Doing	
  YouTube	
  in	
  a	
  Web	
  2.0	
  Video	
  World	
  
TODAY S	
  GAMEPLAN	
  
	
  	
  
1.	
  YouTube	
  Overview	
  
	
  	
  
2.	
  Copyright	
  issues	
  &	
  YouTube	
  
	
  ...
YouTube: A
brief overview
2005 (February) -- Founded by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen,
Jawid Karim
2006 (November) -- Google pay...
Some	
  YouTube	
  Stats	
  and	
  Figures	
  
-­‐ 	
  April	
  23,	
  2205:	
  First	
  YouTube	
  video	
  en1tled	
  Me...
Most	
  Viewed	
  YouTube	
  
Videos	
  of	
  All	
  Time	
  
(as	
  of	
  Jan.	
  9,	
  2011)	
  
	
  
h[p://www.readwrit...
YouTube	
  and	
  Copyright	
  Issues	
  
	
  
Digital	
  Millenium	
  Copyright	
  Act	
  (1998)	
  
	
  
(DMCA s)	
  saf...
SOPA – Stop Online Piracy Act
ü Under current practice, copyright owners such as TV networks
and Hollywood studios reach ...
Some	
  Quotes	
  on	
  Ongoing	
  Copyright	
  Ba[le	
  
The	
  entertainment	
  industry	
  wants	
  to	
  change	
  the...
Broadcast	
  Yourself:	
  Crea1ng	
  YourOwn	
  YouTube	
  Channel	
  
Homework	
  
	
  
READ:	
  
-­‐	
  Foust,	
  J.	
  Online	
  Journalism,	
  Chapters	
  8,	
  9	
  &	
  10	
  
	
  
