory of operation and applications of  All Electrical Motors.     The target Persons:    Design engineers, new graduate engineers, under graduate engineering students,  site field engineers, maintenance engineers and technicians.    Skills Development:    On completion of this course the target person will be able to:  1. Understand the technology, concepts and terminology of Electrical Motors.  2. Recognize different types, theory of operation, components and accessories  of Electrical Motors.  3. Specify correctly any type of Electrical Motors for certain applications.             Page 3 of 127   
  4. 4. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Table of Contents    Page S/N  Item    No.      1  Introduction     6  2  Principle of How Motors Work     6  3   Motor Basic Parts     7  3.1  AC Motor Basic Parts     7  3.2  DC Motor Basic Parts     21  4  Types of Motor     25  4.1  DC Motors     26  A  1. A Brush DC motors     28  A.1  Permanent Magnet     34  A.2  Shunt‐Wound     35  A.3  Series‐Wound     36  A.4  Compound‐Wound     37  A.5  Separately excited DC motor     38  A.6  Universal Motor     39  A.7  Servo Motors     40  B  1. B Brushless DC motors     41  4.2  Ac Motors     48 4.2.1  Induction motor     48  A  Single Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor     55  A.1  Shaded‐Pole Induction Motors     55  A.2  Split‐Phase AC Induction Motor     56  a  Capacitor‐Start     58  Permanent Split Capacitor (Capacitor Run) AC Induction    b  59  Motor   c  Capacitor Start/Capacitor Run AC Induction Motor     60  d  Resistance‐Start     61  A.3  Universal motor     63  B  Three Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor     64  C  Single Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor     65  C.1  Repulsion motor     65  a  Repulsion‐start Induction‐run motor.     68  b  Repulsion Induction motor     68  D  Three Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor     69 4.2.2  Synchronous motor     71  A  Non‐excited motors.     77  A.1  Reluctance motors.     77  A.2  Hysteresis motors.     80  A.3  Permanent magnet motors.     82  B  DC‐excited motors.     83  B.1  Brush type Synchronous motors     84  B.2  Brushless type Synchronous motors     84  Page 4 of 127   
  5. 5. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Page S/N  Item    No.  C  Stepper motor     86  C.1  Variable‐Reluctance Step Motors     88  C.2  Permanent‐Magnet‐Rotor Step Motors     89  C.3  Hybrid Permanent‐Magnet Step Motors     90 4.2.3  Linear Motors     91  A  Linear induction motor (LIM)     92  B  Linear synchronous motor (LSM)     95  5  Motors Selection Procedures     96  5.1  Ac Motors Selection Procedures     96  A  The power supply     96  B  System requirements     101  C  Motor class     106  D  Motor insulation type     110  E  Motor Duty Cycle Applications    112  F  Bearing type     114  G  Method of mounting the motor     115  H  The cost and size of the motor     119  I  Method of speed control     119  J  Environmental conditions     121  5.2  DC Motor Selection Procedures.     125  Page 5 of 127   
  6. 6. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Introduction  Electric motors defined as electromechanical devices that convert electrical energy to mechanical energy; they are the interface between the electrical and mechanical systems of a facility.  Electric motors are an important part of any electrical system. They used throughout every manufacturing plant, office, and home consuming about 64% of all electricity generated.  There are numerous ways to design a motor, thus there are many different types of motors and each type possess different operating characteristics (that will be listed later). Based on these characteristics the motor can be chosen for a specified application.   2‐ Principle of How Motors Work:   Principle of How Motors Work   1. Electrical current flowing in a loop of wire will produce a magnetic field  across the loop.   2. When this loop is surrounded by the field of another magnet, the loop will  turn, producing a force (called torque) that results in mechanical motion   Page 6 of 127   
  7. 7. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  3‐ Motor basic parts:  Electric machines are classified into two categories D.C. and A.C. motors, the basic parts for each type will be different for each type as follows:   3.1‐ AC Motor Basic Parts:   AC Motor Basic Parts  The basic parts for AC motors are as follows:    1. Enclosure.   2. Stator.   3. Rotor.   4. Bearings.   5. Conduit Box.   6. Eye Bolt.        Page 7 of 127   
  8. 8. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Enclosure    Enclosure  The enclosure consists of a frame (or yoke) and two end brackets (or bearing housings).  A motors enclosure not only holds the motors components together, it also protects the internal components from moisture and containments. The degree of protection depends on the enclosure type. In addition, the type of enclosure affects the motors cooling. There are two categories of enclosures as follows:   • Open Enclosure.  • Totally enclosed Enclosure.   Page 8 of 127   
  9. 9. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Open and Enclosed Types   A‐ Open Enclosure    open drip proof (ODP) enclosure  Open enclosures permit cooling air to flow through the motor. One type of open enclosure is the open drip proof (ODP) enclosure. This enclosure has vents that allow for air flow. Fan blades attached to the rotor move air through the motor when the rotor is turning. The vents are positioned so that liquids and solids falling from above  Page 9 of 127   
  10. 10. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com at angles up to 15° from vertical cannot enter the interior of the motor when the motor is mounted on a horizontal surface. When the motor is mounted on a vertical surface, such as a wall or panel, a special cover may be needed. ODP enclosures should be used in environments free from contaminates.   B‐ Totally enclosed Enclosure   This category will include the following three types:    1. Totally Enclosed Non‐Ventilated Enclosure.   2. Totally Enclosed Fan‐Cooled Enclosure.   3. Explosion‐Proof Enclosure.   a‐ Totally Enclosed Non‐Ventilated Enclosure (TENV)    Totally Enclosed Non‐Ventilated Enclosure (TENV)  In some applications, the air surrounding the motor contains corrosive or harmful elements which can damage the internal parts of a motor. A totally enclosed non‐ventilated (TENV) motor enclosure limits the flow of air into the motor, but is not  Page 10 of 127   
  11. 11. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com airtight. However, a seal at the point where the shaft passes through the housing prevents water, dust, and other foreign matter from entering the motor along the shaft.   Most TENV motors are fractional horsepower. However, integral horsepower TENV motors are used for special applications. The absence of ventilating openings means that all the heat from inside the motor must dissipate through the enclosure by conduction. These larger horsepower TENV motors have an enclosure that is heavily ribbed to help dissipate heat more quickly. TENV motors can be used indoors or outdoors.   b‐ Totally Enclosed Fan‐Cooled Enclosure (TEFC)    Totally Enclosed Fan‐Cooled Enclosure (TEFC)  A totally enclosed fan‐cooled (TEFC) motor is similar to a TENV motor, but has an external fan mounted opposite the drive end of the motor. The fan blows air over the motors exterior for additional cooling. The fan is covered by a shroud to prevent anyone from touching it. TEFC motors can be used in dirty, moist, or mildly corrosive environments.      Page 11 of 127   
