Projects grudge and bluebook reports 1 12 - nicap

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Project Bluebook (1949-1969) was the official U.S. Government investigation into UFOs that replaced Projects Grudge (1949-1951) and Sign (1947-1949). Headquartered at Wright-Patterson AFB, the investigations were handled by the U.S. Air Force. Without going into a lot of detail that would distract from the subject, there were thirteen reports prepared from the raw information gathered by those investigations. The reports were numbered 1-12 and 14.

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Projects grudge and bluebook reports 1 12 - nicap

  1. 1. NATIONAL lNVESTlGATlONS COMMITTEE ON AERIAL PHENOMENA UNITED STATES AIR FORCE PROJECTS GRUDGE and BLUEBOOK REPORTS 1 - 1 2 Published by THE NATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS COMMITTEE ON AERIAL P H E N O M E N A (NI CAP) WASHINGTON, D.C. 20036 19 68
  2. 2. Published by the National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena 11I 1 UNCLASSIFIED United States Air Force PROJECTS GRUDGE & BLUEBOOK REPORTS 1 - 12 (1951 1953) - li STATUS REPORTS hhD 1 ! SPECIAL REPORTS ; Published by - NATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS COMMITlEE ON AERIAL PHENOMENA I536 CONNECTICUT AVENUE* N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20036 June, 1968 1 I
  3. 3. TABIX OF CONTENTS Preface Foreword - , - -. C r o s s References secruity Name of Wart D a t e of Report Classification Project Grudge S t a t u s Report NO, 1 MOV, 30, 1951 Confidential P r o j e c t Grudge S p e c i a l Report NO, 1 Dec, 28, 1951 Confidential Project Grudge S t a t u s Report NO, 2 Dec, 31, 1951 Confidential Project Grudge S t a t u s Repart No, 3 Jan, 31, 1952 Confidential Project Grudge S t a t u s R e p a r t No, 4 Feb, 29, 1952 Secret P r o j e c t Blue Book S t a t u s Report No, 5 March 31, 1952 Secret P r o j e c t Blue Book S t a t u s Repart No. 6 April 30, 1952 Secret Project Blue Book S t a t u s Report NO, 7 M a y 31, 1952 Secret Project Blue Book S t a t u s Report NO, 8 Dec, 31, 1952 Confidential P r o j e c t Blue Book S t a t u s Report No, 9 Jan. 31, 1953 Oonfidential P r o j e c t Blue Book S t a t u s Report No, 1 0 Feb, 27, 1953 Secret P r o j e c t Blue Book S t a t u s Report NO, 11 M a y 31, 1953 Secret Project Blue Book S t a t u s Report NO, 12 Sept, 30, 1953 Secret
  4. 4. PREFACE Tfre official gcnrermrent agency charged with investigating and evaluating reports of slghtings of Unidentified Flying Objects has been, since July 1947, the United States Air Farce. The first code name far this investigation was -0ject Bign," which was s e t u p onIanuary 22, 1948. OnFebruary 11, 1949, it was renamed "Project Grudge.* A formal report byGrudge was written at the e d of that year (dated December 27, 1949), and the Air Force also issued, n on that dat0, a press release headlined "Project Saucer Mscontinuedn (Project "Saucer* wks the mame used far press purposes to designate both Sign and ~ r u d g e ) . This pl.ess release, widely published, allowed the public to believe that the A r Force, having explained m o s t UPO sightings to its m satisfaction, was i rro lung- intemmted in c d e d n g and evaluating reports, In actual fact, however, PrcspSct Grudge was s t i l l in operation, permitted to exist in a kind of limbo o f skeptidirim, As a result u s e ~ significant sightings in September 1951, f d huwe~mr, *new Grudge" was established the following month, and in March a E)52 the project received its third a d now familiar name, Proled Blue Book. R m September 1951 through September 1953 the project was headed by a CSaptain Edward J, Ruppt3.U. His well-known book, The Repurt on Unidentified ym Ublects* published in 1956, presents a great deal o impasrtarrt backi f graund information and r e c a n t s the history of some of the most' important immstlg~~ticms undertaken by Blue Beak during M s tenure, a period which i n & M the great UPO sighting wave o summer 1952, f Proan Nwember 1951 through September 1953 the project staff prepared Special -port and twelve *Status Repeats, * The Status Reports were gmitten at the end o each month, with a few time lapses, as shown in the f !hbla aaf Contents, The security classification af uConfMential" was given trr8 mpd NO, 1 a d Rp aN-• 1 8 2 83,868 Status RepcPts PO. 4 7 and 10- 12 were "Secret.' - Them s e s m s to h v been nio Report No, 13, but a lengthy document ae reEeased in 1955 was well-publidzed: "Froject Blue Book Report NO, 14. " This 315-page document, dated M a y 5 and relaased in Odober, had been prerparerd by an auts;lde arganizatlcm, under a n Air Pace contract with its own sodie- name, trojc~ct 'stork. It tabulated and analyzed the UPO sighting reports made daring the six-ye&~ period 1947 1952 WW been reparted to the had Air Facrtt. The report was an imposinq production, but even without its 240 tabltr8 it was far too laas to be studied and digested by newspapatmen , and the Farm issued a p m s s release that d e ~ c r i b d m r and emphasfied the the c t points that the Air Farce considered m o s t imp-t, Ulassified nFar Official -
  5. 5. Use Only, * R e p a r t No, 14 was available for &ew by press represantatives at various Air Farce Public I n f m a t l o n Offices, but wag not mallable to the public. In December 1956, however, a prlvate U r n researchen s u c m , through a n appeal to the Moss Uommittee (Gongressman John Moss, D, W. fornia) , in ob talning permission from the Air P a c e to reproduce the repart privately, at his own expense, and did so, omitting the 240 tables that were included in the origlnal . Even after No, 14 had been in circulation for some time, h w , othe repoets that preceded it were almost unknown, and inquiries abaut them met with little encouragement. Although t h e s e reports were officiafly beclasslfled in 1960, their availabfflw to the pubuc was not established until 1967. On January 25 of that year, Lt, Gal, G e m P, Preeman, Jr., ob the A h Force OW- of Infarmatian in Washington, wrote a M A staff member who wanted OP to exam* these repads, as f d l w s r "Spedal Reparts #1 through $13 (sic) can b e reviewed a Wright-Patterson Air Ermce Base, These reports a m admlnt istrative in nature and do not contain any technical infomatfoll. * late i n 1967, NICAP contacted the offlce of Ctongressman John Moss, head od the Foreign Opemtions and Government I n f a r m a t h Subccmmittee of the H u e as Committee on Government Operations. Knmn famiUar1y as the 'keeSm of Iirformatbn Committee, " this group has developed a reputation for fredng previously unavailable Government documents, including the a bow-mentioned Project Blue Book Report No, 14. In December 1967, the Moss Gammittee persuaded the Air P c to make Me a n additional set o Reports Nos 1 12 available at t h e Fentagon, in washington, f and t o permit dUpllcation o these reports in part--something the Ak Farce had f previously prohibited. Early in 1968 a MCAP staff member visited the Wflce of I i r f m a t i o n for the Secretary of the Air Faroe (SAPQI), inspected the reparts and subsequently made the arrangements b obtain the w p h s that are reprinted herein. . - These repcsts make it possible to study diractly, for the first t h e i n 15 years, the first-hand records of the Air Force investigations, their methods and conclusions. The reports, a s presented in this vdume, a m largely selfexplanatmy. Status Reports 1 through 7 each contain a mbulatFon of the casinvestigated during the period covered by the reporb appendices describing detafls of indtvldual cases; and usually a disuussion a the status o the project f f at the t i m e it was written. Reports 8 through 12, deallng with the many sighting repoets made during the summer wave o 1952 and after, abandon the tabulations f of cases because it was impractical to fry to hst them all, It will be noted that several cases a r e mentioned in moPe than orre report, In each fnstzmce, thirs la because there were significant changes or additions a data, including axmcted f dates . The arganizatlon of Reports 9 through 12 dlffers samewhat &cam that o f the earlier reports, in which summary cases were described in the appendices,
  6. 6. Some o t h e pages of t h e s e last f o u r repurts have been omitted in preparing this f version f o r reproduction. These contained only summary reports too hrlef o r inconclusive t o b of interest, or distribution list of t h e reports, It will also e be noted that a few pages of less-detailed reports have been combined far the purpose of saving space. Fur continuity , M m ' s page numbers h a v ~ been f added at the top o each page. Many of t h e cases described i n these reports are also discussed i n two other Impartant books: The UFO Evidence, published i n 1964 by NIOAP, and i n Ruppelt's book, previously mentioned, Since it was felt that readers might be interested In camparing the accounts of these cases i n the three different d e uments, a table fullows the Foreword which shows, for each case in the Blue Book r e p a t s , the pages i n the Evidence and in Ruppelt he paperback edition) c where the same case is discussed. In addition to sighting reports, many important organizational activities are discussed in these reptxts, and a cross-reference with RuppeltJs account provides a valuable insight into these various activltles , Project 'Twinkle, concerned with the unusual "green fireballs," is referred to i n Reports 4.5 and 6, and on pages 66-78 of Ruppelt, An unproductlve Air Force project designed to photograph UFOs, usspecial diffraction gratlng cameras, is described from its proposal t o ultlma te failure i n Reports 5 through 11; Ruppelt c w e r s this subject on pages 198 and 300. The famous Life article, "Have We Visitors Fram Space," by Robert Ginna and H, 13. Darrach, Jr. (Life, A p d 7, 1952) is referred ta in Reports 5 and 6, and by Ruppelt on pages 119 and 175-76. The highly publidzed press conference held by General John Bamford, W o w i n g the Washington, DOC, sightings late i n July, 1952, is covered In Keport No. 8, and by mppelt on page 132. One of the most interesting examples of early scientific Interest, the attempt by gwernment scientists to correlate radiation increases w i t h UFQ activity, is mentione$ in Report NO, 10, and by Ruppelt on pages 283-84. Dr. J, Allen Hynek's participation i n surveying a number af important astronomers on their views about UFOs is mentioned i n Report NO, 8, Other background meterial on this subject is mentioned by Ruppelt on pages 283-84. The significance of these reports surpasses the m e r e details of the sightings referred to, The reader wffl note the Air Force's frequent statement that UFO documents have not been withheld, when in fact every report was stamped either "3ecretn or "Gonfidential," and remained so farmthan 15 years, i n s p i t e o their declassiflcation i n 1960. The reader can also judge f r whether o not these reports a r e "adrninlstratlve in nature," as claimed by Galonel Freeman i n January, 1967. It is a l s o sMWng t o notice, i n the tables f accompanying Reports 1 through 7, the large number o sightirrg cases that remained "pending, or for which no further imrestiyation was made. It is interesting t o speculate where these many cases eventually wound up i n the Air Force1s statistical evaluations,
  7. 7. Early i n 1953, the Air Force, in conjunction with the CIA, convened a group of scientis ts , later referred t o as t e Roberts on Panel (after its chairman, h D . H, P. ~obertson), to review the U"PO situation, examine selected sighting r reparts, and recammend future procedure for Project Blue b k . A recently declassified version of the Robertson Panel ("sanitizedA by deleting the names of participating panel members) makes it clear that the primary recammendation by the panel was t o downgrade the status of Project Blue B w k and discourage public interest in the subject, claiming that UFO reparts were interfering with national security by crowding Government intelligence channels, It is not surprising, then, to note that the final Status Report is dated 3 0 September 1953, allowing sufficient time to put into effect this change in policy and abandoning projects such as the 8tatus Reports, During the twe-year period covered by these repwts, the scope and e f f e d v e n e s s af the Air Force investigation varied widely h m one extreme to feels that the reports themselves not only add to the general the other, hi,story of the subject, but provide illumination on the many public statements about the suhject that issued om the Air Force during that tlme.