WRITTE...
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Day3 youtubepdf

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Day3 youtubepdf

  1. 1. Doing  YouTube  in  a  Web  2.0  Video  World  
  2. 2. TODAY S  GAMEPLAN       1.  YouTube  Overview       2.  Copyright  issues  &  YouTube       3.  SeIng  up  a  YouTube  Channel:  How-­‐to       4.  Short  Interviews  of  classmates  with  Flip  Cams         5.  Uploading  Video  Content  to  YouTube  Channel         6.  Embed  YouTube  Interview  of  classmate  in  Wordpress   entry  and  post  live  to  web      
  3. 3. YouTube: A brief overview 2005 (February) -- Founded by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, Jawid Karim 2006 (November) -- Google pays $1.76 billion for YouTube (pays in Google stock) - 2 billion video views per day - 24 hours worth of video content uploaded every minute
  4. 4. Some  YouTube  Stats  and  Figures   -­‐   April  23,  2205:  First  YouTube  video  en1tled  Me  at  the  zoo,  shows   founder  Karim  at  the  San  Diego  Zoo.     -­‐ May  2010:  YouTube s  viewership  exceeds  that  of  all  three  TV   networks  combined  during  their  prime1me  evening  1me  slot,  with   more  than  2  billion  views  per  day     -­‐   May  2010:  YouTube  dominant  provider  of  online  video  in  United   States,  with  a  market  share  of  around  43%  and  more  than  14  billion   videos  viewed  in  May  2010.   -­‐   Average  user  spends  15  minutes  a  day  on  the  site.   -­‐  YouTube  interface  available  in  29  different  languages.   -­‐   Turkey  and  Morocco  among  countries  which  have  blocked  access   to  YouTube.     2009  UK  Guardian    descrip1on  of  users'  comments  on  YouTube     àJuvenile,  aggressive,  misspelled,  sexist,  homophobic,  swinging   from  raging  at  the  contents  of  a  video  to  providing  a  pointlessly   detailed  descrip1on  followed  by  a  LOL,  YouTube  comments  are  a   hotbed  of  infan1le  debate  and  unashamed  ignorance  –  with  the   occasional  burst  of  wit  shining  through.  
  5. 5. Most  Viewed  YouTube   Videos  of  All  Time   (as  of  Jan.  9,  2011)     h[p://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/ top_10_youtube_videos_of_all_^me.php    
  6. 6. YouTube  and  Copyright  Issues     Digital  Millenium  Copyright  Act  (1998)     (DMCA s)  safe-­‐harbor  protec^on  for  online  companies   -­‐   Copyright  holder s  responsibility  to  track  viola^ons,   not  online  company s   -­‐   Online  company  must  respond  expedi^ously  (or  risk   losing  safe  harbor  status)   -­‐   Poster/user  right  to  counter-­‐no^fica^on     -­‐   Too  many  indiscriminate  takedown  no^ces?   -­‐   Impossible  for  copyright  holders  to  be  specific  (total   numbers  of  uploads,  etc.)   -­‐   Over  the  last  five  years,  recording  industry  has  filed   more  than  30,000  lawsuits  against  individuals  who   allegedly  shared  copyrighted  songs  on  peer-­‐to-­‐peer   networks;  s^ll,  file-­‐sharing  remains  a  major  problem.   -­‐   Lenz v. Universal Music Corp.     KEY  ONGOING  LEGAL  BATTLE:  Viacom  v.  YouTube  –  Viacom   says  it  will  appeal  June  2010  ruling  in  favor  of  YouTube   safe-­‐ harbor  provisions  of  DMCA  as  currently  defined.    
  7. 7. SOPA – Stop Online Piracy Act ü Under current practice, copyright owners such as TV networks and Hollywood studios reach out to websites to request that pirated videos be taken down. Under [SOPA], they could ask banks, Internet service providers and domain name registrars to stop doing business with websites that they believed were devoted to piracy. They could, for instance, go straight to YouTube's domain registration company and demand that the entire YouTube website be taken down. And if the registrar resisted, the copyright owners would have the legal ability to take the registrar to court. ü The bill would also allow the Department of Justice, acting on behalf of aggrieved copyright holders, to perform domain name system filtering -- essentially, blocking entire websites in the name of preventing piracy. FOR SOPA: - Bose, CBS, Ford, MLB, NBA, NFL, Nike, Gibson, Peavey, Sony, Time Warner, Viacom, Wal-Mart, Warner Music Group AGAINST SOPA: - Google, Facebook, ebay, Yahoo, Twitter, AOL
  8. 8. Some  Quotes  on  Ongoing  Copyright  Ba[le   The  entertainment  industry  wants  to  change  the  law  to  protect   their  exis1ng  business  models.  rather  than  change  their  business   models  to  adapt  to  new  technology.   -­‐  Jonathan  Band,  a  Washington,  D.C.,  a=orney  for  NetCoaliBon,  an   advocacy  group  for  major  Internet  companies,  including  Google,   Yahoo  and  CNet.     There s  a  recurrent  paVern  whenever  a  new  technology  crops  up.   Exis1ng  content  industries  insist  that  the  new  technology  must  play   by  the  old  copyright  rules  ...  The  new  companies  say  that  the  old   rules  fit  your  technology  and  business  models,  but  they  don t  fit  our   technology  and  business  models.  Some1mes  the  older  companies   impose  restric1ons  that  try  to  stop  the  new  technology,  but  in  the   end,  the  old  and  new  companies  reach  some  compromise.   -­‐-­‐  Jessica  Litman,  Instructor  in  Copyright  Law,  University  of  Michigan   Law  School.     History  tells  us  that  unless  the  [copyright]  rules  will  accommodate   their  interests,  there  will  be  no  stability.  If  the  public  does  not  see   the  rules  as  legi1mate,  they  won t  obey  them.    -­‐-­‐  Jessica  Litman,  Instructor  in  Copyright  Law,  University  of  Michigan   Law  School.    
  9. 9. Broadcast  Yourself:  Crea1ng  YourOwn  YouTube  Channel  
  10. 10. Homework     READ:   -­‐  Foust,  J.  Online  Journalism,  Chapters  8,  9  &  10     WRITTEN  ASSIGNMENT     -­‐  Draf  due  of  Issue  story  No.  1  –  Bring  an  e-­‐copy  with  at   least  a  couple  of  pictures  on  Wed.,  Jan  18!    

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