  12. 12. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com c‐ Explosion‐Proof Enclosure (XP)    Explosion‐Proof Enclosure (XP)     • Hazardous duty applications are commonly found in chemical processing,  mining, foundry, pulp and paper, waste management, and petrochemical  industries. In these applications, motors have to comply with the strictest  safety standards for the protection of life, machines and the environment.  This often requires use of explosion proof (XP) motors.   • An XP motor is similar in appearance to a TEFC motor, however, most XP  enclosures are cast iron.   Page 12 of 127   
  13. 13. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  • Division I locations normally have hazardous materials present in the  atmosphere.   • Division II locations may have hazardous material present in the atmosphere  under abnormal conditions.   • Locations defined as hazardous, are further defined by the class and group of  hazard. For example,   ‐ Class I, Groups A through D have gases or vapors present.   ‐ Class II, Groups E, F, and G have flammable dust, such as coke or grain dust.   ‐ Class III is not divided into groups. This class involves ignitable fibers and lint.     2‐ Stator    Stator  Page 13 of 127   
  14. 14. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com The motor stator consists of two main parts:   A‐ Stator Core  The stator is the stationary part of the motors electromagnetic circuit. The stator is electrical circuit that performs as electromagnet. The stator core is made up of many thin metal sheets, called laminations. Laminations are used to reduce energy losses that would result if a solid core were used.    B‐ Stator (Windings)  Stator laminations are stacked together forming a hollow cylinder. Coils of insulated wire are inserted into slots of the stator core.   When the assembled motor is in operation, the stator windings are connected directly to the power source. Each grouping of coils, together with the steel core it surrounds, becomes an electromagnet when current is applied. Electromagnetism is the basic principle behind motor operation.    3‐ Rotor    Rotor  The rotor is the rotating part of the motors electromagnetic circuit. Magnetic field from the stator induces an opposing magnetic field onto the rotor causing the rotor to “push” away from the stator field.   There are a lot of rotor types like Squirrel cage rotor and wound rotor, they will be explained later.         Page 14 of 127   
  15. 15. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 4‐ Bearings   Bearings, mounted on the shaft, support the rotor and allow it to turn. Not all bearings are suitable for every application; a universal, all‐purpose bearing does not exist. The choice of bearing arrangement is based on the following qualities:    • Load carrying capacity in the axial and radial direction.  • Overspeed and duration.  • Rotating speed.  • Bearing life.  The size of the bearing to be used is initially selected on the basis of its load carrying capacity, in relation to the load to be carried, and the requirements regarding its life and reliability.   Other factors must also be taken into consideration, such as operating temperature,  Page 15 of 127   
  16. 16. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com dirty and dusty environmental conditions, and vibration and shocks affecting bearings in running and resting conditions.  Bearings Types:   There are many types of bearings on the market, each with different characteristics and different uses, these types are as follows:   A‐ Deep groove ball bearings      Deep groove ball bearings are the most common type of bearing, and can handle both radial and thrust loads. Due to their low‐frictional torque, they are suitable for high speeds.   In a ball bearing, the load is transmitted from the outer race to the ball and from the ball to the inner race.   Since the ball is a sphere, it only contacts the inner and outer race at a very small point, which helps it to spin very smoothly. This also means that there is not very much contact area holding the load, so if the bearing is overloaded, the balls can deform, ruining the bearing.         Page 16 of 127   
  17. 17. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com B‐ Cylindrical roller bearings       These roller bearings are used in applications where they must hold heavy radial loads. In the roller bearing, the roller is a cylinder, so the contact between the inner and outer race is not a point but a line. This spreads the load out over a larger area, allowing the bearing to handle much greater radial loads than a ball bearing.   However, this type of bearing is not designed to handle much thrust loading.   C‐ Angular contact ball bearings      Angular Contact ball bearings have raceways in the inner and outer rings which are displaced with respect to each other in the direction of the bearing axis. This means that they are suitable for the accommodation of combined loads such as simultaneously acting radial and axial loads in vertical machines.     Page 17 of 127   
  18. 18. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com D‐ Spherical roller thrust bearing      In Spherical Roller thrust bearings, the load is transmitted from one raceway to the other at an angle to the bearing axis. They are suitable for the accommodation of high axial loads in addition to simultaneously acting small radial loads. Spherical roller thrust bearings are also self‐aligning.    E‐ Sleeve Bearings      Sleeve bearings have no moving parts, they rely on a thin film of oil to reduce friction and allow the motor shaft to turn freely. This film of oil is critical to the life of a sleeve bearing.   When properly lubricated, there is actually no physical contact between the bearing and the shaft. If for some reason the oil film breaks down, metal‐to‐metal contact  Page 18 of 127   
  19. 19. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com between the shaft and the bearing will cause the bearing to wear very quickly and soon fail   Sleeve bearings are often chosen because of their relatively quiet operation and lower cost compared to ball bearings.   Sleeve bearings can be divided to:   a‐ Flange mounted sleeve bearings  They are used for machines with a shaft height of up to 1120mm. Machines with bearings of this type are quick and easy to align. The air gap between stator and rotor comes from the factory already adjusted, and does not need any further adjustment on site during installation.    b‐ Foot mounted sleeve bearings They are mounted on a pedestal. The pedestal can either be integrated in the stator frame, or can be mounted separately. If it is integrated with the stator frame it is easy and fast to align.     5‐ Conduit Box    Conduit Box   Point of connection of electrical power to the motor’s stator windings.      Page 19 of 127   
  20. 20. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 6‐ Eye Bolt       Eye Bolt  Used to lift heavy motors with a hoist or crane to prevent motor damage.      Page 20 of 127   