  8. 8. FOREWORD Serious students of the UFO problem will, I feel sure, find this compilation of the 1951-53 Grudge and Bluebook reports one of the most significant and certainly one of the most fascinating of the recent additions to the UFO literature. NICAP and its staff are to be congratulated for putting this material into a form readily available to large numbers of readers; and the Moss Congressional Subcommittee is to be praised for assisting NICAP in extricating the reports from the Air Force files where they have lain inaccessible for so many years. When one studies the curious history of Air Force handling of the UFO problem, the twenty-four months from October, 1951 through September, 1353,emerge as a kind of "heroic period" of Air Force investigations, For increasing evidence points toward that period as the one interval during which UFOs were seriously and relatively vigorously investigated by the U, S, Air Force, the agency officially charged with UFO investigation responsibilities. Just before that period lay the "Dark Ages", as Ruppelt aptly labeled the 1949-51 era of Projects Sign and Grudge; and shortly after 1953 began a sort of new dark age when debunking and superficial investigations once again came to characterize Project Bluebook response to the UFO problem, As nearly as I can tell, the January, 1953, Robertson Panel Report marked the turning point with its regrettable decision to leave the UFO problem in the hands of a group not primarily concerned with scientific matters, and at the same time to have them shift to debunking policies to decrease public interest in the entire matter. It remains a very puzzling period, and an extremely important one in the history of UFO studies. It was the period during which Air Force UFO responsibilities were met primarily by one individual, Capt. Edward J. Ruppelt, an officer who might have brought the matter out into the full light of scientific scrutiny had his policies and viewpoints continued in force beyond 1953, They did not continue in force; after 1953 Bluebook went steadily downhill (viewed scientifically) and there evolved a steadily more adamant Air Force position that UFOs were only a nonsense problem. This would have caused no mischief if only the Air Force had made clear that it was really not doing qny-th&gresembling vigorous scientific investigation of UFOs from about 1954 to the present, Instead, Air Force press statements repeatedly misled the public and the scientific community by conveyulg a picture of Project Bluebook as a high-caliber scientific effort #'drawing upon the finest scientific talents and facilities available to the Air Force," As the net effect, the entire UFO question has been swept almost entirely under the rug, Only the efforts of groups like NICAP have prevented complete concealment of the facts about UFOs, But in the following pages, the reader can look back inside the closed doorq of the Air Technical Intelliqence Command(ATICL, and can get much more than a mere glimpse of what was actually transpiring back there in the heroic age. He will find in these reports the very real sense of 1952 puzzlement qnd concepn that Kqh.oe has wx2tte.n q-ut and that Ruppelt conveyed in U s 1956 hook. H en11 xaad fPterim pro& gress notes on many abortive efforts t b t Ruppelt and his supez2ora made over 15 years ago to try to secure improved UFO data. H e will find surprisingly pointed remarks about the effects of ridicule in
  9. 9. discouraging open reporting (e,g., Section I-F of Grudge Rept. 31, and surprisingly salty comments by the Bluebook astronomical consultant as he disparages the lack of basis for some of the negative 1g52 utterances of Menzel and Liddell. Most important of all (in my estimation), the reader will find in these once-secret pages, confirmation after confirmation of details of outstanding early cases previously known only through the writing of Keyhoe and Ruppelt. Speaking for myself, I have always been uncomfortable about taking seriously many of the reports in, say Ruppelt's 1956 book. It simply seemed unreasonable to think that the Air Force could have in its files so many strong cases, so many derived from military observers, without responding with the greatest vigor. From a study of the following reports, we now find that Ruppelt was evidently not inventing or embellishing at all: indeed, he probably understated the situation. Here one can find' Air Force documehtation of such outstanding cases as Elellefontaine, Port Huron, Nenana, Mitchel AFB, Patrick AFB, Rapid City, Ft, Monrnouth, and March AFB (to identify them merely by locale) and also cases the reader has probably never before heard of Ccqses at White Sands, at George AFB, at Moriarity, N M , .. at Craig, Montana, at Larson AFB, and many others). Yet even in that two-year period of most vigorous and most open-minded UFO investigaBias was present, (AS tion, the birds-and-balloons type of ~ l u e b o o k samples thereof, study the November 15, 1952, Wichita report in Rept. 9 or the December 10, 1952, Odessa report in Rept. 10.) In support of my assertion that these declassified Reports suggest that Ruppeltws book is really an understatement of the seriousness of the UFO problem, I might invite attention to such cases as the following h o n e of which Ruppelt reported in his book): 1) Larson AFB, January 8, 1953 CRept. lo), where an Unknown "green disc-shaped object" was viewed by some sixty military and civilian witnesses over a period of about 15 minutes. 2) George AFB, May 1-20, 1952 (Rept. 7) where a series of very curious reports from base military personnel led to no adequate explanations. Ruppelt merely mentions in his book that he had gone to George AFB to check these cases; their actual content is seen to be most intriguing--and perhaps less balloon-like than some of ~lueboopscomments would indicate. 31 Colorado Springs, December 4, 1952 (Rept. 10) where a military and civilian observer reported a midday sighting of a fast-moving round object of metallic luster which executed several right-angle turns with no speed decreases (tagged "possible aircraft'' in the style that ultimately became so wellingrained within the Bluebook office). 4) Odessa, Washington, December 10, 1953 (Rept. 10) where an F-94 had radar and visual contact for 15 minutes with a reddish-white object "larger than any known aircraftm that sometimes hovered, sometimes reversed direction, but eluded a 600-mph jet for a quarter of an hour--a neat trick for the research balloon it is asserted to have been. 5) And, to close a list that could become quite long,see Rept. 10's brief but intriguing summary of an Unknown, seen by three "mature, reliable8' persons at a distance of a few hundred yards and 10-15 feet above terrain. The report mentions its biconvex shape, like "two soup bowls put togetherw, and refers to lighted windows or portholes. It's this kind of puzzling case, and others cited above, here made available as part of the open record,that make this NICAP publication an outstanding contribution to the UFO literature. James E McDonald, Professor . university of Arizona
  10. 10. discouraging open reporting (e.g., Section I-F of Grudge Rept. 31, and surprisingly salty comments by the Bluebook astronomical consultant a$ he disparages the lack of basis for same off the negatlve 1952 utterances of Menzel and Liddell. Most important of all (in my estimation), the reader will find in these once-secret pages, confirmation after confirmation of details of outstanding early cases previously known only through the writing of Keyhoe and Ruppelt. Speaking for myself, I have always been uncomfortable about taking seriously many of the reports in, say Ruppelt's 1956 book. It simply seemed unreasonable to think that the Air Force could have in its files so many strong cases, so many derived from military observers, without responding with the greatest vigor. From a study of the following reports, we now find that Ruppelt was evidently not inventing or embellishing at all: indeed, he probably understated the situation. Here one can find' Air Force documentation of such outstanding cases as Bellefontaine, Port Huron, Nenana, Mitchel AFB, Patrick AFB, Rapid City, Ft. Monmouth, and March AFB (to identify them merely by locale) and also cases the reader has probably never before heard of (cases at White Sands, at George AFB, at Moriarity, N M , .. at Craig, Montana, at Larson AFB, and many others). Yet even in that two-year period of most vigorous and most open-minded UFO investiga(AS tion, the birds-and-balloons type of Bluebook bias was present. samples thereof, study the November 15, 1952, Wichita report in Rept. 9 or the December 10, 1952, Odessa report in Rept. 10.) - In support of my assertion that these declassified Reports suggest that Ruppelt's book is really an understatement of the seriousness of the UFO problem, I might invite attention to such cases as the following (none of which Ruppelt reported in his book]: 1) Larson AFB, January 8, 1953 CRept. lo), where an Unknown "green disc-shaped object" was viewed by some sixty military and civilian witnesses over a period of about 15 minutes. 21 George AFB, May 1-20, 1952 (Rept. 7) where a series of very curious reports from base military personnel led to no adequate explanations. Ruppelt merely mentions in his book that he had gone to George AFB to check these cases; their actual content is seen to be most intriguing--and perhaps less balloon-like than some of ~luebookkcomments would indicate. 31 Colorado Springs, December 4, 1952 CRept. 101 where a military and civilian observer reported a midday sighting of a fast-moving round object of metallic luster which executed several right-angle turns with no speed decreases (tagged "possible aircraftgwin the style that ultimately became so wellingrained within the Bluebook office]. 4) Odessa, Washington, December 10, 1953 (Rept. 10) where an F-94 had radar and visual contact for 15 minutes with a reddish-white object "larger than any known aircraft" that sometimes hovered, sometimes reversed direction, but eluded a 600-mph jet for a quarter of an hour--a neat trick for the research 5) And, to close a list that balloon it is asserted to have been. could become quite long,see Rept. 10's brief but intriguing summary of an Unknown, seen by three "mature, reliablew persons at a distance of a few hundred yards and 10-15 feet above terrain. The report mentions its biconvex shape, like "two soup bowls put togethern, and refers to lighted windows or portholes. It's this kind of puzzling case, and others cited above, here made available as part of the open record,that make this NICAP publication an outstanding contribution to the UFO literature. James E McDonald, Professor . University of Arizona I I 1
  11. 11. CROSS REFERENCES Report Number Date Place ReportNa.1 8/25/51 8/25/5 1 8;/2 6/5 1 8/31/51 9/10-11/51 9/23/5 1 10/9/5 1 10/9/5 1 1 01 5 1 Lubbock,Texas Albuquerque, N. M e Iarson AFB, Wash. Matador,Texas Fort Monmouth, N. J. March AFB, Calif. Terre Haute, Ind, Paris, Ill. Minneapolis, Minn Evidence page . Sp. Repoat Noel 9/10-11/51 Fort Monmouth, N.J. ReportNo.2 8/25/51 8/2 5/5 1 8/31/51 9/23/51 10/9/51 1~/9/51 1 01 5 1 Lubbock,Texas Albuquerque, N .Me Matador,Texas AAarchAPB, Calif. Terre Haute, h d . Paris, Ill. Minneapolis, Minn. Report No. 3 1/22/52 1/29/52 Mitchell AFB, N.Y. Wonsan, Korea RepoPrtNo.4 1/21/52 1/29/5 2 MitchellAFB,N.Y. Wonsan, Korea Report No. 5 1/20/52 Fairchild AFB, Wash. Report No. 7 5/7/52 5/8/52 1/22/52 R o de Janiero, Brazil L Atlantic Ocean Nenana, Alaska Ruppelt page
  12. 12. CROSS REFERENCES Evfdence page Report Number Date Place Report Wo. 8 7/18/52 7/2 9/5 2 7/2 9/5 2 7/29/52 8/1/52 Patrick AFB, Fla Port Huron, Mich. LOS Alamos, N.M. Albuquerque, NoM. Bellebntai ne , Ohio . Haneda AFB, Japan Report No. 9 W w Report No. 10 12/10/52 1 2 6/5 3 / O d e s s a , Wash. Continental Divide, New Mexico Report No. 11 3/3/53 Luke AFB, Ariz Panama Canal Zone . Rapid City, SOD,
  13. 13. cancelled C&s%&km AUTH: ~ O S C U V J. bte L7 4 Facehja, Y€#2-/$go sTIm fu%PmT N . 1 O Classification cancelled AIR ! E C W I C b L INTELLIG?33C,P CENTER UREm-PAlTERSON AIR FORCE BASE . ~ l u T O N , OHIO . M 4 ~ a t USAF
  14. 14. UNCLASSIFIED This report i s tbe first of a series of m n t h l y a t a t u s reports of R a j e c t Cmdge. Each report w i l l be w i t t e n on or il near the last day o f the month and vl contain a Ust of all incidents reported during the month covered by the report. The reports that are considered tLo be outstanding will a l a o be sumariaed in t h e a?xndices of the report so that more d e t a i l e can be presented, 'ihe overell status of the project w l also be presented. ll UNCLASSIFIED
  15. 15. I Overall , Status Much of the vorkdone on Project Grudge has been dsvotod to the reorganization of t h e p r o j e c t as @en i n the h-aject I n i t i a t i o n Fom 1-3, dated 22 October 1951. The old Project Cruc?ge and R > e c t S i p f i l e s have been reviewed j and sorted, Cross-indexing and tabulation of the old f i l e s has been slov due to a l a c k of c l e r i c a l hel?, but it i s hoped that this s i t u a t i o n uill be rrlleviatcd in t h e near future, I t i s contemplated t h a t all of t h e sightinps of unconventional fl3objecta vill soon be cross-indexed a c a o r d l q t size, color, location, etc,, so that as nuch s t a t i s t i c a l data o se possible vill be available. It is bclieved t h a t i t nay be possible to deternine several general c b r a c t e r l s t i c s of the s i g h t b g s from t h e mass of d a t a that is on file a t ATIC. Con~cts have been established 1~3th all agencies t h a t may bo able to assist i n h j e c t Grudge sue?! as hir Keather Senrice, Flight Service, hieh a l t i t u d e balloon projects, O . S . I . , e t c , There i s e t i l l some doubt as to the channels t h a t s h o d d be used in contacting some agencies but these vl be c l a r i f i e d in the near Future, il Tvo m j o r d i f f i c u l t i e ' s hnve a r i s e n and they are (1) the time e l e m n t . and (2) obtaining t r a n s w r t a t i o n , In regard to the time element, it has been found that i n nany Instances one o r tuo mbnths w i l l ela?se.before ATIC receives vord on an incident, It i s very possible that nany incidents a r e never reported, As far as can be dete-ed, t h i s i s due to two main reasons : to the procedures and r e s p n s i b i l i t i e s in re-. a, Letters pertporting incidents weredated Se?k=ber 19%- Since t h a t t h e there has been an influx o f new and r e a d l e d o f f i c e r s and changes in personnel; consequently, a rea at nmber of people are not aware of the requirements of F'rojeut Grudge, Xncidents t h a t are several months old are finally received a t ATIC aftRr having fcuwarded through several commands, in sone instances i s b , It i s beZieved that the general feelt h a t the Air Force i s n o t too interested i n thls project and reporting m c incidents is Iminportant, It ie the opinion of ATIC that regardless uh of personal b e l i e f s as to the o r i g i n of the objects, the t a s k of determ h h g , i f possible, vhat these objeots are has been assifled, and should be carried out, I t ia b e l l w e d t h a t the revision and re-circulation of the AP l e t t e r perteldng t A.oject Gmdge v i l l a l l e v i a t e the problem of delay in reo ceiving reports. The Collection Division, M r e c b r a t e of Intslllgence uas requested to r e v i s e and re-circulate this l e t t e r on 25 October 1951, , UNCLASSIWED
