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Second Generation Biofuels - Waste to Energy

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The amount of municipal waste generated in a country is related to the rate of urbanisation, the types and patterns of consumption, household revenue and lifestyles. While municipal waste is only one part of total waste generated in each country, its management and treatment often absorbs more than one third of the public sector's financial efforts to abate and control pollution.
"Dynamic harmony between equitable availability of energy-intensive goods and services to all people and the preservation of the earth for future generations." And, "the solution will lie in finding sustainable energy sources and more efficient means of converting and utilizing energy." – Sustainable energy by J. W. Tester, et al., from MIT Press.

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Second Generation Biofuels - Waste to Energy

  1. 1. Second Generation Biofuel – Waste to Energy The amount of municipal waste generated in a country is related to the rate of urbanisation, the types and patterns of consumption, household revenue and lifestyles. While municipal waste is only one part of total waste generated in each country, its management and treatment often absorbs more than one third of the public sector's financial efforts to abate and control pollution. 2 SWOT Analysis 10 Operational Efficiency 11 Appendices 19 Required Reading Prepared by Frank Alfieri July 20, 2013 Updated August 6, 2014
  2. 2. For business consulting advisory services and/or a more detailed analysis of your industry specific Supply Chain please contact me at : frank.alfieri@videotron.ca Services include in depth analysis of your business and industry with unbiased advice to analyze and optimize your industry specific challenges. Custom Services Include: Business Assessment – Measures business health and positioning. Big Data – Are you making the most use of your data streams? Data Integrity Evaluation – Is your IT system giving you the right numbers? Data Intelligence Analytics – Extracting Business Value – What is your data worth? Data Management at Project Implementation - Is your data as clean as possible? Supply Chain Analysis and Optimization – Are you running a lean operation? Market Research Intelligence Services – What is the industry doing? White Paper Research and Intelligence – What information is important? Competitor and Industry Analysis – What are your competitors doing? Process Re-organization – Are your processes leaking valuable dollars? Powerpoint Summaries – Present with confidence and clarity. The information format that has been consolidated and reported in this document is Copyrighted. For publishing or usage rights please contact Frank Alfieri.
  3. 3. Strengths Second Generation Biofuels  Feedstock Advantage (Municipal Solid Waste)  Zero cost of cultivation, land use, and transport (compared to corn and sugarcane) (Forward to appendix 1)  Negative Value based on tipping fees in waste management  Collection and transportation infrastructure already in place  Classified as advanced biofuel; hence no competition for government subsidies  Cost profile of feedstock will allow companies to compete with a massively scaled energy commodities like oil  Feedstock readily available and growing in urbanized economies (Forward to Appendix 3)
  4. 4. Strengths Second Generation Biofuels  Technology  Proprietary technology for advanced biofuels through gasification and pyrolysis  Over 3700 hours operation of pilot facility (Sherbrooke)  Technology does not require the use arable land to produce feedstock  Buy in from both ends (major players) of the supply chain
  5. 5. Strengths Second Generation Biofuels  Industrialization – Economic Development  Reducing dependance on oil (Local fuel in your tank)  Creating business value (fuel and intermediates) from a dormant commodity  Lower demand for landfilling sites (disposal and maintenance costs)  Implementation of new local industry (prod. of advanced biofuels)  Direct contribution for meeting local “renewable fuels standards”  Reduce costs for local governments in waste management
  6. 6. Strengths Second Generation Biofuels  Environmental  Net energy efficiency gains  Contributions to “Green” environmental plans  Partner with local public interests and governments  Reduction of CO2 footprint  Less methane from landfill  Cleaner emissions than fossil based fueled vehicles  Reduction of GHG (greenhouse gas emissions)
  7. 7. Weaknesses  Ethanol consumption rates; Will they be sustainable?  Subsidies may be required to compete with fossil fuels  Market penetration for Middle East?  Diversion rates for waste recycling may reduce feedstock availability  US Market  US Dept of Energy grant ($50m) will sunset in 2015  Limited technology pathways when compared to oil  Although renewable in its sources, MSW is still an inferior feedstock in its heterogeneous composition