  21. 21. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 2‐ DC Motor Basic Parts:    DC Motor Basic Parts  The basic parts for DC motors are as follows:   1‐ Stator   The stator carries the field winding and Poles. The stator together with the rotor constitutes the magnetic circuit or core of the machine. It is a hollow cylinder.   2‐ Rotor   It carries the armature winding. The armature is the load carrying member. The rotor is cylindrical in shape.    Page 21 of 127   
  22. 22. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 3‐ Armature Winding    This winding rotates in the magnetic field set up at the stationary winding (Field winding). It is the load carrying member mounted on the rotor. An armature winding is a continuous winding; that is, it has no beginning or end. It is composed of a number of coils in series.   4‐ Field Winding    This is an exciting system which may be an electrical winding or a permanent magnet and which is located on the stator.   Note: DC Motors are generally classified by how their Armature & Field windings are connected to their DC power supply.   5‐ Commutator         Commutator Winding  The coils on the armature are terminated and interconnected through the commutator which comprised of a number of bars or commutator segments which are insulated from each other. The commutator rotates with the rotor and serves to rectify the induced voltage and the current in the armature both of which are A.C.       Page 22 of 127   
  23. 23. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 6‐ Brushes      Brushes   These are conducting carbon graphite spring loaded to ride on the commutator and act as interface between the external circuit and the armature winding.   7‐ Poles      Poles   The field winding is placed in poles, the number of which is determined by the voltage and current ratings of the machine.        Page 23 of 127   
  24. 24. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 8‐ Slot/Teeth    For mechanical support, protection from abrasion, and further electrical insulation, non‐conducting slot liners are often wedged between the coils and the slot walls. The magnetic material between the slots is called teeth.   9‐ Motor Housing    The motor housing supports the iron core, the brushes and the bearings.      Page 24 of 127   
  25. 25. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Classification of Electric Motors   Main Types of Motor    Electric motors are broadly classified into two categories as follows:   1. AC Motors.  2. DC Motors.  Within those two main categories there are subdivisions as shown in the below image.        Motor Types    Notes:  Recently, with the development of economical and reliable power electronic components, there are numerous ways to design a motor and the classifications of these motors have become less rigorous and many other types of motor have appeared. Our classification of motors will be comprehensive as can as possible.    Page 25 of 127   
  26. 26. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  First: DC motors      DC motors  DC power systems are not very common in the contemporary engineering practice. However, DC motors have been used in industrial applications for years Coupled with a DC drive, DC motors provide very precise control DC motors can be used with conveyors, elevators, extruders, marine applications, material handling, paper, plastics, rubber, steel, and textile applications, automobile, aircraft, and portable electronics, in speed control applications.   Advantages of DC motors:    1. It is easy to control their speed in a wide range; their torque‐speed  characteristic has, historically, been easier to tailor than that of all AC motor  categories. This is why most traction and servo motors have been DC  machines. For example, motors for driving rail vehicles were, until recently,  exclusively DC machines.   2. Their reduced overall dimensions permit a considerable space saving which  let the manufacturer of the machines or of plants not to be conditioned by  the exaggerated dimensions of circular motors.   Disadvantages of DC motors    1. Since they need brushes to connect the rotor winding. Brush wear occurs,  and it increases dramatically in low‐pressure environment. So they cannot be  used in artificial hearts. If used on aircraft, the brushes would need  replacement after one hour of operation.   Page 26 of 127   
  27. 27. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  2. Sparks from the brushes may cause explosion if the environment contains  explosive materials.   3. RF noise from the brushes may interfere with nearby TV sets, or electronic  devices, Etc.  4. DC motors are also expensive relative to AC motors.   Thus all application of DC motors have employed a mechanical switch or commutator to turn the terminal current, which is constant or DC, into alternating current in the armature of the machine. Therefore, DC machines are also called commutating machines.    Types of DC motors:   Types of DC motors  Page 27 of 127   
  28. 28. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com    The DC motors are divided mainly to:    1. Brush DC motors (BDC).  2. Brushless DC motors (BLDC).   1. A Brush DC motors   Brush DC motors  A brushed DC motor (BDC) is an internally commutated electric motor designed to be run from a direct current power source.    Applications:  Brushed DC motors are widely used in applications ranging from toys to push‐button adjustable car seats.   Advantages:  Brushed DC (BDC) motors are inexpensive, easy to drive, and are readily available in all sizes and shapes   Page 28 of 127   
  29. 29. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com   Construction:    Brushed DC motor Construction   All BDC motors are made of the same basic components: a stator, rotor, brushes and a commutator.    1‐ Stator  The stator generates a stationary magnetic field that surrounds the rotor. This field is generated by either permanent magnets or electromagnetic windings.       Page 29 of 127   
  30. 30. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 2‐ Rotor   Rotor (Armature)     The rotor, also called the armature, is made up of one or more windings. When these windings are energized they produce a magnetic field. The magnetic poles of this rotor field will be attracted to the opposite poles generated by the stator, causing the rotor to turn. As the motor turns, the windings are constantly being energized in a different sequence so that the magnetic poles generated by the rotor do not overrun the poles generated in the stator. This switching of the field in the rotor windings is called commutation.         Page 30 of 127   
  31. 31. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 3‐ Brushes and Commutator    Commutator Example         Segments and Brushes   Page 31 of 127   