  16. 16. If, after the above mentioned l e t t e r i s circulated, t h e s i t u a t i o n does n o t improve, it may be &isable to c i r c u l a t e another menorandurn explaining why the A i r Force i s i n t e r e s t e d in this problem and how rep o r t s a r e to be made. The second major d i f f i c u l t y onaauntered has been t r c x l s p r h t i o n Ln x t h e l o c a l i t y of the incidents. 0 1aany occosions, the i n t e r r o ~ a t i o nof one source w i l l lead to o t h e r sources. All of these ' l e a d s l ' m s t be followed to g e t a conpletR picture. This n e c e s s i t a t e s a g r e a t deal of t r a v e l u i t h i n . a c i t y o r even over p a r t of a state. A t t i n e s governnent transportetion i s available b u t a t o t h e r tines the incidents a r e not close fn r d L 1 t a - y establishments o r i f they oro, all t r a n s p o r t a t i o n nay be in use. Since i t is the policy n o t +o reinbUrse t r a v e l e r s f o r such, t taxi fares; E l i s has imposed a p e a t f i n a n c i a l burclen on the i n v e s t i ~ a t o r , In regarc? to the 6 2 ~ x 3subject, the t i n e element again e n t e r s since t h e r e is usually only a limited mount of time t h a t can be spent on an investigation and a l l the t i n e spent attemptinp to g e t transportation o r findlcg the c o r r e c t bus routes i s l o s t . Stspa have been taken to overcome this second major d i f f i c u l t y by requesting t h a t Headquarters USAF send a wire t o the n i l i k j i n s t a l l a t i o n to which a v i s i t t n l l be made requesting t h a t the Canmanding Officer give rull cooperation to Prpject Crudge personnel. Another problem t h a t has n o t been f u l l y investigated i s whether o r n o t wide apread p u b l i c i t y to the p r o j e c t should be given in an attempt to obtain a more coaplets coverape of incidents. It i s b e l i w e d t h a t nore r e p o r t s would be obtained b u t the m b l i c i t y would also ?roduce a mass of "crank" l e t t e r s t h a t would increase t h e workload a considerable amount, It has been t e n t a t i v e l y decided t h a t the b e s t course of a c t i o n is t o v e i t and see what improvenents are b r o u ~ h t about by the revised AF l e t t e r s being r e - c i r d a t e d by tho Collection Givision of D/I. b m r t s of Snecific Inaidents The inclosed l i s t i s a sdmmry of all incidents t h a t have been reported o r were being investigated d w i n e the pcriod 22 October 1951 t o 3 November 1951, Several of the incidents are considered too d e t a i l e d to surmnarize in t h e l i s t eo they are carried aver and stm~aarizedin t h e appendices. I the future, the l i s t w i l l c o n s i s t of two parts: (1) h c i d e n t a n reported d u r i n g the period covered by the report, and (2) incidents from the p a s t period t h a t are s t i l l in t h e process of be* investipated o r incidents that are pendinp during the previous month and are now closed, h e to the huge task of investigating all reported incidents, it will be the policy of Project Grudge ta concentrate on thaee i n c i d e n t s that appear to have orieinated from hiph grade sources, m c h aa pilots, t e a h n i c a l l y trained people, e t c . The only exception to this w i l l be where a number of sightinge occur in a c e r t a i n area a* about t h e a m t i n e , A l l r e w r t e , however, w l l l be incorporated in the file f o r etatistical purposes,
  17. 17. In the evaluation o f reported radar s l g h t i q s , the t l e c t r o n i c s Section of ATIC has been consulte8. The majority of the radar s k h L i n e s a m very d i f f i c u l t to evaluate due to the p o s s i b i l i t y of phenomena caused by wather or in the electronic cfrcuits of the set. About all that can be concluded on these siehtinqs i s the weather was or w a s not conduaive to pronotiry! phenanena b v n to be caused by certain weather conditione. In certain instances special detailed re?orts dll bo vritten on tho conclusions of the investigations o f s i g h t i q s . These v i U be in e o q l i a n c e vith requeeta f r o m higher headquarters for such reports, The eonclueions of all other incidents w i l l be concluded in the statue report,
  18. 18. c 2 393 2 E""i: 0 + '7; + a : d ,e rl Z " 3 C ;P 2 : 3 +I " C O " * g 5 i3sa$ 2.- " C 0 0 ~ %0 s i j o n 4 . l s e ; : : LO PO^ 5 2 :; 2" : c 5 g s Y O S 6 . .- ... . . __ e ee: : t J 0 5 " 4 :'a s f 6 : 2 3 -r ;;. ~23; Hi g: rcaen r s 5* $ 5 _ .. 4e5 .- ............. .-. 5 . . . . . ( I - .-..-- - --A . ..... a u z D W P G I ) . a a C C m 6 a I) -7 0 4 : 5 % u 4 - 8. :z 9u e& a 4 Y a - < t L C k C ...- .... . . . .. S ; 3 V) ! . . . v- . -. -.. . . . . . . . . - .....-.. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  19. 19. " I .g - C c 11 u C G m 28 4 E 3 e Es CI -3 yS 3C b es 8X Z 4s' X 46. : g i j ; j zE - 2 C q g , 4 3 - CI 3 < T 8 =H' ; $:
  20. 20. UNCLASSIFIED Aouendix I The f i r s t of a s e r i e s of siphtizqes r e l a t e d t o t h i s incident occurred the evening of 25 icu,opat 1931 a t a ~ p r o x i m a t e l y 2ll0 CST. Four Texas Techn i c a l Collega professors -re s i t t i n g In the bn0lcyeu-d of ono of the p r o f e s e o r @ s homes observing meteorites i n eonjunction with a study of nicrometeorites being c a r r i e d o u t h the aolloge. A t 2110 they observe2 a group of l i g h t s pass over; heed f'rom II to S . The l i g h t s had about the sane i n t e n s i t y as a b r i g h t atar b u t were l a r g e r i n area. The a l t i t u d e was not determined b u t they traveled a t a high ratR of speed, The p a t t e r n of the l i g h t s w a s slmost a p e r f e o t senic i r a l e containing from 20 t o 30 individual l i g h t s . Later in the wenlng e a W a r b c i d e n t was obaemed and durirq! a period of about three weeks a total of a p p r c n h t e l y twelve (12) such f l i g h t 8 were o b s e r ~ e d those msn, by The p u p o f men includedr a. b, a d, The Head of the Petroleum EneFneering Lhpartmsnt Pkofeesor of Geolow, has Ph.D. R o f e s s o r of Physics, has P . , hD h f e e s o r of Chemicql i h e i n e e r l q , baa &D .. Beeidee t h e abme four men the following have observed t h e incidents: a, b, Professor of Mathematics, has Ph,D. hi. Graduate student working on P . ; I n addition, a Rofessor of Astronomy was consulted on the incident, b u t he did not o b s s n e any of these f l i g h t s . The above nentioned men took a personal I n t e r e s t IXAe phenomena aRci th undertook a study of t h e objects. Attempts vere d e to obtain an a l t i t u d e mea~urenent la* by o u t a measured base l i n e p o ~ n d i c u l a rto the usual f l i g h t path of the o b j e c t end placing angle me as win^ d w i c e s a t the end of the base m e , however, all t h e i r a t t e q t s f a i l e d beoauso the objeota did n o t appear on the nights t h e observers vere w a i t i n g f o r them, From the s e r i e s of observations, the following facts were o'btained: v e l o c i t y of t h o o b j e c t was very nearly 300 of arc p e r a. The @a tr b, There was no soupd t h a t bould be attributed to the object, c, The f l i g h t patb of the o b j e c t was hLom H to S I n the majority of tbe f l i g h t s , d, mare vere tuo o r three f l i c h t s per e~enin&, e, The period between f l k h t s was about one hour md 10 d m t e s . eecand ,
  21. 21. UNCLASSIFIED f . The color of t h e l i g h t s uas blue-white. g. Thore vere h.on h. Tho f i r s t two fliphts obeerved vere a s e n i - c i r c l e of l i c h t c b u t I n subsequent f l i g h t s t h e r e w a s no orderly a r r q e n e n t , 1 . The o b j e c t alvays a p ~ a r e : ! a t an t c x l o of i n +he north and disa?peared a t about &I0 did n o t v a d u a l l y cone i n t 3 v i e u es w o d d f r o m a distance, n e i t h e r did it eradrtallr f. There vos no apparent chenee i n s i z e as tke o h j e c t passed overhead. X) t o 30 se?crate l i ( r h t s i n each fornation. about 50' k o n h o r i z o n t a i i n t h e south. I'he o b j e c t an a i r c r a f t approaching disa?par. Attempts vere n! ae + o b b i n the r d a t i v e h e i p h t of t h e o b j e c t in r e o p o t a Hovever, these a t t c q t s uere a l s o u n s u c c e s ~ due t the f a c t t h a t a to aloude. the objecta passed between v i d e l y s c a t t e r e d clouds. E f f o r t s to d c t e n d n c whether o r not t h e r e :[as any form between t h e l i ~ h t s This a l s o wa3 unsuccess- by t m b sce s t z r s bekeen the l i g h t s were made. r g f'ul due t the s h o r t time t h e o b j e c t was in view. a This phenomena w a s observed by a t l e a s t one hundred people i n and around Lubbock, Texas. Sosle of these people uere of the opinion t h a t t h e o b j e c t s vere birds. On the evening of 31 Au,pat 19%, a t about 23- CST, a college freshman i r o n Texas Tech observed t h r e e f l i r h t s of the o b j e c t and allegedly obtained t f i v e photographe. H e obtained two photos of one f l i ~ h and three of another. These photos ehov single r o w of l i g h t I V-formtion on two ?hotos and a n double rov on the others. His d e s c r i p t i o n of the o b j e c t is much t h e same as that of t h e college professors, except t h a t ths aolleqe professors never o b s e m e d a p e r f e c t V-formation. (See Appendix I1 and V f o r poesibly r e l a t e d incidents.) status of t h e k e s t i p a t i o n P r o j e c t Grudge personnel mde a t r i p ta Lubbocky Teaas, on &9 November 19s t o o b t a i n more d e t n i l s on the. inci2ent. M n source8 who had seen the a7 o b j e c t o r who were involved i n the sightinf: were i n t e r r o ~ s t e ~ A conference . was held with t h e college professors and they offered to write a d e t a i l e d acaaunt of their obeematione and forvard it to ATIC. This r e p o r t should be forthcoming. The photagra?her who c h i n s ta have ?hotoma?hed the o b j e c t ua8 lnbrr~Every e f f o r t was M e t o f l n d a flaw i n the photoqrapherle account of gated. the inoident b u t the r e d t a vere negative. The college professors d i d n o t believe the photograahs were authentia as they had never obsemed a 9-ahaped groun o f l i g h t s . They were n o t s u m , howvery w>eth.;r or n o t t h e y had o b s e n e d t h e same objocts that were photopaohed. Since t h e I n t e r n g a t i o n , two
  22. 22. dieurepenciee i n the photoe have been found and the p h o t o p a p h e r Is being relnterro~ated by the 0.S.f. One school of t h o w h t of the peoyle i n the Lubbock area i s t k a t the o b j e c t s were aone t;-pe of mi,-rat4r7 b i r d s r o f l e c t i n q l i p h t f r o m t h e c i t y . Several people reported thu3 they d e f i n i t e l y knew t h e o b j e c t r were ducks because they could s e e dws fla??inc, It is very ?oas'ible t h a t sone of t h e peo~lo vho were looking f o r t h e o b j e c t d i d see ducks as them wero ?uck f l i g h t e p a s e i w over during t h e ~ c r i o d . It i c s i g n i f i c a n t t h a t those p o o d e who sow ducks were d e f i n i t e l y a b l e to i 6 e n t i f y t h s o b j e c t s ti^ ducics, o r some t p e of b i r d , becar:se they could sco the winqs o r heard then & . c a miso, however, o t h e r 9eople were j u s t as d e t e r a b e d t h a t they were n o t birds. The posslblu conclusion i s t h a t same peor>le did see b i r d s , b u t o t h e r s saw sone other objects. The collcge' profeesors do n o t b e l i c v e t h e theory t h a t t h e o b j e c t s were birds, but they are givinz the p o s s i b i l i t y nore thou~yht. If they were b i r d s , they vould have to be r e l a t i v e l y low fa r i v e t h e i l l u s i o n of hich s?eed. An oacasional f l i e h t of b i r d s might pass low over a c i t y on a c l e a r n i p h t b u t it ie highly d o u b t f u l i f they vould continue to do this f o r s e v e r a l n i e h t s . M i gratory b i r d s u s u a l l y try t o keep away from c i t i e s . !he Federal l.!ild Life Game Ufirden w a v i s i t e d and althouph he vas n o t familiar with t h e i n c i d e n t he doubtsd i f t h e objecta vere birds, H e stated t h a t they could have been, however. Th6 n o s t l i k e l y suspect, i f it i s a bird, i s a member o f the P l w e r family which has a pure w h i t e b r e a s t , b u t unless t h e r e vas a sudden influx of t h e birch into the Lubbock area, the game warden doubted i f t h e r e would be enoueh of these b i r d s to nake up as mmy f l i r h t a as vere observed, If the photos aro authentic, the objecta very probcibly aro n o t ducka because an e x ~ c r i e n c e dphotogranher f r o n the Lubbock Avalanche Newspaper attempted to g e t photo8 o f ducks wiri;e both n a t u r a l l Q h t and flash, but failed. The i n v e e t l g a t i o n o f this i n c i d e n t i s contintdnp. It i s probably the moat unique i n c i d e n t in the history of P r o j e c t Grudge i n t h a t it was observed so many times by a s c i e n t i f i c a l l y t r a i n e d group of obserpers, These people are oontinuing to a t t e p t 4 a r r i v e a t a s o l u t i o n f o r the phenomena, They had a previously l o s t i n t e r e s t after swerd weeks of obsenrctions bectluse they believed that the o b j e c t was eome new Ar Foroe a i r c r a f t or.miseile. i The phobgraphe are now a t .the P h o t o p a p h i e Reconnaissanae laborabry at Urkht Air ilePelopment C e n a r for snalyeis.