  8. 8. Opportunities  Waste Management Partnerships  Promote technology to waste management companies  Environmental Solutions  Target financing from Environmental Solutions companies by promoting green technology  Standardization  Maximize standardization of modular processing manufacturing facilities to leverage “economies of scale”  Streamline costs by optimizing efficiency through value engineering of manufacturing facility “MRO” (maintenance, repair, and overhaul)  Emerging Technologies (future applications)  Productively promote the use of intermediate commodities and ethanol to keep the demand curve in a positive value state
  9. 9. Opportunities  International Expansion Strategy  Study world markets based on:  Potential to produce waste (and challenges for managing it) (Appendix 4) (Appendix 4A)  Consumption of Ethanol (Appendix 5)  Legislation on renewable fuels initiatives  Waste management and recycling practices  Sustainable Materials Management Lifecycles (Appendix 7)  Oil Export / Import net balances Target net import nations to reduce deficits (Appendix 6)
  10. 10. Threats  Supplier Contractual Agreements (Legal)  Effectively manage the risk associated with IP (Intellectual Property)  Technology; Engineering Drawings  Keep gasification and WtE pyrolysis technology proprietary  Oil & Gas Companies (Industrial)  May want to buy into emerging technologies for renewable fuels  Threat to their business model  Commodity Spreads (Market based)  Market watch for evaluation of base commodity (MSW)  Market watch for output commodities (intermediaries and ethanol)  Competitive Landscape (Technological)  Consumer home based ethanol production units (Efuel microfueler)  Industry competition (Ineos BIO; Coskata; Fiberight, etc)  Alternative green energy sources (Solar; Wind; Hydro;Geothermal)
  11. 11. Operational Efficiency  Use Advanced Diagnostics for modular equipment and controls  Data management for plant operations  Manage input, process, and output  Monitor plant efficiency for every occurance of MRO  Use Diagnostic Data to Secure Service Contracts  Main supplier contracts should include long term service contracts  Leverage data analytics to revert maintenance risk to suppliers  Calculate costs for both scheduled and unscheduled events  Negotiate long term “cost per hour” contracts  Parts Availability and Logistics  Optimize plant operations with MRO savings initiatives  Negotiate “fill rates” for serviceable components  Negotiate “spare parts” pricing at contract outset to save costs upfront
  12. 12. Click to Link to web source Appendix 1 Return to Slideshow
  13. 13. Appendix 2 University of Manitoba study Pratt & Whitney emerging technologies Return to Slideshow
  14. 14. Appendix 3 Click to Link to web source Return to Slideshow
  15. 15. Appendix 4 Click to Link to web source Return to Slideshow Click to Link to web source
  16. 16. Appendix 4A Click to Link to web source Return to Slideshow
  17. 17. Appendix 5 Click to Link to web source Return to Slideshow World Ethanol Consumption Map
  18. 18. Appendix 6 Click to Link to web source Return to Slideshow
  19. 19. Appendix 7 Click to Link to web source Return to Slideshow
  20. 20. Second Generation Biofuels Required Reading University of Waterloo_Environment Energy and the Economic Values of Non Recycled Plastics The Conference Board of Canada Ethanol`s Potential Contribution to Canada`s Transportation Sector US Department of Energy Municipal Solid Waste to Liquid Fuels Synthesis Availability of Feedstock Technology OECD Policy Review Green Growth Policy Brief
  21. 21. For business consulting advisory services and/or a more detailed analysis of your industry specific Supply Chain please contact me at : frank.alfieri@videotron.ca Services include in depth analysis of your business and industry with unbiased advice to analyze and optimize your industry specific challenges. Custom Services Include: Business Assessment – Measures business health and positioning. Big Data – Are you making the most use of your data streams? Data Integrity Evaluation – Is your IT system giving you the right numbers? Data Intelligence Analytics – Extracting Business Value – What is your data worth? Data Management at Project Implementation - Is your data as clean as possible? Supply Chain Analysis and Optimization – Are you running a lean operation? Market Research Intelligence Services – What is the industry doing? White Paper Research and Intelligence – What information is important? Competitor and Industry Analysis – What are your competitors doing? Process Re-organization – Are your processes leaking valuable dollars? Powerpoint Summaries – Present with confidence and clarity. The information format that has been consolidated and reported in this document is Copyrighted. For publishing or usage rights please contact Frank Alfieri.
  22. 22. Second Generation Biofuel – Waste to Energy Prepared by Frank Alfieri July 20, 2013 Updated August 6, 2014 "Dynamic harmony between equitable availability of energy-intensive goods and services to all people and the preservation of the earth for future generations." And, "the solution will lie in finding sustainable energy sources and more efficient means of converting and utilizing energy." – Sustainable energy by J. W. Tester, et al., from MIT Press.

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