  32. 32. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com   Unlike other electric motor types (i.e., brushless DC, AC induction), BDC motors do not require a controller to switch current in the motor windings. Instead, the commutation of the windings of a BDC motor is done mechanically. A segmented copper sleeve, called a commutator, resides on the axle of a BDC motor. As the motor turns, carbon brushes (ride on the side of the commutator to provide supply voltage to the motor) slide over the commutator, coming in contact with different segments of the commutator. The segments are attached to different rotor windings, therefore, a dynamic magnetic field is generated inside the motor when a voltage is applied across the brushes of the motor. It is important to note that the brushes and commutator are the parts of a BDC motor that are most prone to wear because they are sliding past each other.   How the Commutator Works:   How the Commutator Works    As the rotor turns, the commutator terminals also turn and continuously reverse polarity of the current it gets from the stationary brushes attached to the battery.          Page 32 of 127   
  33. 33. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Types of BDC motors:    Types of DC motors    The different types of BDC motors are distinguished by the construction of the stator or the way the electromagnetic windings are connected to the power source. These types are:   1. Permanent Magnet.  2. Shunt‐Wound.  Page 33 of 127   
  34. 34. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  3. Series‐Wound.  4. Compound‐Wound.  5. Separately excited DC motor.  6. Universal Motor.  7. Servo Motors.   A‐ Permanent Magnet     Permanent Magnet Motor  A permanent magnet DC (PMDC) motor is a motor whose poles are made out of permanent magnets to produce the stator field.   Page 34 of 127   
  35. 35. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Advantages:    1. Since no external field circuit is needed, there are no field circuit copper  losses.  2. Since no field windings are needed, these motors can be considerable  smaller.   3. Widely used in low power application.  4. Field winding is replaced by a permanent magnet (simple construction and  less space).  5. No requirement on external excitation.  Disadvantages:   1. Since permanent magnets produces weaker flux densities then externally  supported shunt fields, such motors have lower induced torque.   2. There is always a risk of demagnetization from extensive heating or from  armature reaction effects (Some PMDC motors have windings built into them  to prevent this from happening).    B‐ Shunt‐Wound    Shunt‐Wound Motor  Shunt‐wound Brushed DC (SHWDC) motors have the field coil in parallel (shunt) with the armature.  The speed is practically constant independent of the load and therefore suitable for commercial applications with a low starting load, such as centrifugal pump, machine tools, blowers fans, reciprocating pumps, etc.   Page 35 of 127   
  36. 36. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Advantages:   1. The current in the field coil and the armature are independent of one  another. as a result, these motors have excellent speed control.   2. Loss of magnetism is not an issue in SHWDC motors so they are generally  more robust than PMDC motors.   3. Speed can be controlled by either inserting a resistance in series with the  armature (decreasing speed) or by inserting resistance in the field current  (increasing speed).  Disadvantages:    1. Shunt‐wound Brushed DC (SHWDC) motors have drawbacks in reversing  applications, however, because winding direction relative to the shunt  winding must be reversed when armature voltage is reversed. Here, reversing  contactors must be used.    C‐ Series‐Wound      Series‐Wound Motor  Series‐wound Brushed DC (SWDC) motors have the field coil in series with the armature. These motors are ideally suited for high‐torque applications such as traction vehicles (cranes and hoists, electric trains, conveyors, elevators, electric cars) because the current in both the stator and armature increases under load.   Advantages:   1. The torque is proportional to I2 so it gives the highest torque per current  ratio over all other dc motors.   Page 36 of 127   
  37. 37. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Disadvantages:   1. A drawback to SWDC motors is that they do not have precise speed control  like PMDC and SHWDC motors have.   2. Speed is restricted to 5000 RPM.   3. It must be avoided to run a series motor with no load because the motor will  accelerate uncontrollably.    D‐ Compound‐Wound     Compound‐Wound Motor  Compound Wound (CWDC) motors are a combination of shunt‐wound and series‐wound motors.   CWDC motors employ both a series and a shunt field. The performance of a CWDC motor is a combination of SWDC and SHWDC motors. CWDC motors have higher torque than a SHWDC motor while offering better speed control than SWDC motor.   It is used in Applications such as Rolling mills, sudden temporary loads, heavy machine tools, punches, etc.   Advantages:   1. This motor has a good starting torque and a stable speed.    Disadvantages:   1. The no‐load speed is controllable unlike in series motors.   Page 37 of 127   
  38. 38. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  E‐ Separately excited DC motor      Separately excited DC motor  In a separately excited DC motor the field coils are supplied from an independent source, such as a motor‐generator and the field current is unaffected by changes in the armature current. The separately excited DC motor was sometimes used in DC traction motors to facilitate control of wheel slip.        Page 38 of 127   
  39. 39. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com F‐ Universal Motor   Universal Motor  The universal motor is a rotating electrical machine similar to DC series motor, designed to operate either from AD or DC source. The stator & rotor windings of the motor are connected in series through the rotor commutator. The series motor is designed to move large loads with high torque in applications such as crane motor or lift hoist.       Page 39 of 127   
  40. 40. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com G‐ Servo Motors   Servo Motors  Servo Motors are mechanical devices that can be instructed to move the output shaft attached to a servo wheel or arm to a specified position. Servo Motors are designed for applications involving position control, velocity control and torque control.    Servo Motors Components Page 40 of 127   
  41. 41. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com A servo motor mainly consists of a DC motor, gear system, a position sensor which is mostly a potentiometer, and control electronics.   Servo Motors Applications 2‐  Brushless DC motors    Brushless DC motors    In brushes DC motors, the mechanical commutator and associated brushes are problematical for a number of reasons as follows:    1. Brush wear occurs, and it increases dramatically in low‐pressure  environment.   2. Sparks from the brushes may cause explosion if the environment contains  explosive materials.   3. RF noise from the brushes may interfere with nearby TV sets, or electronic  devices, etc.   Page 41 of 127   