  23. 23. ALBUQUERQUE, E : ! MnrICO - 25 A U . W S ~ 1951 On the wenin& of 25 Auqust 1951, a t a 5 8 K T , a Sanciia Ease Security Guard and his wife obsemed what they described to be a flying wing t p a i r c r a f t scmilar to t h e fiorthro:, Fly W i q Ibrsbcr (B-~9) pass over t h o bzckyard of t h e i r trailer honc Fn the enst p a r t of Albuq~er~uc.Thoy j u d p d the win? span of the aircraft to be about one and one half times the viw soan of ci E-36, with which they vere fa~ili6-r. The object wns flying low, the a l t i t u d e was thought Q be -about 800 f t . 1000 f . armd tiiere was no sound t, t h a t could be attributed to the object. 3~ color of the ~ b j e c was not t - apparent due to the t w i l i c h t but dark chordwise s t r i p e were noticed under tho uisqs. Six to eight pairs of s o f t plowinc l i g h t s uero noticcd on the t r a i l i n g edge of the wing. The s p e d was judged to be about 300 4 . mph C B and the object t on a heading of opproxhmtely 1 6 0 ~ . w - (See Appondix I f o r possible related incident.) Broken olouda a t 17,000 f t . , v i e i b i l i t y f i v e miles, wind S a t 5 nph. The p o s s i b i l i t y of this being rr b o r n a l r a r a f t vas checkcd w i t h negative The AC and W Radar Station a t Kirtland U B d i d not observe any unueual or unidentified -craft. results. The p a r d ' s background was checked and since he has a it bas bccn a s m d t h s t he i s mentally atable. nQfl clearance, The photos taken of the V-shaped object a t hbbock, T~xu, (see bpendix They were ahoun to t h e sources by the O.S.I. and oources stated that arranpncnt of llehts' on the object they eaw vae similar They sketched in t h e wing as they saw it. %o thc photo. I) were s e n t b Albuquerque. An irmeatlgation w a s made to determine whether o r m t any one else had aeon the object but only negative results were obtained. Purther evaluation of this incident depends on fh;, outamme of attempts t h e autbentieity of the Iubbock photos. to establish
  24. 24. A?-endix UNCLASSIEIEQ 111 On 26 Aumst 1951 a t 0836 YST, an ur.il!entiffcd f l y i n ? o b j e c t was detected by an AN/cPS-4 and A?l/cPS-l rdar sets. The o b j e c t uae trackod cantinua:~sly f o r a period of six ninutes end nade a t-d c o u n d speed of 9% rn-h. The objeotwas on a oouroe o f 21p3 w i t h only slirht deviations enroute. An a l t i t u d e read* of 12,000 f e e t w s obtainec? b u t t h e accureay of t h e noeauremnt i s questionable due t o brief length of the t h e o b j e c t w ~ s detected. The F-86 a i r c r a f t uere s c r a ~ b l e d but rdar c a n t s c t wit,& the o b j e c t was l o s t before t h e aircraft vero airborne, A visual search was conduc+Yed f r o m 1 , 0 to 2 5 , W f e e t with nogative results. 700 The o?erator of the rt;dar s e t , an Air Forca Ca?tain, i s considered to be an export operator. 'ieathor conditions a t the tine of s i g h t i n g were n o t favorable f o r anmalous rdcrovave proracation. S t a t u s of f m e s t i p a t i o n Review of t h l s i n c i d e n t by the Zl.ectronlcs Section of ATIC aoncludea t h a t t h o return vas possibly due to i n t e r f e r e n c e , This was concluded bec&se of the a ? v n t path of the object, directly approaching t h e station, and the fact tbat the target w a s observed on only the low bean of the P N / c P s ~ radsr eet,
  25. 25. UNCLASSIFIED. Ir~6endix The only i n f o r r ~ l t i o navailable on this incident Is a newspaper articlo i r o n "Vandelfa leader" of 30 August 199. "It wasa't a f w saucer ! k r wr.s It a conventional type airplane ! l g But vhatevcr it was, it has sZpusd t h e c u r i o s i t y of a t l e a s t f i v e persons who sav it mering throuyh the air Fbndajr night. *'It was a big oranFo l i c h t v i t h blin5ing I n t e n s i t y uhen I f i r s t noticed it wer the southvest corner of the a i r p o r t , ' %y 2illians t o l d the Isader. 11 had j u s t taxied out onto the runuay preparing to take a flight around the I c a l l e d over c i t y when -I noticed the U g h t , It was between 8 and 8 : 30 p.m. the redio to the CAA o f f i c i a l on dutx Albert Lraoklec, and ta Paul Recse and aakc3 then t W e a look. ' a "'The Ugh-ad object disappeared 5h the v e s t and we decided maybe n there was nothing to it. So I decided to continue wlth my f l i e h t plans,' r : i l l i m s statel. ' w'ShortJy aftor I hEd taken off I noticed the l i g h t again, approaching my plane. It c m e Zirectly at ne and then c i r c l e d tzy plane tulce before headtouard Croewllle, I followod it and i t m d e a c i r c l e rotind t h a t town and cane back tawarc? Vandnlia. I l a s t saw it nsar the country d u b . The CAA radioed a transport p i l o t who was passing over Vaado3la a t the tine a t about 20,000 f e e t and he too saw the object? "'It was all very a w e , the Vmdalia aJ;nan said. 'It wasnt t an airplane but whatever it was tho l i g h t was on the tail of it, and there vas a cmaU. r e d l i g h t on top, h b a w i t was some military craft m Scott F i e l d m k i n g a t e e t run,' The U g h M objeot vhich appeared-to have a 10 to 12 iqch lens, was also seen by bight Kerns in St, E'lmn the s s ~ s wonincr,m Status of Investimitiaq An atferrpt wl be made il to obtain further infornation on thfq incident,
  26. 26. On 31 August 1951 a t aproxbmtely 1245 CST two ladies vero 6rivine in an antarnbile several d l e s n o r t h of :.(atador, Texas. The object was deecribed aa a pear-shaped object, a l a u m o r s i l v e r i color, which readily n reflected the sunlight, The object had a p o r t or s o w t p e of aperture in the side, It mved through thc air wi-A the snail end forward, They ju8god the s i z e bc about t h a t of a &29 fuselage, 'herc M S ~3 sign of any B X ~ b u s t and no noise was heard. A s t h o two ladicrr uore driving north from >latador, Texas, the driver of the automobile first noticed thc objoct about 1 yards a??eadof the . 3 autamobile. They stopped and both ladies got out to observe the object, It w a a d r i f t i n g elowly in an eastward dircc+,ion a t a $ x e d the;/ judged t o be "less than tho speed required to 'take off in a cub a i r c r a f t " and an a l t i t u d e of about 120 it. Seconda l a t e r t h e object began to ascent rapiZ1y and in a feu seconds it mved out of s l e h t t o the e a s t i n a circular ascent. (The wind a t a t about 5-7 knots,) this time was fron the A background i m e o t i ~ a t i o n shove? that both uomn were of exeellent' aharacbr , This incident is of i n t e r e s t because it uae observed 4uring the seme -period OB Weather tho objects mer Lubbock, texas, (see Appendix I ) , - - a , 1230 CST Reese PiFB 31 August 1951 lhtinnted ceiling 6,000 ft,,. broken cloado, with t h i n scat*& clouds a t 25,000 ft, V i s i b i l i t y 15 miles. Bind EF!E a t 3 knots, b , 1 2 3 CST Childresr, Texas 31 $ g u s t 1951 Estimated ceiling 25,000 f t , , overcast, Vieibility 15 nfles, Vind ITHE a t 7 knots. T o u e r h g o ~ uclouds in SE quadrant, s - - Status of Investipn tion It has becn reported t h a t a road repair crew sew the sene object later on t h e stme day. Atbnpts wl be mde to conte.ct members of t h i s & crew il and obtain their statements, There were a l s o reports of crop dust* activity $n the arca, so nttenpt3 vill b onCe t determine whether or not the ladiee e o oauld have seen U s a c t i v i t y ,
  27. 27. O n 10 and 1 September 1951, a s e r i e s of incidents occurred i n the area 1 of Fort Monwuth, P J. An i n i t i a l e i g h t i q of an unidentified o b j e c t was . made on a radar set. Soon a f t e r tho radar s i ~ h t i w ,two Air Force o f f i o e r e in a 7-33 a i r o r a f t uneuccessrully attsclpted to intoroept e unidentified n object. Later several more radar sightlngs were reported. S t a t u s of h e s t i ~ a t i o n A connlete investigation of t h i a incident was carriod out and will bo r e p o r k d in ?reject Grudge Soecial Report No. 1, It has been t e n t a t i v e l y detcrnined that the T-33 p i l o t s probabb observed a balloon t h a t had been launched a feu minu'ks. prior h t h e i r arrival i n the area. T o of the radar w sightinps w e r e returns * ~ r n balloons and the others w e r e probably due to w e a t h e r phenomena and excitement of the student operators due to p r w i o u s s i g h ~ s . Only one radar return cannot be explained. The operator who obaemod t h i s incident assumed t h e o b j e c t was traveling over 700 xph becauoe the radar s o t ' s automatic troakbg would not f o l l o v the target. L t ie poesible that the i n a b i l i t y to trgck,the o b j e a t vat3 due to hie a b i l i t y to proprly operate the s e t under msntal atress,
  28. 28. UNCLASSIFIED O 23 Smte!lbcr 1951 a t 0410 PST, an uriidentiflod object was ~ i ~ l l t e d n over SAW %sch, California. .Four F-Z6 aircraft mrc scrar~bleda d t,!e o b j e c t uca s i q h t e d by then ovor l.kwoc, Californis. On atkdning an sltitude of 43,000 ft. the F-36's r o ~ r t e d thz object to be orbitting ?larch irR3 at an e s t i m t c d altitude of betrrccn 50,000 ft. a 55,000 ft. The objuct appeared d to be a swept win€, f i ~ h type aircroft. ~ r Ra5iosonde balloons were release3 f m Snn Diego, Long Beach an! S a n t a Y llsria, Cdlfornia a t a p ? r o ~ ~ t e 0700 PST. A l l of these weather statiana ly were checked by OSX prsonnel and a l t h o ~ ~ h Snlloons uoro rclcased all the uaclther stntion ~crsonnelsteted that i t would be very douktful i f t h e i r . balloons wxiL3 have traveled thB course that the object traveled. All o f the =jar aircraft factories and installations conducting e x ; pcrimntal f l i g h t testa were contacted. P experinental aircraft airborne i o at the t . of the sigh-. i= Additional in??omation 'hag.been requested as to additional details of the incident such as t i n e s and locations during the attempted interception by tbe F-868~1rmd other w s s i b l e balloon launchings.
  29. 29. On 9 October 1951 ~ .23 1' t CST, a CAA Chief Aircraft C o d a t o r obsexved a silver object pass directly overbead vi.-e ho vaa at I f A m n I M c i p d A i r port, five nilee east o f T e r n Fas:e , L?Zinna. The object vas judged to be approxima-ly the saiae size as a 50 cent gieco held a t lengtn, The object paseed overhead at a very hieh r a b of s p e d going in a southess'~er1y direction, passing From d i r e c t l y overhead to the horizon i about15 secorpdr, Thore vas n no sound or vapor tFxLl-8. The shape and general form of the object could be eeen as the object paased w e r the horizon and out of sight. (For related incident, ase A p wx fX,) p e i Clear, bright sun, ao c l o d s or haze, S t etue of Irroesti~ation Flirther d e t a i l s on the incident w i l l be obtained but it is doubtful i f sny k t h e r W o m t i o n W i l l indicats the possible identity of the objeat.
  30. 30. CMEP?TIAL- UNCLASSIFIED. PARIS. ILLC:3IS - 9 Octaber 1951 x On 9 October 1951, a t npnroxkmtely 1 5 CST, a ?dvste z i l o t cn route from Crec.ncastle, fxdima, to Paris, 1'-limis, sifhtsr! a silver objeot just e a s t oi' i ' m : ~ ,Illinois, a t 5,000 f t . altitude. 1he object ameared to be etationm-r in as uuch as I t d i d not increase or. dininish in size with the 'iho object then s b x t e d to travel in a northapproach of t h e alrcF&. easterly direction south of the Ilouprt, Indiana, Atomic ,Emera 31ant. (Seo A ~ e n d i x VTIT for related incident,) Weather. Clear, b r i ~ h t sun, no clouds or haze. Ibrc details of the incident uill be oStained. Iieather balloons are *on Qm-sto ffFB whichw aproxi-rlately 45 niles ?lU of the location IS of the inci2ent. It i s verj doubtful If t h i s object m s a W a o n ae the b d l o o n *muld have risen% a mch higher altitude i it had M f t e d SE f from Shanute L 8 F. launchgr!