  42. 42. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Brushless Direct Current (BLDC) motors are one of the motor types rapidly gaining popularity. BLDC motors are used in industries such as Appliances, Automotive, Aerospace, Consumer, Medical, Industrial Automation Equipment and Instrumentation.   As the name implies, BLDC motors do not use brushes for commutation; instead, they are electronically commutated.  BLDC motors have many advantages over brushed DC motors and induction motors, a few of these are:    1. Better speed versus torque characteristics.  2. High dynamic response.  3. High efficiency.  4. Long operating life.  5. Noiseless operation.  6. Higher speed ranges.  In addition, the ratio of torque delivered to the size of the motor is higher, making it useful in applications where space and weight are critical factors.   Construction  BLDC motors are a type of synchronous motor. This means the magnetic field generated by the stator and the magnetic field generated by the rotor rotates at the same frequency.   BLDC motors come in single‐phase, 2‐phase and 3‐phase configurations. Corresponding to its type, the stator has the same number of windings. Out of these, 3‐phase motors are the most popular and widely used.   1‐ Stator       Stator of a BLDC Motor  Page 42 of 127   
  43. 43. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com   The stator of a BLDC motor consists of stacked steel laminations with windings placed in the slots that are axially cut along the inner periphery.   Most BLDC motors have three stator windings connected in star fashion. Each of these windings is constructed with numerous coils interconnected to form a winding. One or more coils are placed in the slots and they are interconnected to make a winding. Each of these windings is distributed over the stator periphery to form an even numbers of poles.   Depending upon the control power supply capability, the motor with the correct voltage rating of the stator can be chosen. Forty‐eight volts, or less voltage rated motors are used in automotive, robotics, small arm movements and so on. Motors with 100 volts, or higher ratings, are used in appliances, automation and in industrial applications.    2‐ Rotor      Rotor of a BLDC Motor  The rotor is made of permanent magnet and can vary from two to eight pole pairs with alternate North (N) and South (S) poles.     Page 43 of 127   
  44. 44. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  BLDC Rotor Magnet Positions  Based on the required magnetic field density in the rotor, the proper magnetic material is chosen to make the rotor. Ferrite magnets are traditionally used to make permanent magnets.  3‐ Hall Sensors    BLDC Hall Sensors   • Unlike a brushed DC motor, the commutation of a BLDC motor is controlled  electronically. To rotate the BLDC motor, the stator windings should be  energized in a sequence. It is important to know the rotor position in order to  understand which winding will be energized following the energizing  sequence. Rotor position is sensed using Hall Effect sensors embedded into  the stator.   • Most BLDC motors have three Hall sensors embedded into the stator on the  non‐driving end of the motor.   Page 44 of 127   
  45. 45. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  • Whenever the rotor magnetic poles pass near the Hall sensors, they give a  high or low signal, indicating the N or S pole is passing near the sensors.  Based on the combination of these three Hall sensor signals, the exact  sequence of commutation can be determined.   • Based on the physical position of the Hall sensors, there are two versions of  output. The Hall sensors may be at 60° or 120° phase shift to each other.  Based on this, the motor manufacturer defines the commutation sequence,  which should be followed when controlling the motor.   • Note: The Hall sensors require a power supply. The voltage may range from 4  volts to 24 volts. Required current can range from 5 to 15 mAmps.    Theory of Operation   • Each commutation sequence has one of the windings energized to positive  power (current enters into the winding), the second winding is negative  (current exits the winding) and the third is in a non‐energized condition.   • Torque is produced because of the interaction between the magnetic field  generated by the stator coils and the permanent magnets of the rotor.   • In order to keep the motor running, the magnetic field produced by the  windings should shift position, as the rotor moves to catch up with the stator  field. What is known as “Six‐Step Commutation” defines the sequence of  energizing the windings.   • In six‐step commutation, only two out of the three Brushless DC Motor  windings are used at a time. Steps are equivalent to 60 electrical degrees, so  six steps make a full, 360 degree rotation. One full 360 degree loop is able to  control the current, due to the fact that there is only one current path. Six‐ step commutation is typically useful in applications requiring high speed and  commutation frequencies. A six‐step Brushless DC Motor usually has lower  torque efficiency than a sine‐wave commutated motor.   Typical BLDC Motor Applications    We can categorize the type of BLDC motor control into three major types:   1. Constant load.  2. Varying loads.  3. Positioning applications.   1‐ Applications with Constant Loads: These are the types of applications where a variable speed is more important than keeping the accuracy of the speed at a set speed. In addition, the acceleration and  Page 45 of 127   
  46. 46. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com deceleration rates are not dynamically changing. In these types of applications, the load is directly coupled to the motor shaft.  For example, fans, pumps and blowers come under these types of applications. These applications demand low‐cost controllers, mostly operating in open‐loop.    2‐ Applications with Varying Loads:  These are the types of applications where the load on the motor varies over a speed range. These applications may demand high‐speed control accuracy and good dynamic responses.   For example,  • In home appliances: washers, dryers and compressors.   • In automotive, fuel pump control, electronic steering control, engine control  and electric vehicle control.   • In aerospace, there are a number of applications, like centrifuges, pumps,  robotic arm controls, gyroscope controls and so on.   • These applications may use speed feedback devices and may run in semi‐ closed loop or in total closed loop.    3‐ Positioning Applications:  Most of the industrial and automation types of application come under this category. The applications in this category have some kind of power transmission, which could be mechanical gears or timer belts, or a simple belt driven system. In these applications, the dynamic response of speed and torque are important. Also, these applications may have frequent reversal of rotation direction. These systems mostly operate in closed loop.       Page 46 of 127   
  47. 47. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Finally, a comparison between Brushed DC motor (BDC) and Brushless DC motor (BLDC) is as shown in the below image.             Page 47 of 127   
  48. 48. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Second: AC Motors    Alternating current (AC) motors use an electrical current, which reverses its direction at regular intervals.   The main advantage of DC motors over AC motors is that speed is more difficult to control for AC motors. To compensate for this, AC motors can be equipped with variable frequency drives but the improved speed control comes together with a reduced power quality.    Types of AC Motors:       AC motors in common use today may be divided into two broad categories:    1. Induction (asynchronous) motors.   2. Synchronous motors.   3. Linear Motors.   These two types of motors differ in how the rotor field excitation is supplied as follows:   For induction motors, there is no externally‐applied rotor excitation, and current is instead induced into the rotor windings due to the rotating stator magnetic field.   For synchronous motors, a field excitation is applied to the rotor windings. This difference in field excitation leads to differences in motor characteristics, which leads in turn to different protection and control requirements for each motor type.    1‐ Induction motor  Induction motors are the most common motors used for various equipments in industry.    Page 48 of 127   
  49. 49. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Induction Motor: So called because voltage is induced in the rotor (thus no need for brushes), but for this to happen, the rotate than rotor must at a lower speed the magnetic field to allow for the existence of an induced voltage.   Therefore a new term is needed to describe the induction motor which is the slip.    The slip:  A driving torque can only exist if there is an induced current in the shading ring. It is determined by the current in the ring and can only exist if there is a flux variation in the ring. Therefore, there must be a difference in speed in the shading ring and the rotating field. This is why an electric motor operating to the principle described above is called an “asynchronous motor”.   The difference between the synchronous speed (Ns) and the shading ring speed (N) is called “slip” (s) and is expressed as a percentage of the synchronous speed.   S= (Nsyn – Nm)/ Nsyn   Where s is the slip. Slip is one of the most important variables in the control and operation of induction machines.   s = 0 : if the rotor runs at synchronous speed.  s = 1 : if the rotor is stationary.  s is –ve : if the rotor runs at a speed above the synchronous speed.  s is +ve : if the rotor runs at a speed below the synchronous speed.    Advantages:   1. Simple design, rugged, low‐price, easy maintenance.  2. Wide range of power ratings: fractional horsepower to 10 MW.  3. Run essentially as constant speed from no‐load to full load.  4. Its speed depends on the frequency of the power source.  5. Most popular motor today in the low and medium horsepower range.  6. Very robust in construction.  7. Have replaced DC Motors in areas where traditional DC Motors cannot be  used such as mining or explosive environments Of two types depending on  motor construction; Squirrel Cage or Slip Ring.     Page 49 of 127   
  50. 50. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Disadvantages:  1. Not easy to have variable speed control.  2. Requires a variable‐frequency power‐electronic drive for optimal speed  control.  3. Most of them run with a lagging power factor.   Principle of operation:   • The stator is usually connected to the grid and, thus, the stator is  magnetized.   • Stator magnetic field cuts the rotor windings and produces an induced  voltage in the rotor windings.   • Due to the fact that the rotor windings are short circuited, for both squirrel  cage and wound‐rotor, and induced current flows in the rotor windings.   • The rotor current produces another magnetic field.   • A torque is produced as a result of the interaction of those two magnetic  fields.   Construction:   An induction motor has two main parts   1‐ Stator     Induction Motor Stator  Page 50 of 127   
  51. 51. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com This is the immobile part of the motor. A body in cast iron or a light alloy houses a ring of thin silicon steel plates (around 0.5mm thick). The plates are insulated from each other by oxidation or an insulating varnish. The “lamination” of the magnetic circuit reduces losses by hysteresis and eddy currents.   The plates have notches for the stator windings that will produce the rotating field to fit into (three windings for a 3‐phase motor). Each winding is made up of several coils. The way the coils are joined together determines the number of pairs of poles on the motor and hence the speed of rotation.    2‐ Rotor   This is the mobile part of the motor. Like the magnetic circuit of the stator, it consists of stacked plates insulated from each other and forming a cylinder keyed to the motor shaft.    Types of Induction Motors    Types of Induction Motors  Page 51 of 127   
  52. 52. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com   Induction motors are classified according to the Rotor Type as follows:  A‐ Squirrel‐Cage Rotor:              Squirrel‐Cage Rotor  Page 52 of 127   
  53. 53. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com It consists of thick conducting bars embedded in parallel slots. These bars are short‐circuited at both ends by means of short‐circuiting rings.    B‐ Wound Rotor:         Wound Rotor  Page 53 of 127   
  54. 54. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com It has a three‐phase, double‐layer, distributed winding. It is wound for as many poles as the stator. The three phases are wired internally and the other ends are connected to slip‐rings mounted on a shaft with brushes resting on them.   Each of the two types of Induction motors above can be classified into two main groups as follows:    I‐ Single‐phase induction motors:  These only have one stator winding, operate with a single‐phase power supply, have a squirrel cage rotor, and require a device to get the motor started. This is by far the most common type of motor used in household appliances, such as fans, washing machines and clothes dryers, and for applications for up to 3 to 4 horsepower.   Single phase induction motors come also with wound rotor which has excellent starting and accelerating characteristics, and they are ideal for Value Operators, Farm Motor Applications, Hoists, Floor Maintenance Machines, Air Compressors, Laundry Equipment and Mining Equipment.    II‐ Three‐phase induction motors:  The rotating magnetic field is produced by the balanced three‐phase supply. These motors have high power capabilities, can have squirrel cage or wound rotors (although 90% have a squirrel cage rotor), and are self‐starting. It is estimated that about 70% of motors in industry are of this type, are used in, for example, pumps, compressors, conveyor belts, heavy‐duty electrical networks, and grinders. They are available in 1/3 to hundreds of horsepower ratings.   Now, let us see the first classification of induction motors based on the above types:         Page 54 of 127   
  55. 55. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Single Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor:   This category have many types as shown in the below image.     A‐ Shaded‐Pole Induction Motors   Construction and operation principle:     Shaded‐Pole Induction Motors   Page 55 of 127   