  31. 31. The o d y inforaation available on t h i s incidont i s 6 lctbr q~tcd lov, k j * at lC,GCO TII4Ea 0632, 11 kt 9. X c X R e i l l y a d I vore f l observing the grab b w balloon u;icn I saw a brigiltly lowi in^ object + the a S.E. of U. of IL Airport, At that ' ' h e ue were a feu r i e s north of I b c * k " . m3e +the fo1l~)wp a l l s and h e a d i y e a s t . I pointed it ocf b ~ i c cn5 ue b 2 ins; observation: m e object was mviq~ z a e a s t to ms', at a h i ~ h h rrr"te c z 1 v c r j h & i. 1.l'e t r i e d -keep* the ship on a w n s t a 3 t c o u s c a x ? u . ~ 5 n reinforcing nenlmr of the ulndshield as a point. degrees per secord . The objoct ruved p s t this m z b r at about 50 'This object uss peculiar in t r a t i t L wt-iat can ke d e s c r l 5 e P as a halo d i around I t vith a dark undersurface. I t crossed ra-icily and then slo;led do-m end started ta c l h b in 1 circles slo*ilr. The ?attern it nadc ucs like a fallinr aek leaf Inverted, I t y n t throu;.h'tf;%se g p z t i o n s for a caugs d a t e s and then with a veqy ronici acceleration L i s ~ . ? p e r e d to the east. '&is object, M c k and I watched for ap3fWdna'vely f i v e aIxu*~es. '1 don't h o w how b deacribe its size, becau~eat tlla t ' L the ball9on Fn sight for a conparison. X didnlt hare '6hortly a f t e r this w e sau another one, t: t h i s one didntf t.=~ d , u arm It aproachcd h r a 'Lbe vest and aiaappearecl to the e a s t , neither one lea* any trnce of vapor trail. q-!hen I saw the seeand one I called our tmc* station at the C of I-?, , Airport anci the obsemers there on the tbedolita mpu' to pt ~ l i q m e s of a number of theu, but wuldntt keep.the t h d o l l t e p * fast emugh to keep thasl in the fielj. of their fnstruzrcnts, J30th b u g kitla and j i c k Larim omght gl-ses of these objecta in the theodolite after I n o t i f i e d tbm of their p s e n c e by radio, Autrther d e t a i l s of the incident have been mquested, The sourcos have been investigated an3 are law= to be exporienaed hAgh a l t i t u d e balloon 6 sar~ers i t h General Y j l l a balloon projects. v UNCLASSIFIED
  32. 32. This is a ~ ~ c i rewrt on thc invecti-etion of C e a l s5.ghtiq of ~q uni::entificZ oer2.a abject. Szeclal mports such as t!lis -.dl3 'cc ndt) Dn o u t ~ * % n d i ~ inci3cnts and in insidonts vhere s-a'c rr re.mrt is reqiiestkd by hickcr outilority,
  33. 33. On 10 and 1 Se?tznbcr 1951, a s e r i e s of both v i s d XI? radar sichtinzs 1 were reporto(.! fran t h e F o r t :bniw~th,lie1 Jorcoy, area, A t ap;)ro;:Lzately 1135 ZDST an ~ ~ i d e n t i f i e o b j e c t uzs sl,nhteci I-Jtho cl p i l o t 9f a 'i-33 d r c r u f t , on Air Torcc L i e ~ k : ~ erxo~,te$ l i t c k e l l Air 'orcc t , 9 Y m c , !Jew i'or::, f r o g Lover a r Force Bzse, ielnwtrl-s. The o b j e c t aF7earod. t be a over Lm:zy l:~o:i, I:ew J e r s e . ~ , betwoen 5OGG f t. a ; &GO ft. a t 1 9 'clock f r ~ n n! 1 the n i n r z f t hacdinp. 'i'he T-_73 vcs ar1?r.x<5::~ttcl;. over i'oint Zlcaeaqt, , ~ c v Jersey, a t tl~e tilie of the i n i t i a l z i ~ f i t 5 i r . L ~ o n secixy the o t j o c t , t h e ? U o t ttr,rh:- doscon:!inrr a t 3m0 turn to the l e f t in en at-e:1p+, to i n t e r c e n t and i d e n t i f y the o ; ~ j e c t . ;i?prcxdnatcly 1,: scc ;niis ctar +the ? i l o t f i r s t oir:!~ted t!le o Y ~ c c ~ , t ! ~ o DoosenFr, an riir Force i k j ~ r , i 1 0t a d b e 3 r ~ e o rcilic, check, sifl1tc.d the o t j o c t . o 5 j o c t xc.s tiicn ner-r i r e e i i ~ l ? ,Ileu icroc;;, t zm!dny a 120° t u r n t o w a r d the coast. :he y i l ~ czlntin;:ed P i s 3 a 0 t=lrn b u t the descen2h-q tli-n the t h e o 5 j e c t was 10::tac i t c r o s s s J t!ie cortct. L r ~ i n c a x e d of t ! ~ c'l.-?t increosec: f o : i~ to 5% x7h m r ! t h e rltitucic Cecreascd j3-m r; .X,00Q f t . to 17,G00 f t , e k e inclozed orc.r;ay,) .- ;hen first, s i ~ h t e d , the o'c,jcct a p - ~ u e t2 be d e s c e ~ d i - T over Sand7 i ? )look, ~ ? C W Jersej-. It then lcvelcd 3uS a ? r - i n t x i n e d a canetant Eititui;e. Tfie o > j c c t ;!as r m n ? zn,!s i l v e r in color ' c ~ 4i;7 not r-cfloct 5 . c s v i L i y i ~ t . t A t ons t h c d x i n . r t i r t ~?ttCrm+yol-? n t e r c a ; ~ t ,it cmecrce f l a t . ikc s i z e uos i 3ui?ce? t be X ft, to jC1 ft. i c?iwztcr. o n A t a--roxl;nntcly 1112 iLS7, 10 S;je?te-iter 1951, t u ~a l l o ~ n s t vcrc released f r ~ t h e :vans S i ~ n a l n Labarctor;;r, Xcu Gcrse-;, l o c c t c d e t 4C.O 1 C l 'n' 3 t't. in an3 74' 01,' E. ( S C O i n c l o s e d overlay. ) These t d 1 0 0 r l s are 7 f t . d i a m t c r a t t h e of r e l e a s e and e a c on a s c e n c i n ~ . ;Icy asccn-: a t an r v c r q c m 9i of 800 fm;l an.! are pdnte-l silver f a r r a ! s tree-dn-. !x=:leric,:~c.c.dt d l z m n observers strlte that uhcn vieuer! f r ~ ccrtcin a r l c s they a7wm L be 6iscn q s b ~ y : d . A t 1135 X S i those balloons uaulj M c ? x e a a t ap-.ra:i-sttely 1E,300 f t . , an: would have m v e d t o a x z i t i o n ncnrl;r i n l h c with 2 o i n t P i c a s m t , Neu Jaroej., an? Sondy IIook. (;.ind S S : a t lC-15 l n o t s . ) - A t t e ~ m t ower9 m.de b u r c ti;= inL"onurti0n oLtair,ec! frao v.e iuterroq s t i o n o f t h e T-?3 crew and t h e data on t h e b a l l m n laimciiinf~tn ?rave t h t t h o n f l o t and pasacnrer of *the 1-33 had obserwod a balloon. iio-ver, n o t all of ere d a b r i v e n uas c ~ n s i s t e n u i t h s~:ct. a c>nclusion, t u t t e n ? t to establish tLe f a c t t h n t the o b j e c t uas a b a l l m n , In a f l i p h t path sixdlnr t o tho one civen tide T-33 c r e u wac asstmed. (%c Ule wA~suned Path of 1-33" i n i n c l o s u r e . ) :e T-33 crev uss intcrroyeted twice h and gave d i f f e r e n t f l i r h t paths r L trcrc*& 3f tte oSJect a t ew:? onc. It l a u theroforo assuncd that ck~eb t h ~ l t i t u t l a an5 swcd of t h o 5-32, a d t!!e fact
  34. 34. U N C ~ ~ ~ ~ l ~ on t t i a t creu ' I I . , ~ inter=% w a t o h i q thc o b j c c t , they coulc! n a t . ; ~ l n ~ i n tiieir 5 nx~ticd r..flec c ~ d Slur it *~aiA1: f e a s i b l e be ~romj *tr~c:<m y c l o s e r Lt n 'o the t, assuylc a f 1 i ~ F . t path within 5 za::'uical iC1es of the given tr:~c!c. Si=1.~o : two in'uamo~ations as t location of t h e p o - u A 2 t r n c l i ~differeci tn cone extent, o t h e t r ~ ~ m ,k o d on e. chart inclulfod ~ 4 t h 9 sipled s t a k x n t i s m s w ~ c dta be tms t n s a r l ; ~ o r r e c t c . Referrinr to tho assuncd fli-ht pat11 3n the inclosed w c r l w , e t A, the object a ? ~ e r c dto be ovor S d y Iiook. It will be no'ed that o c m ~ a t i v o l y srall otjcct closer to thc a/c would n;T,-)ear b b l a r c o i f msmacd to bo over Sandy !bk. (see F i w e 1.) Balloon would ct?r.rear to 'be large if j u d ~ e dto over SanCy lbok. i'osition of T-33 a t tirwt 'of initial a k h t i n g , Figure 1 Plan Viev of I n i t i a l Sighting . (not to 3cal.e) As the % ? : avroachcd t h e ; d o o n , 42.-e balloon er-wirocIto bo t r a v e l b ~ t a t a h i r h rote of sneed, Several seconds ~ u s have qassed aftor ths initial s i p h t l n c chi12 tine ~ i l o deci2cd tt:~:.t t the object Wac not a convantionel a/c and that he should attea?% to i d e n t i Q i t . ~ . ~ - i qt y i s period, it i s a s - w d h that the a c contime ! on course & - h r / t h e objc-ct a??ear b be flyin? e t r e i ~ h t an? l e v e l on a rcci?rocal h e a d i q , 'Ihe f a c t ti-&% o b j e c t appeared t be the a descen3inC: uhen first s i ~ h t o dcnnnot bc e q l a i n c d . The f c c t t h a t onlr one of L5c t-JO bblloans vns seen can be explained by the fact t!:at Q c atseroore conaentrated on ono balloon a. did rut notice t oLcr one. 9J h UNCLASSIUEQ l ~ ~
  35. 35. Forty-five rcc3n3s sftcr the initid a L r : ~ t L i , t h e ?nsr-enyr notcd : be t - i r n i n ~l e f t no?r i+ec!mld, 2ev Jcrr;e;r. T F . 3 C M be at h e ot,ject the fact t k a t tlio 7-33 vas W n i q CIL t.hc r c h t i v c notfon cc.sod plaincd t h e ball003 t a ? ? o r r t be t u r n i n y . A s t h e '2-33 continuc.2 inlax?, t k n lize a a of sight chq.o;l u n t i l the balloon vos cilhouot+&d 4 a i n : t tl:c cce or sk.and bsiry. silver blon2e.I Lib the bac2:.~mnd an:; WGS l o a t . I w d s 'Cisan?ear~~ccn of bsljioons io a co:-1-n occure_?ccwi'th ? i l o & tracZn(l roscarch b d l a c n s . It ir, a3?aront fron t h c above t h a t smcrcl a s s l l i ~ ~ t i o n s to & aac?e ivd i n orlZIer b s k i ; r t h i t t h e object MAS one of t!le W o o n s reloascl? a t Xvms S i p o l k h r e t q q , tut t k e fact L.here w a s a bollo~min %iionccx r i c i n l t j . m 2 the fact t??n-t; the p i l o t mil obser~crm r o n o t sure o I their exact track aclds . a p a a t deal of credence the a s c m ~ t i o n s . .::orcvor, since' as%:a-tio:is were o 3 t e c t was d o f i n l t c l y a b a l l ~ n . ' d e , it c m i ~ be concluciec! t h a t t . A31 of t ; re-1a.r s i ~ h t i n r sCurirq? t h i s ?erio2 ucro r d e b stuZento !c ; at t);.~ ;brdiuC? trainin: centcr. 31 sd,',ition t triis, the stucients. inFort a instrictor crodd ?ut c e r - a ? v a l v d were 'i, &na Tlaintoga.ce co-mce. necisnical o r electronic difficulty ln t h e cctt a.. l o t ti!-,o stuc3errt f i n 2 a-?d .1 1: ; rc;.,cd;r t r a u b l e . If t h e s t d e n t bccnrlo ?rol'iclant i n this phase, he r a allowed J t o-ercltc the r;c% a mc'n the-sale as i n t a c t i c a l o y r a t i ~ c z . : o p l o t t i a r reo c ~ r J c ,lots o r data of q v t p e mrc kept. It should 'e stressed t i ; a t these studen* xero zaLntcnanca strtfente, n o t o ~ r s t o r s . 1, On 1 0 Sc?tcqbcr 1951 an A ! T / L G - ~ r a 2 e r s e t .,is:ieb u? a f a s t :eterli:ieC) c t a??m::i-zi*~cl-/ ~lovi~, low-flyin? -!m;et (exact a l t i t u d e U10 b-ours s a u t h c a ~ t F o r t :bn;lou+,!l a t a r a g e o f abaut 1 , , X O yari:s. I l e of t & r f c t a?pemt?d b o~r~:;i-a'tely fo1101.r t'ic c o a s t linc c:~a.cLw- i t s r q - e onl? r l i g i l t l y h u t c3mrin-; i t s azi-r~uth a p i ? l y . r T l r a d a r set r r ~ s io ct?ftzteL + P i a aided a z 5 r u t i l trac;:in,n wl;ici~n o r . l a U ; ~ s fact e m u - h ta track I c t & c I ' R ~ ~ , i b u t i n tihis case was too cloy t be rcsor'tcl t o . PIC o tnrzc$ was l o c t in the n o r t h e a s t at a raye of sbout l.&,000 yards. i l y n i n f i i r r u g a t i o n , it uac f o r i d tt!tt the O?~C*UO~, U:IO . W r13re t. t m t h o averqc s t u d e z t , uas rivinf a de:lonstration f o r E. :7m3 of v i s i t i n ? officers. Ec asnmed t;?rthe w a s nicidflyr U? a hi.-h-s_3eed aArcr<t because of his i n a b i i i t y t o use full-aided a z i i m t h trac>zinr vihich v l l l n ~ r x i l l y track an uircrhft e t spetx2s u.7 t 700 A?h. o L b c e he c ~ u l dm t trac:i tke t a r p t he s s s u ~ o r lits s9ee5 t o be about 700 n7h. lbwever, he a l s o mcle the s t a t e w n t that ho trsckcc! thc.oLject o f f and on fron 1111 trJ 1U2, or three &i.tes. Us* t h i s timz a d the p o u n d track, thc opeod i s 0 r 2 j about 420 nyh. n cx-rinnce Na definite conclcsions can be given duo to %l lac:: of a c m a t c !e data b u t i t i s biir1d.y prob&>lc tirat due to t h e f h c t t - it G i e o;mrcL>r w a s r i v i n g : rl a dc~lbnetrctioll" a p o u ? of o f f i c e r s , a112 tket he Cwu.7i~t picked up e very a he uaPtaual raclar rc:twn, he V ~ Din an escito?? s t a t e , a c z o ~ ~ t i n o r his i n a b i l i t y fto usc full-aided au*cst i c trac:cinr. i &Attod he i a c 'blchljr flustraLd" k in m bein.. c u e b keep up uith t h e tarcat u s i n c the aide5 ~.-LC:& t ' 3 c voat5er on 10 S c p t o ~ ~ b e r n o t favoroblo f o r anozdous ;>romation. 118s
  36. 36. 2. 3n 10 Se?'&zber 1951, 1515 hours, m SCR 5G4, serf al n-z136:r 4 7 3 , tracked 6 t a r ~ s u?Lch mves ebct olouly 3n azl-ruth norti1 of Fort ;bmmutk a t t . a r a c e of &bout 32,OGO FIE at t2.e e~tre-iely ~ c s u r elevation ~ x z 1 eo r 13% ~ tl T h i s w L s ~ r ~ to be a weauicr c n nils, ( a l t : k d e an3r9xinatoly 9 7 , W f t . ) in~ balloon. I t vas +sacked a t %?.e request of the C o ~ ~ c L n d 3fi'icer of tile Student A t t a c h e n t tcr, d e t c m h c tho a l t i t u d e in order to e s t a b l i s h who won a p o l conc r : r n i q v I w .the ci3tit;rcie of c balloon k-hich was sichtceci ni~litje. ~ I . ' r 3. ~ nll S e p t e ~ > h1951, 1950 t:o*rrs, tsr3 SCB 5S&@s, sar;al nu-ber 2l7 and 215, ~ i c k c ? the s a x *e;st northeast of T o r t I brxmuth a t an elcvction up ancle of ?€I to 309 rdls a t n r q e of a~:;rc):d.~atel;r 30,000 yariis (a?-mo>:kiate a l t i t u d e 31,000 f e e t ) . i'he s e k t r a c k auto:-nticnlly in. azWth ad elevation and vith oizcd ranee trac:dny are canzblo of tsnc:iinp t a r g c t c ur, to a o w e 2 of cese, horrever, 'Loth s e t s foun3 i t Frxposcible t track the a 700 nof.,. In t a r z e t in ranfe duc to itxi s ? o d an2 t!lc o ~ r a t o r s had to r e s o r t to rm11d t ran-.-e trcc;tiq7 i n orcler to hold the t a r z e t . P4e t a r ~ c vas tracked in t9A3 rs m Um to tf:e ; . Z T t S ~ c k i q - r a T c of 72,050 yari!~, The o ~ r a t ~ ) Jur:.~cd E l r t h o tar@ to be noving a t a s p e d several hundred n i l e ~per hour higi:er than 2rovided the na;;irar'~ d c d t r a c k i q s b i l i t y of t h e rdar s e t s . "r'his t a r ~ e t d an e m i c l j r s t r o r q r e t u n echo at tirres cveu t'r,o7qh it was a t ~ i n m e , r q burner, t h e c c b siFal occasionrlPj f e l l off t o a l e v e l bolou n o r 4 return. These c h a q c s coincided uit'c rmckvcrc of t-':e t r r ~ e t . This oighQw ?roved t be a ueatner S d l o o n . Eov it was detera nincd is tn . . but A l I C was iiior;:$d tlrzt it was a bslloon t i - A-3I:tX t a l e e m i hyn TI-251?, datcc? 5 0cta:bcr 1951, G G Iten -'1?, A which s k k d ; "Wcr siriitiqr vas later i12enti,"icc? os ven*&cr balloon. ?'ar.:ct track was v e r t i c a l . Later exploded and desccs2cci t 3 ,ground. 1 : 4 On 1 Se3terhr 1951, a t atout 133C, a tar,-et v a E nicxed u, on an SCEi5Z4 rdar set, s e r i a l m ~ ~ b e r t'nat 2fs?ln;.ed m :md : ~ ~ . c w c r a b i l i ~ %e -~;et yas q _ o r o x d t e l y Dvor i ; a v c s b k , ; b : r Jersey, as i n i i c a t e d by i t s lO,(k"O yard rar.ye, 6 , 0 ~ 0 e e t altitu6e m: due north u i n u t h , The t a r : - e t f a rc:lainod p r a c t i c a l l y s k t i o n a q r on 5 0 s c q e and a93cared to Cc kovcrinr. T e 1 h o~rntors lookad out of C-.,a van in e attex?t to see t!;e-tarzet s i n c e i t rras ? at such a s h o r t r.?nfo, hove-rer, w o r c a s t c~.nciitions9rever.tod m.ch ohservation. Retumh;. t their o x r a t i n , r positions 3 1 0 + A , - c t as otscrved to be chaq-in:: o its e l e m t i o n at en extre---.l:..m y i d r n k , tI;e cIA~z;e i ran,-e uae so s:;all the n onerntors kelicve5 *e t a r f - e t .mst hzvc r i r e n n e a r l y vertically. Tine tarret . ceased i " ~ 3rfse i ? elevation a t an elevation culglo of ap?ro::irlatoly 1,%0 :.as at which the it 9rocecdeb to nove a t an e:;trencl:; ra3id ra*& in r a x o Fn o soutk4erlyd i r e c t i o n once a g d n the s ~ e d t ! e " t a r ~ c toccce2in- the aided of trac:&c abiUt2- of the SGiLS8L so t!!t m ~ trac:riv becax n o c e s s q . ~ xl i The radar 'zaclieci t i e t a r r e t to the &u .1 r a y e of 1 - yards a+, ~1Lic;i k i c ,, : 0 t the tar@ vos at an elevition sn-le of 3 3 .as. Ele opernwrs did m a t b a ? t t to juGre t!!c c?ecci in excess o f the a i d 0 6 trackdtry r a t e of 700 q9h. It i s hi~:hl.; probable tkot t h i s i s an exanale of nnmalr>us F r o p q y t i o n as the u e G ~ e r ll S e ? t e ~ b c r on ;ras favoratlc for L!is t ; ~ c of ahcnonellon. %lo stxdentr s%'d Uai tkcy uerc avcvc of i b i s ?henonenan, h ~ v w e r , it is biphly >robable that t4 tile qrcviaus s l r h t l n ~ o uhot t h e y t t ~ a u r t t of vere u n u s d types of b r c r d t , they were in t h o correct psycliolo~icalm ~ i t i o n , to seo noro such otjec'a. L .
  37. 37. a bnllmn 1a~ic::ed b Yae Lbrins L i s a L hbora-mry .a f e w binutcs befire the-T-.73 j arrive2 in ttlc tirea. B . ?lie 1110 E d 1 r a d a r s i - n t L w on 10 Scpterlbar 1951 vno n o t noaosscrrily : s a very hicC-mead aircraft, 1 s p e n d was judfcd only b,: t?le o?crator I s inWLAS mscibly Zue to tho o-%rotor b * e a t i l i t y to uae aided trzcl5.n; e-12 oxciAted, an.? not L . hirh speed of the aircraft, be C. m 1515 E S T ra:im s i ~ h t a y 10 Se;>ter~br e on 1951 3. The 10% ELST radw sirhting on ll Lepterbor 1951 uas a weather bdlmn, b x ~ 3a leather balloon. E. I'he 1 3 3 X T rtx?.rr si(li.,ti? on 11 Septeubor 1951 rep-ains unknovn but it was v e r y p x c i b l c that it was due to anordous pro;7asction md/or the 3tdent m3ar operators' tliowtts t h a t tkere uas a eroat d 6 d of aativity of unccual objocta in tho area.
  38. 38. - p,: I ~ i h L- k. .. -- , , r:,i-71;. c * ;, 1 ;;-.L A UNCLASSIFIED. HOOK, N J . . Re.xrtud Path of Objeot ~ e ~ r t oPath o f T-33 a ' Assumed Path of T-33 OVERiAY OF m! PORK SE;CTI*3i3AL. B a l l m n at 1135 Initial Sighting Object b a t Seaward
  39. 39. PROJECT GRUDGE 31 DECEMBER 1 9 5 1 PROJECT NO. 10073
  40. 40. 1 Information c o n f l i c t i n g with o r p e r t i n e n t l y a f f e c t i n g . t h a t c o n t a i n e d i n t h i s p u b l i c a t i o n s h o u l d b e forwarded by t h e r e c i p i e n t d i r e c t l y to: C h i e f , Air T e c h n i c a l I n t e l l i g e n c e C e n t e r Wright-Patterson Air F o r c e B a s e Dayton, O h i o T h i s i n n o w a y a b r o g a t e s o r a l t e r s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y for s e n d i n g s u c h i n f o r s a t i o n o r a n y pertinent i n t e l l i g e n c e d a t a through a l r e a d y e s t a b l i s h e d i n t e l l i g e n c e c o l l e c t i o n c h a n n e l s of t h e v a r i o u s s e r v i c e s o r a g e n c i e s o f t h e U. S. government. 2. WARNING: T h i s document c o n t a i n s information aff e c t i n g t h e n a t i o n a l d e f e n s e o f t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s within t h e m e a n i n g o f t h e E s p i o n a g e L a w , T i t l e 18, U.S.C., S e c t i o n s 793 a n d 794. I t s t r a n s m i s s i o n o r t h e r e v e l a t i o n of i t s c o n t e n t s i n a n y m a n n e r to a n u n a u t h o r i z e d p e r s o n is p r o h i b i t e d by l a w . UNCLASSIFIED
  41. 41. Classification cancelled * s r66 6 4 0 STATUS REPORT NO. 2 PROJECT GRUDGE 31 DECEMBER 1951 PROJECT NO, lG073 Classification cancellea w o . - ---- ---- Published By AIR TECHNICAL INTELLIGENCE CENTER WRlGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE DAYTON. OHIO
  42. 42. This r e 3 o r t is the s e e m 8 of a s e r i e s of nonthly status r e ~ r t s t of R o j e c t Gm3ge. Each r e ~ r w i l l be written on or near the last day of the ranth and vill contain a l i s t of all incidents reported -in,, t3.e nonth c~vercdby the re?ort. The r e ~ r t sh a t are cont aid.cred to 'be outstanding w i l l be swmarized. in the ao?endices of the rormrt SO t k e t m s e d e t d l s can %e presented. The o v e r a l l s k t u s of the p r o j e c t w i l l also be presented. Additional i n f o m a t i o n zn;r be obtained on any incident b - d i r e c t i n 5 ; requests to Chiof, kir TecWcal Intelligence Centor, Attention: AT-Zc, k i ~ h t ? a t t e r s o ariir force Ease, bayton, Ohio.