  56. 56. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Shaded‐pole motors have only one main winding and no start winding. Starting is by means of a design that rings a continuous copper loop around a small portion of each of the motor poles. This “shades” that portion of the pole, causing the magnetic field in the shaded area to lag behind the field in the unshaded area. The reaction of the two fields gets the shaft rotating.    Advantages:    1. Because the shaded‐pole motor lacks a start winding, starting switch or  capacitor, it is electrically simple and inexpensive.   2. The speed can be controlled merely by varying voltage, or through a multi‐ tap winding.   3. Mechanically, the shaded‐pole motor construction allows high‐volume  production.   4. These are usually considered as “disposable” motors, meaning they are much  cheaper to replace than to repair.   Disadvantages:   1. It’s low starting torque is typically 25% to 75% of the rated torque.   2. It is a high slip motor with a running speed 7% to 10% below the synchronous  speed.   3. Generally, efficiency of this motor type is very low (below 20%).   Applications:  The low initial cost suits the shaded‐pole motors to low horsepower or light duty applications. Perhaps their largest use is in multi‐speed fans for household use. But the low torque, low efficiency and less sturdy mechanical features make shaded‐pole motors impractical for most industrial or commercial use, where higher cycle rates or continuous duty are the norm.   B‐ Split‐Phase AC Induction Motor    Construction and operation principle:  The split‐phase motor is also known as an induction start/induction run motor. It has two windings: a start and a main winding. The start winding is made with smaller gauge wire and fewer turns, relative to the main winding to create more resistance, thus putting the start winding’s field at a different angle than that of the main winding which causes the motor to start rotating. The main winding, which is of a heavier wire, keeps the motor running the rest of the time.   Page 56 of 127   
  57. 57. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com    Advantages and disadvantages:   1. The starting torque is low, typically 100% to 175% of the rated torque.   2. The motor draws high starting current, approximately 700% to 1,000% of the  rated current.   3. The maximum generated torque ranges from 250% to 350% of the rated  torque.   Applications:   Good applications for split‐phase motors include small grinders, small fans and blowers and other low starting torque applications with power needs from 1/20 to 1/3 hp. Avoid using this type of motor in any applications requiring high on/off cycle rates or high torque.   Types:  Split‐phase motors are designed to use inductance, capacitance, or resistance to develop a starting torque and so, they have many types as follows:    1. Capacitor‐Start.  2. Permanent Split Capacitor (Capacitor Run) AC Induction Motor.  3. Capacitor Start/Capacitor Run AC Induction Motor.  4. Resistance‐Start.        Page 57 of 127   
  58. 58. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 1‐ Capacitor‐Start   Construction and operation principle:      Capacitor‐Start Split‐Phase AC Induction Motor  The stator consists of the main winding and a starting winding (auxiliary). The starting winding is connected in parallel with the main winding and is placed physically at right angles to it. A 90‐degree electrical phase difference between the two windings is obtained by connecting the auxiliary winding in series with a capacitor and starting switch.   (because X C about equals R). The main winding has enough resistance‐inductance (referred to as inductive reactance and expressed as XL) to cause t When the motor is first energized, the starting switch is closed. This places the capacitor in series with the auxiliary winding. The capacitor is of such value that the auxiliary circuit is effectively a resistive‐capacitive circuit (referred to as capacitive reactance and expressed as XC). In this circuit the current leads the line voltage by about 45ºout of phase ‐ so are the magnetic fields that are generated. The effect is that the two windings act like a two‐phase stator and produce the rotating field required to start the motor. (because X L about equals R). The currents in each winding are therefore 90º he current to lag the line voltage by about 45º   When nearly full speed is obtained (75% of Rated speed), a centrifugal device (the starting switch) cuts out the starting winding. The motor then runs as a plain single‐phase induction motor. Since the auxiliary winding is only a light winding, the motor does not develop sufficient torque to start heavy loads. Split‐phase motors, therefore, come only in small sizes.   Page 58 of 127   
  59. 59. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Advantages and disadvantages:   1. Since the capacitor is in series with the start circuit, it creates more starting  torque, typically 200% to 400% of the rated torque.   2. The starting current, usually 450% to 575% of the rated current, is much  lower than the split‐phase due to the larger wire in the start circuit.   3. Sizes range from fractional to 10 hp at 900 to 3600 rpm.    2‐ Permanent Split Capacitor (Capacitor Run) AC Induction Motor    Construction and operation principle:   Permanent Split Capacitor (Capacitor Run) AC Induction Motor  A permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor has a run type capacitor permanently connected in series with the start winding. This makes the start winding an auxiliary winding once the motor reaches the running speed.   Since the run capacitor must be designed for continuous use, it cannot provide the starting boost of a starting capacitor.   The typical starting torque of the PSC motor is low, from 30% to 150% of the rated torque.   PSC motors have low starting current, usually less than 200% of the rated current, making them excellent for applications with high on/off cycle rates.   Page 59 of 127   
  60. 60. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com  Advantages:   1. The motor design can easily be altered for use with speed controllers.   2. They can also be designed for optimum efficiency and High‐Power Factor (PF)  at the rated load.   3. They’re considered to be the most reliable of the single‐phase motors, mainly  because no centrifugal starting switch is required.   Applications:  Permanent split‐capacitor motors have a wide variety of applications depending on the design. These include fans, blowers with low starting torque needs and intermittent cycling uses, such as adjusting mechanisms, gate operators and garage door openers.    3‐ Capacitor Start/Capacitor Run AC Induction Motor   Construction and operation principle:      Capacitor Start/Capacitor Run  Split‐Phase AC Induction Motor  This motor has a start type capacitor in series with the auxiliary winding like the capacitor start motor for high starting torque. Like a PSC motor, it also has a run type capacitor that is in series with the auxiliary winding after the start capacitor is switched out of the circuit. This allows high overload torque.     Page 60 of 127   