  43. 43. STATUS OF PROJt;CP GRULGE O1lERA1J, STATUS A, Files The n a J o r i t y of the t h e devoted to Project Grudge durfry! Cne period covered in t h i s S t a t u s Iieport, 30 fbvembor 1951 to 31 Lecember 1951, has been spcnt in s o r t i n g and f i l i n g old i'roject Grudge and a o j e c t S i p f i l e s . All of a t h e incidents datinp back t 1946 t h a t are in ATIC have been sgrted and f i l e d . There a r o approximately 800 on f i l e . k c h incident has been put in a aeparak folder and f i l e d i n chronological order. Sunnary cards a r e being m a d e on each incident. These s u ~ n a r ycards vil.1 include data such as description of the oSject, course, a l t i t u d e , speed, maneuvers, c t c . These cards w i l l then be cross-inriexed i n an atternpt t o obtain I t i s contemplated t h a t t h i e crossc h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o r trends i n tine sightinp. indexinp w i l l be completud by the middle of February. B, 1-Iissiq %ports and Photographs It i s apparent t h a t t h e - d e t a i l s of s o m of the reports betueen e a r l y 1949 and nid-1951 are nissiw. An a t t e q t w i l l be made to obtain these r e w r t s from c?thcr agencies so t h a t f f ~ e T I C f i l e w i l l be conplcte. ?hob.--ranhs reA ferred b i n some r e ~ o r h are a l s o d s ~ i q - . Although thcre have not been very many p h o t c p a ~ h sof alle~edunusual a e r i a l objects suhnitted to K I S , thcre havo been a f e w anti an a t t e n p t w i l l bc m d e to o b t a i n p r i n t a of these gha+~ogrnphs. C, Map f o r P l o t t i n g S i g h t N s A large nar, of the United S t a b s i s being oropared and i s nearly completed. All of tho s i g h t b p s u i l l be p l o t k d on this m p i n an a t t e n p t to e s t a b l i s h sone nettorn in the siphtinps. A c o l o r code w i l l be worked o u t 80 t h a t as much i n f o m a t i o n as possible can be g r a ~ h i c a l l y l l u s t r a t e d on the nap, i It u i l l be -noted in tine l i s t of incidents t h a t i s c~ntciinedin t h i s r e q o r t t h a t the i n v e s t i g a t i o n s of s i g h t i n e s reported scveral nonths ego are s t i l l p e n d m o r t h a t some s i g h t i q - s have not been investigated due to the tim t h a t has elapsed since the s l ~ h t i ~The ixxvestip.ations bein2 con.l~ctedin . conjunction with the p r o j e c t a r e s t i l l being hanpered by the delays i n receiving infonmtion. On 25 October 1 9 5 1 , - i t was requested t h a t AFOIlL-CG1 l e t t e r dated 8 Se.jtmnbor 1950 s u b j e c t r " R e ~ r t i n y = o m t i o n on Vnc~nver.tionalarcraft * of be revised and r e c i r c u l a t e d to dl iiF c o d a . It is h o d t h a t as s m n as t h i s is 'done the s i t u a t i o n vl inprove. il
  44. 44. h a d d i t i o n t o delays i n receiving a d d i t i o n a l i n f o m k t i o n , i t i s bel i e v e d that many sightingc of u n i d e n t i f i e d o b j o c t s arc n o t b c i r y reportad a t all. This b e l i e f i s founded on the fact t h ~ ATIC has received newswpor clinp-s t or requeots f o r infornation on s i g h t i n & s about which t h e r e is no i n f o r z i t i o n i n the records. of Several conferences have been held with n e ~ t c r s a p r o n i n e ~ tresearch organization t o d e t e r l i n e whether o r not there i s enough i n f o r n a t i o n a v a i l e b l e on the u n i d e n t i f i e d a e r i a l o b j e c t s to warrant a thorowh s c i e n t i f i c i m e s t i p n t i o n . Theso p e o ~ l e v e incl>ectRd the f i l e s , discussed the proble;~,' and it i s t h e i r b oninion t h a t thero are enough r o ~ o r t s h a t cannot be explained by W w n o b j e c t s t or phenomena b warrant a d e t a i l e d i n v e s t i g a t i o n . Several o t h e r proninant encincers and s c i e n t i s t s have been contacted and t h e i r opinions are much t h e s&le a s those s t a t e d above. Negotiations are underway to o b t a i n the s e n t i c e s of c ~ n s u l t a n t si n t h e f i e l d s of physics, n i c l e a r physics, astronony, p ~ ; r c l i o l ~ ~ yc . , to assist in et , the d y s i s of the r o w r t s . These c o n s u l t a n t s w i l l &SO a t t e q t to make a continuirq s t a t i s t i c a l analysis o f t h e r e p o r t s i n an a t b m 7 t t o deternine whether o r n o t t h e r e i s any g i g ~ l i f i c a n tp a t t e r n o r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s in t h e sichtings. In t h i s r e s p c t , i t i s h o y d that the p r o j e c t can receive tlle full cooperation of all c~mlan!s in pronptly r e p o r t i n z all s i e h t i c p of u n i d e n t G f i e d a e r i a l o b j e c t s , s o t h a t as clany authentic r e p o r t s aa possiblo will be a v a i l a b l e f o r study by s t a t i s t i c a l analysis. A . Inclosed Sun- List of Incidents The inclosed l i s t i s (1) a surrnary of all i n c i d e n t s r m o r t e d durte k period o f 30 Ilover~ber1951 t 2 1 Lecenber 1951; (2) those i n c i ~ l c n t st h a t were a r e m r t e d in Str-tus I b m r t 110. 1, dated 30 Xovernber 1951, ad s t i l l have t h e conn c l u s i o n s oendiw; and ( ! ) thoso i n c i d e n t s t h a t have been c l o s e 3 during t h e month covered b the r e ~ r t . j Incidents which are considered too d e t a i l e d to sunna~izei n the Ust o f eighQs are again g-iven in the appendices, and in greater detail.
  45. 45. -"--JSltlt SlGHTlNGS O UNIDENTIFIED OBJECTS F -DESCRlPTlOh 8 l u g 51 1 2110 Qroup o r l i l h t a t h a t hare b a n seen on mmy o e c a a l o ~ . (50s Aplaadb I) Dark flflnv wine t y p a/c with about 1 1/2 t h e 8 t h e d n g a p n o r a 8 9 . -6 ( 9 0 Appandix 11) 51 2, 1.6 51 m 0 1 31 1.6 5 1 a 5 I Yltador, ) Sa.L 51 9 00t 51 1 9 OeA 5 1 I lo m 51 1 % I ~ i I Bluish-rhlte l l ~ h wlth fiery t r a i l . t Spokane, fish. 1 Blulsh-.hifa / j 1 e oajects q p a r e d out o r momcular. Lar ntwn Object n. About t h e s i r e of an a u b u + h l l e henillght. Aspara* t o be n die. when hr twon* a U q h t about t h e s i r e of en automobile h e a d l i c h t l e a d w a n e l t~r a i l . - QCA radar o b e m e d 8 1 ~ h t e dover l n v Beach. ( . objects m u r Four I-.%ls P a ~ i e ,I l l . o Y~M. 1 Roud,ailver I I Roun~, I ta high aped ll n . M I ~ocomls a 1 limbs scra!ablel and a i g h l d object Over *Io. o r b i t t e d ~ r e AQ a t 5 , h 5m ~ t . 1 Intercapt ma u ~ u c c e a s r u ldue t o a l t i t u d e o r o b j e c t . j 1 I nnrsiis, Saveral the airfield. Unknom Nom 1 ' nigh bm -Tii * Vuid a ' l a f. i I I pilots and I N f u r t h e r iora.tigatlon. o I I *P W L . h and .ih 1 Z"j" m0 Lor m0 l /PO YO conclusion.. I I Lar 1 i A? YOT Believed ta be meteor ar f i e b a l l . lio oonclwionm. Yo aonclruiolu. AF 1 s t Lt Bellered ta be a meteor o r f i e b a l l . N aorrlwionr. o 1 a 0 m * lppdh fl 1 1 high Unk- I 1 6 . Sandla Base guard I md l i f e I I mrcL1 Erratic 1 1 nono , 1 _ - (. l I N s further n i m e a t ir u ttiio n .. o In ulllcla t info pa on n . Mona SO. ~ p p a n d i x I / ( h e Appndix IV) h;.luute, ' High and a v a l n fro. t m a i r e r r a h . P e a r - s b p d alualnvn o b j e c t seemed t o hovar then l e a n tha area a,%high s p e d . ( h e lppandLr 111) I IM h r c h 11, ca-lif mud Brisht orange l l g h t seen from the hose M, Yowfoundlmd I210 l a ' Spahano, Rash. W O MO 25 % ( 5 1 I I Texas S p a l u n , rash. I 5 s p t 51 1 h p t 51 fandalia, I l l . mo ' ACTION OR COU%'ENlS Albuquerque, N.Y. 2 lug 5 ) Sapt 5 1 OF INCIDENT Lbbock, Tam. 3 2151 ---~W~DEWIAI colored o b j e c t p s s a d over a i r p o r t a t high s p e d . (:A# l p ~ e r d h V) k r y high Vary high object / P P m) ~ ~ by ~ i i t~a cu i n g a b n o o n . ( 9 e A r k nigh I I, I II ~nknom 1%' 5,000 ft. L5' n ~igh I ! B ~ O ob.. U I 1 h e 1 p p n d i x VII. High Minutea l o oonelwion~. 1 2 1 Oat ,% 1 05002 I j 62% 1591 Yleta, 1 I Briqht pllo.lah 0ra.Ri.h-blue I 19)0 )O O& 5 1 . Tow Conurs, Col '/ *o*u 07 110 otc sza ( 0 1 - brilliant l i ~ h .irk an i n c a n d e s n n t g t r In the t ton of - 1 1 I Wmm u*mm 6 tail. Object appeued .hlb f l r s t , then nd. Con glowed d t h b r i l l b n t 5e*U Color 1 * l. mon tube. 4 &TIC flash on t h e horison. High Lw- I wm u*m I &own Waknmn umknom 1 Dnknomi Scientist I B ta $W A? Major Y (a I ' ~ 1 Cirililn - 1I I b p l e o r groan firab.11 p h e n n e n . N oonclusiolu. o U p L of p a a n f i r a t a l l Dh.ivmma. 10 o o ~ ~ l w i o ~ . PAGE j
  46. 46. I . GISCUSSXON OF TIC, IKCIiiEIJT The f i r a t of a s e r i e s of s i g h t i n 7 s r e l a t e d to t h i s i n c i d e n t occurred the eveno f 25 -st 1951 a t a p n r o x h a t o l y 2110 CST. r'our Texas Technical College profesoors were . s i t t l r y in the backlard o f one o f t h e p r o f e s s o r t & hones observing m e t e o r i t e s i n conjunction with a study of nicroriotcorites ,being c a r r i e d o u t by pass overhead f r o n 1 t o S. 1 t h e college. A t 2120 they observed n Crou? of l i ~ h t s n The U ~ h t s had about t h e saxe i n t e n s i t y as hiph c i r u s clouds D a n x - f l i c h t n i ~ h t . Tho a l t i t u d e was n o t detornined b u t *ey t r a v e l e d a t a h i c h rate or' s7eed. The pattern o f t h e l i r h t s w a s a l n o s t a p e r f e c t se;li-circle containinl; frm 3 t 30 a i n d i v i d u a l l i p h t s . L a t e r i n t h e e v o n i q a sinilar i n c i d e n t was observed and durinq a period o f a b u t t h r e e weeks a t 3 t a l o f a p r o x i n a t e l g twelve (12) such f l i g h t s were observed by t h e s e 'men. * The groun o f men included: a . b . The Head o f the ? e t r o l e u n n g i n e e r w Lepartnent h o f e s s o r o f Geology, has ?hD. d, R o f e s s o r o f Physics, has Phb. h o f o s c o r o f C h e i c n l Z n ~ i n c e r i ~ , PhD. has c. Besides t h e above f o u r nen, a, b. follo:<ing have observed t h e i n c i d e n t s ; R o f e s s o r o f :.hther-zatics, has Phu. Graduate s t u d e n t working on W . In a d d i t i o n , a R o f e s s o r o r i ~ s t r m o n y was consulted on t h e i n c i d e n t , b u t he d i d n o t observe any o f t h e s e f l i g h t s . The above mentioned nen took a personal i n t e r c s t i n the ?henomno an2 underatuc?y o f the o b j e c t s . AttRrlpts were mFide t o o b t a i n an a l t i t u 6 e neasurotlent by l a y i n c o u t a measured base line perpendictrlar t o the u s u a l f l i ~ h path t of t h e o b j e c t and p l a c i n g q l e n e a , u i n g d ~ v i c e s t h e end of t h e base line, at houevcr, all t h e i r attennta f a i l e d because tht: o b i e c t s d i d n o t a T e a r on the a i g h t s t h e o b s e m e r o u e r c waiting f o r then. W 8 6 R o n t h e s e r i e s o f observationci, the following f a c t s were obtained: a . The @r a b , There waa no sound that cauld be a t t r i b u t e d a. The f l i g h t path o f t h e o j j e c t vhe from N to S in t h e majority o f t h e f fflctts a l t h o ~ h sone were I= to Sd. d, On s e v e r a l e h t 3 L'1ere wuro two o r three f l i g h t s , v e l o c i t y o f t h e o b j e c t was v e r y n e a r l y 30° o f arc ,per second. to t h e objoct.