  61. 61. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Advantages   1. This type of motor can be designed for lower full‐load currents and higher  efficiency   Disadvantages   1. This motor is costly due to start and run capacitors and centrifugal switch.   Applications   It is able to handle applications too demanding for any other kind of single‐phase motor. These include woodworking machinery, air compressors, high‐pressure water pumps, vacuum pumps and other high torque applications requiring 1 to 10 hp.     4‐ Resistance‐Start    Construction and operation principle:     Resistance‐Start  Split‐Phase AC Induction Motor     A modified version of the capacitor start motor is the resistance start motor. In this motor type, the starting capacitor is replaced by a resistor. This motor also has a starting winding in addition to the main winding. It is switched in and out of the circuit just as it was in the capacitor‐start motor. The starting winding is positioned at right angles to the main winding. The electrical phase shift between the currents in the two windings is obtained by making the impedance of the windings unequal. The main winding has a high inductance and a low resistance. The current, therefore, lags the voltage by a large angle. The starting winding is designed to have a fairly low  Page 61 of 127   
  62. 62. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com inductance and a high resistance. Here the current lags the voltage by a smaller angle.    For maximum starting torque, the 30‐degree phase difference still generates a rotating field. This supplies enough torque to start the motor. When the motor comes up to speed, a speed‐controlled switch disconnects the starting winding from the line, and the motor continues to run as an induction motor. The starting torque is not as great as it is in the capacitor‐start. For example, suppose the current in the main winding lags the voltage by 70º. The current in the auxiliary winding lags the voltage by 40º. The currents are, therefore, out of phase by 30º. The magnetic fields are out of phase by the same amount. Although the ideal angular phase difference is 90º  Applications, Advantages and disadvantages:   The resistance start motor is used in applications where the starting torque requirement is less than that provided by the capacitor start motor. Apart from the cost, this motor does not offer any major advantage over the capacitor start motor.    A comparison for the popular types of a split phase motors is shown in the below image.        Page 62 of 127   
  63. 63. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com C‐ Universal motor:   Universal motor Universal motors are mostly operated on AC power, but they can operate on either AC or DC. Tools and appliances are among the most frequent applications.  Please review the previous topic “Classification of Electric Motors – Part One” for more information about Universal motor.        Page 63 of 127   
  64. 64. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 2‐ Three Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor:   Almost 90% of the three‐phase AC Induction motors are of Squirrel Cage type. Here, the rotor is of the squirrel cage type and it works as explained earlier. The power ratings range from one‐third to several hundred horsepower in the three‐phase motors. Motors of this type rated one horsepower or larger, cost less and can start heavier loads than their single‐phase counterparts.   Three phase Squirrel cage Induction motors are classified by application with a design letter which gives an indication of key performance characteristics of the motor, these classification are made by NEMA and IEC. The main Classifications of Three phase Squirrel cage Induction motors are shown in the below image.    Three Phase, Squirrel Cage, Induction Motor  Page 64 of 127   
  65. 65. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 3‐ Single Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor   This category have many types as shown in the below image.    A‐ Repulsion motor   Construction:     Repulsion motor  Page 65 of 127   
  66. 66. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com The motor has a stator and a rotor but there is no electrical connection between the two and the rotor current is generated by induction. The rotor winding is connected to a commutator which is in contact with a pair of short‐circuited brushes which can be moved to change their angular position relative to an imaginary line drawn through the axis of the stator. The motor can be started, stopped and reversed, and the speed can be varied, simply by changing the angular position of the brushes.      The principle difference between an AC series motor and repulsion motors is the way in which power is supplied to armature. In Ac series motor the armature receives voltage by conduction through the power supply. But In repulsion motors the armature is supplied by induction from the stator windings.    Page 66 of 127   
  67. 67. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com Disadvantages of Repulsion Motor:    1. Occurrence of sparks at brushes.   2. Commutator and brushes wear out quickly. This is primarily due to arcing and  heat generated at brush assembly.   3. The power factor is poor at low speeds.   4. No load speed is very high and dangerous.   Application of Repulsion motors:  Because of excellent starting and accelerating characteristics, repulsion‐induction motors are ideal for:   1. Value Operators.   2. Farm Motor Applications.   3. Hoists.   4. Floor Maintenance Machines.   5. Air Compressors.   6. Laundry Equipment.   7. Mining Equipment.    Types:   The various types of motors which works under the repulsion principle are:   1. Repulsion‐start Induction‐run motor.   2. Repulsion Induction motor.         Page 67 of 127   
  68. 68. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com A‐ Repulsion‐start induction‐run       A repulsion‐start induction motor is a single phase motor having the same windings as a repulsion motor , When an induction motor drives a hard starting load like a compressor, the high starting torque of the repulsion motor may be put to use. The induction motor rotor windings are brought out to commutator segments for starting by a pair of shorted brushes. At near running speed, a centrifugal switch shorts out all commutator segments, giving the effect of a squirrel cage rotor, the brushes may also be lifted to prolong bush life. This means that they started as repulsion motors but running as induction motor Starting torque is 300% to 600% of the full speed value as compared to under 200% for a pure induction motor.     B‐ Repulsion‐Induction Motor    A repulsion‐induction motor is a form of repulsion motor which has a squirrel‐cage winding in the rotor in addition to the repulsion motor winding. A motor of this type may have either a constant speed or varying‐speed characteristic.       Page 68 of 127   
  69. 69. Copy Rights to: alihassanelashmawy.blogspot.com 4‐ Three Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor    Three Phase, Wound Rotor, Induction Motor   • This type of 3‐phase induction motor has high starting torque, which makes it  ideal for applications where standard NEMA design motors fall short. The  wound‐rotor motor is particularly effective in applications where using a  squirrel‐cage motor may result in a starting current thats too high for the  capacity of the power system.   • In addition, the wound‐rotor motor is appropriate for high‐inertia loads  having a long acceleration time.   • The slip‐ring motor or wound‐rotor motor is a variation of the squirrel cage  induction motor. While the stator is the same as that of the squirrel cage  motor, it has a set of windings on the rotor which are not short‐circuited, but  are terminated to a set of slip rings. These are helpful in adding external  resistors and contactors.    Page 69 of 127   

×