  47. 47. UNc4ssfE,EQ 8. The c o l o r of the l i r h t s was blue-green. f . There wcrc fmn 1 5 to 30 separate U g h t s i n each f o ~ ~ t i o n . g. The f i r s t two flightr, obsenred were a seni-circle of rL,*hts b u t i n h. The o b j e c t always anpcare.1 a t an arq-le of about 45O f r o n horizontal i n t h e north and disappeared. a t about 450 i n the south. The o b j e c t d i d n o t c a d u a l l y corn i n t o view as would Bn a i r c r a f t angrdaching frm a distance, n e i t h e r d i d i t g r u d u d l y disan7ear. i. Thero was no apqarent c h a n ~ oin s i z e as the o b j e c t passed overbed. j . The "anplar span " was estinnted t o be lo0. subsequent f l i g h t s t h e r e w c s no orderly m q e ~ a m t . A t t o m p , t s were made t o o b t a i n ' t l e r e l a t i v e h e i ~ h of the object i n r e s x c t t However, these a t t c n p t s were a l s o unsuccessful due to the f a c t t h a t t h e objec t.s passed between v i d e l y s c a t t e r e d cloues. to clouds. Atteslpts were m d e to . d e b m i n e whether o r n a t there was any f o m betseen t h e l i ~ h t by t q d n r to see stars between the l i c h t s . These a l s a was unnicceoss ful due to the s h o r t timc the o b j e c t wks I n view. This ohenonena was obsenrerl by a t l e a s t one -red peo-,lc in anc armnd Lubbock, Texas. S. o- 01. these peo?le were of the o9inion t h a t t h e o t j c c t s were birds. r a f l e c t i n ~ i r h t s Tron tile c i t y . l On the evening of 31 A u p s t 1951 c t about 2330 C:;T, a college f r e s h a n ,br~a Texas Tech observed a f l k i l t of tho unidentified objects ?ass over his horn. Tie t fliplht was observed thraugh an open window. limn obscrrinp tho f i r s t f l i ~ h df t h e objects, the observer obteined his cazera a n 2 vent i n t o thc bac:p.r1 o f his hone in an a t t c n p t to s e t photofrar~hsof additional f l i e l ~ t s the object. of b (Comontr i h i s would be 10,sical a s by 31 hum;st 1951 t i c s o f l i r h t s of Ele 3 Sects, and t h e f a c t tht s e v e r a l f l i q h t s d c h t occur i n a cvenLq, wns veil t known.) h nore f l i ~ i ~ ofs the o b j e c t allecedly did occur and were phatoyaphed. Two photos of ono r l i e h t and t h r e e of anothor were obtained. AYIC has few of t h e negatives but the o t h e r one w a s l o s t o r rls?laced by the ?ho'k=~aaher. The photoFaphs show a V-s>ar>ed forrxition of l i r h t o . In one p h ~ t a ~~~~~V of a l i g h t s appear, while on t h r e e ~ h o t o sthere i s a double-V. The s e x i r a t s l f g h t s , which apvear tco be ?inpoint l i g h t sources, vtsy i n intensity. (See Appendix A. I1 f o r possibly r e l a t e d inci3ents.C) Trip to Lubbock, Texas a A t r i p was made to Lubbock Texas on &9 lbven3er l 9 f l t o3tain nore d e t r i l s on tile incident. Iran;r = o d e rr!:o sesn the o b j e c t o r u!m sere L n 3 l r a d i n the i n c i d e n t wore i n t a r m n a t e d . k co;l:c.rence was held with the colleee prof e s s o r s and they prepwed a cignod s t a t e z o n t d e s c r i b i w the objects tiney they h obaemed.
  48. 48. with OSI, i n repard The photographer wns LnterrogatoZ, in c ~ n j u n c t l o n M s account of the Incident soened l o ~ i c d , to the photneraphs of t h e objects. and t h e r e were no obvious i n d i c a t i o n s of a h o a . The ?hotofrapher had p e v i o u s l y been l n t e r r ~ c a t e dby t h e Lubbock newspaFer and t h e ?hot03 i n s . ~ c t e dby Associated I t was t h o i r opinion t h c t the ~ h o t o s R o s s and Life I.kcazino re?resentntivas. a were n o t obviously a hoax. The c o l l e c e professors were doubtfbl as t whether o r n o t t h e photofrapho were of the sa-ie objects t h a t t h e y had otservcd because: 1 They hnd never observe? a V - s h a ~ d formation of l i g h t s . T h i s i s . n o t too s i g n i f i c a n t , howev~r, as the arranpenent of the l l c h t s t h a t they oboemcd varied and since t h s r e were s e v e r a l f l i c h t s the college professors 9ossibly d i d i; n 3 t see ths f l i y h t s t h a t were photoyrraohed. In'addition, tn ?hotcy-rapher s t a t e s t h a t tho .object a??eared to be U-sha?ed b u t when he develoy>ccl the n c c ~ t i v e s ,t h e o b j e c t voa V-shaped. 2. The o b j e c t s t h a t t h e ?rofessors observed were, i n t h e i r opinion, n o t b r i q h t enough to be photographec?. I?-As i s , howevor, an estimate and could be in e r r o r ; It w a ~ found t h a t one school of thourht of the people in the Lubbock area was that the o b j e c t s were sone tj-pe of Grratory bb!s r e f l c c t i n r l i y h t fkon the c i t y . Sevzral pco7le rcrror*ucd t h a t thcy d e f i n i t e l y h c v the o b j e c t s were birds because thcy c o d $ s e e wiqs 'flapping ' , It i s very possible t h a t sozle of the peo?lo 1~110were lookinc f o r the o b j e c t d i d s e e ducks a s t h e r e were duck f l i r h t s p a s e w over during t h e period. The c o l l e g e professors do n o t believe the theory t h a t the o j j e c t s were t ~ b i r d s , but thoy a r c ~ i v i n! e y s s i b i l i t y :=re t h o ~ y h t . I f t h e y uerc birds, t!~ey would have to be r e l a t i v e l y low to give the i l l u s i o n of hich o w e d . An occasional f l i r h t of b i r d s n i p h t pass low over a c i t y on a c l e a r n i , r h t b u t it is hi€'hly doubtful i f they would continue to do this f o r several nighto. I C ~ r a t o r y b i r d s usually try to keep away f h m c i t i e s . The Federal X l d Life G a i e arden vns v i s i t e ? and a l t h o q h h e was n o t fa-zilior via tho i n c i d e n t he doubtcd i f the o b j e c t s were birds. IIe stated that they c o d d have been, houever. i'hc n o s t 1ii:cly suspect, i f it i s a b i r d , i e a neaber of the Plover f d y which has a puro white b r e a s t , b c t unless there was a sudden i n f l u x of the b i r d s into the Lubbock area, the ra-.;e warden dwbtod i f there would be enough of these b i r d s to : d e u? as m y f l i g h t s as were obsemcd , If the photos arc authentfc, t h e o b j e c t s very mobably are n o t ducks beceuse an emerienced photo,pe>hcr from thc Lubbock Avalanahe Ilewsnaper atteypted to g e t photos of d ~ c i c s US* b l t h natural l i p h t and flaph, but f a i l e d . B . Analysis of .'hotas by Wright ldx h v e l o p n c n t Center The Photopanhlc P.econnaissance Lahrutory of UAiC nade a preliminary analysis of the photop~ar>hs. The a n a l y s i s was d e by ins?cctlnz the noeativee in a conparetor nicroecope, Their c o n c l ~ s i o n s werec
  49. 49. 1 The W e s on the neeatives were caused by licht: s t r i k h g . film, ( . . ie, 2, unexposed the neentives were not retouched). The i n ; l i v i M lights i the wfonaationvvnried in intensity. n The i n t e n s i t y uas -eater than any s m o u n d i q s t a r s as the o t a r s did n a t repis ter. (';he photos were talcon under C A W conditians. ) 3, 4, C. The W i v i d m l l i e h t a c h q e d position in the Iffomation:'. Reintmrrofation of the Photographer The OSI ucs requested b r e i n t e r r o r a t e the ~hotographerin anotller attmnt to d e t e h e the a u t h c n t i c i b j of the photogra~hs. The d e t a i l s of t h i s reinterrogation have not been received but a preliainary r o ~ r stated t h a t t thore were no indications *&at the phobyro9hs were not authentic. D. Future Investigations A t r i p to Lu5boc2, Texas, w i l l be nade dwing January. /*ranr-enents are bein;! nade to have a 3rojcct Grudre consultant end a nhysicist acconpany ProJcct Grudee personnel. If the ~ h o t o p a o h sarc authentic, they are inportant in that8 1 . They vl d v e an accrtrate neasurenent of the 'angular span". il 2. the eye, The l i ~ h source9 a l t h o ~ c h appeared to be of low I n t e n s i t y t o t it MS hichlx actinic. 3. The rjovrr,ient of the individual l i ~ h t s * in . e studied fbrther. 4 Density . c o ~ i s o tests can be nade. n fornation can be
  50. 50. I . DISCUSSION OF 1liCI~::Ifi On the ovcninp of 25 Aqwst 1951, a t 2158 >ST, a Sandia Base S e c u r i t y Guard and h i s wife observed what tney described to be a fly*wing type a i r c r a f t sinilar to tho Northro? F y ' ; l-.* Boxber (P-49)noss over the bacuard of their trailer hono in the e a s t ?art of Albuquerque. I'hey judged tho uinq span of the a i r c r a f t to be abotlt ano and one half t i n e s the wine span of a B-36, with which t they were f a n i l i a r . Ihc o b j e c t wc?s f l y i n g lot!, tine a l t i t u d e uas t h o u ~ h t o be about 800 f t . 1000 ft., and there tras no sound t h a t could be a t t r i S u t c d to due. to tile t w i l i g h t b u t t h e object. 'ihe color of the o b j e c t wes n o t a p ~ a r e n t dark c3ordwise e t r i p e s uere noticed undcr t h e wings. dix to e i z h t p a i r s of s o f t flouin~i c h t ~ l were noticed on the t s a i l i n p edge of the wing. 'IAe snecd was j u d ~ o dto bo about 3 0 0 400 nqh and the o b j e c t was on a headin? of a p r ) r o x b a t e l ~ - 10. 6° - (See Bnnendix I f o r possible r e l a t e d incident.) Broken clouda a t 17,000 f t . , v i s i b i l i t y five miles, wind S a t 5 nph. The n o s c i b i l i t y of this b i n ? a known a i r c r a f t w a s checked with negative re-mlts. The AC and ! Rariar E t a t i o n a t Kirtland U E did not observe any unusual ! o r unidontifiod a i r c r a f t . The -13's backnoun+?. was chcckod kind since he has a "Q clearance, i t bas been assun.jd that he ar>pwently is mentally s t a b l e . A investirmtion was m d e to C e t e d n e wl~ethero r n o t any one else had seen n the o b j e c t b u t only nerotive r e d t s uere obtained. Tho qhotopranhs r e f e r r e d to i n A?pendix I were s e n t tn the OSI a t Kirtlarid These >hotas vere shown t o the sources and they statvec? t h a t t i e ? h o b s resenblcd t ! .exhaust': o r l i ~ 9 ?attern of t h e object. d e k e k h , drawn by h: t the ob~lervera, i s shown i n this A?ncndix. AFi:. It i e i n t e r e s t i n ? to note ' t h a t a very sirsflar sighting took place in'iubbook, Texas. Tile exact tine anal d a k of the sight* could n o t be d e t e m h e d duo to the f a c t t h a t the observer bcliev.-.d she had seen an i l l u s i o n of sac t p and did n o t r e p o r t t h e incident. The only d a t e t h a t could be given vats " l a b in B w s t o r e a r l y Soptecber ' . None. The investi;.ation will 'cs cantinued until the authenticity of the photos i n Appcndlx I can bo de ternined.
  51. 51. C a v of Sketch r?satm b j Saurae
  52. 52. I. CISCUSSION OF TI!:; IIiCIijElPI' On 31 i.umst 1951 a t a p ~ r o x i ~ : t + ? l1245 CST two l a d i e s v e r 6 ' 6 r i v i q in an y autonobile ~ e v e r c n i l c s north of lintador, Texas. The o b j e c t wcs described os l a pear-shaped o b j e c t about the length of a B-29 f i s e l a f e , alur.htn o r s i l v e r in color, which r e a d i l y r e f l c c t c d tho sunlight. The o b j e c t k i d a p o r t o r sone type of apcrture In the aide and rboved throuph the a i r vi-J-i the - s U end forward. There was no s i p n of any exi-nust an6 no noise was heard. A s the tvo l a d i e s wcro d r i v i n c north f'ro11 l.Ietador, Texas, t h e d r i v e r of t h e -autonobi c f i r s t noticed the o b j e c t about 1% l yards ahend o f t h e autnnobile. They sto??ed and h t i l l a d i e s .rot o u t to obsenre t h e object. It w a s driftslowly in an e a s t w m l d i r e c t i o n a t a sr>eed they judged to ba ; l c a o than t h e speed required t take o f f i n a Oub a i r c r a f t ' and an d t i t ~ i d o about 120 f t , o of mved o u t of s i p h t i n t o ' Seconds l a t e r the objoct began t o asceni r a p i d l y tine uhci i n a circular a s c e n t . (%be w i n d a t thls the vao t'ran tE a t about 5-7 knots.) A backeround i m t e s t i p t i o n shoved t h a t both uorir.n ,ee :r of e x c e l l e n t charac tor. This i n c i d e n t i s of i n t e r e s t because it was observed d u r i n ~the sane period as t h e o b j e c t s over Lubboc:c, l e x a s (See A?pendix I). - - A. 1230 CST Reesa AF'B 31 Avpust 1951 Estinated c o i l i n c 6,000 f t . , broken clouds, with t h i n acatterod clouds a t -!5,000 ft.. V i s i b i l i t y 1 5 n i l e s . k l i n d EiZ a t 3 knots. B. 1230 CST C k d l d r e s s , Texas 31 A u p s t 1951 Estinatod coil* 25,000 ft., overcase. V i s i b i l i t y 1 5 miles. c&us clouds i n SL quadrant. Wind N% a t 7 k n o b . Tower* b - - It has been reported that a road reo& crew saw t h e sane o b j e c t later on t h e sane day. Attenrjta vill be made by P r o j e c t Cinxi~encrson-el t o contact nmbers of this road crew and obtain their s b t e n e n t s . There were also r e p o r t s of crop dustiqq a c t i v i t y in the area, so attcrrpts uil.l be &e to doternine whether or n o t the ladies could have seen t h i s a c t i v i t y ,

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