What do I do now? Impact of the New Training
Program for Transformational Mentoring at the
University of Minnesota

Transf...
GOAL
Empower the student to become self-reflective
SUMMARY OF RESEARCH SO FAR…
Overall mentoring outcomes improve when:
Students are already seeking answers to big question...
WHAT EVENTS AND DEFINITIONS
IMPROVE RESULTS?

Number of
Mentors

Desired Activity


TransformationalMentoring.org

First ...
1

2

3

Numb
er of
Stude
nts

EFFECT OF
PREPARATION

4

5
Student Rating of Quality of
Help


TransformationalMentoring....
BASIS FOR THE MENTORING PROCESS
Sharon Daloz Parks’ three concepts of mentoring:
“ (1) becoming critically aware of one’s ...
SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT
Her criteria here is recognized as a process.

Self
Awareness
Participation in
Dial...
SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT
Her criteria here is recognized as a process.

Self
Awareness

Conversation
and Ref...
SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT
Her criteria here is recognized as a process.

Self
Awareness

Conversation
and Ref...
SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT
Curious and Caring

Trust

Self
Awareness

Conversation
and Reflection

Participati...
SO, WHAT DOES TRANSFORMATIONAL
MENTOR TRAINING LOOK LIKE?
GENERAL TRAINING PLAN
 What does mentoring mean to you? (20 min)
 Introduction to the mentoring process (15 min)
 Activ...
WHAT DOES MENTORING MEAN TO
YOU?
• Turn to a partner and spend five to seven
minutes talking about a mentor you’ve had
and...
ACTIVITY TO CREATE QUESTIONS FROM
STUDENT INFORMATION
 
Entry-Level Questions
 
1. What do you like to do in your
time out...
ACTIVITY TO ASK QUESTIONS AND PRACTICE
LISTENING
A Conversation`
Mentor: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
Student: I...
STUDENT PROFILE FOR
ENTREPRENEURSHIP FIELD EXPERIENCE
COURSE
• Please tell us a little about yourself.  Begin by
explainin...
STUDENT RESPONSE TO LAST QUESTION
I think something that I hope to accomplish after I
graduate is really making a differen...
EXERCISE BASED ON STRENGTHS AND SKILLS
At the beginning of the session mentors are
asked to list two or three strengths an...
PREPARATION FOR MEETINGS
Mentor preparation
 Research the student’s information
on application, Linked-In, reflective
wri...
STUDENT-MENTOR
INFORMATION MATCHING FORM
Step 1: Answer the following questions
1. In your experience, what is the most im...
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES AND SUBSEQUENT
TRAINING
• Periodic communications via email, newsletters,
phone calls are supportive ...
FEEDBACK FROM THE FOLLOW-ON
MENTOR MEETING
• “[The process] made them feel like they matter by
having their question make ...
TRAINING MATERIALS
 Student Goal Development survey
 Typical questions for starting discussions
 Strengths finder and o...
Problem solving skills
• Confidence
• Creativity (developing new ideas, thinking "outside the box")
• Anxiety (do you have...
GET TO KNOW YOU QUESTIONS
• Has there ever been a single experience that has changed
your life?
• Are you competitive?
• W...
MEANING MAKING QUESTIONS
 Why do you want the university experience, and why





this particular university?
What ar...
Both mentor and student agree:
• To provide regular feedback on how to improve the relationship and insure
meeting the stu...
MENTOR
POCKET
GUIDE

TransformationalMentoring.org
SOME FINAL THOUGHTS
 Initial matching should be considered carefully
 Training for conversation building is of great
imp...
AND….
“The present moment is the only time
over which we have dominion. The
most important person is always the
person you...
REFERENCES












Astin, H., & Astin, A. (1996). A Social Change Model of Leadership Development:
Guidebook....
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What do I do now? Impact of Training on Mentoring

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Full title: What do I do now? Impact of the New Training Program for Transformational Mentoring at the University of Minnesota by Ronald Frazzini, Ph.D. and Alexander Fink, Ph.D. Student.

This presentation was given at the 2013 University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Annual Conference.

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  • What do I do now? Impact of Training on Mentoring

    1. 1. What do I do now? Impact of the New Training Program for Transformational Mentoring at the University of Minnesota TransformationalMentoring.org Ron Frazzini, Ph.D. Alexander Fink, Ph.D. Student
    2. 2. GOAL Empower the student to become self-reflective
    3. 3. SUMMARY OF RESEARCH SO FAR… Overall mentoring outcomes improve when: Students are already seeking answers to big questions Meeting frequency is high Students are trained in their responsibility Both mentors and students prepare for the meetings Conversation questions are derived from student’s experience Training includes simulated conversations, and formulation of meaning-making questions Training includes subsequent feedback meetings  Fink, Alexander, Ronald Frazzini and John Speer, Creating a Mentor Training Program for Transformational Mentoring in the University of Minnesota Leadership Programs, TransformationalMentoring.org University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference, October, 2012
    4. 4. WHAT EVENTS AND DEFINITIONS IMPROVE RESULTS? Number of Mentors Desired Activity  TransformationalMentoring.org First Choice Second Choice Fink, Alexander, Ronald Frazzini and John Speer, Creating a Mentor Training Program for Transformational Mentoring in the University of Minnesota Leadership Programs, University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference, October, 2012
    5. 5. 1 2 3 Numb er of Stude nts EFFECT OF PREPARATION 4 5 Student Rating of Quality of Help  TransformationalMentoring.org Preparatio n No Prep Fink, Alexander, Ronald Frazzini and John Speer, Creating a Mentor Training Program for Transformational Mentoring in the University of Minnesota Leadership Programs, University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference, October, 2012
    6. 6. BASIS FOR THE MENTORING PROCESS Sharon Daloz Parks’ three concepts of mentoring: “ (1) becoming critically aware of one’s own composing of reality, (self awareness) (2) self-consciously participating in an ongoing dialogue toward truth, and (3) cultivating a capacity to respond—to act—in ways that are satisfying and just” …together define the basis for a mentor/student training program that enhances “transformational mentoring” Parks, S. D. (2000). Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, p. 20. TransformationalMentoring.org
    7. 7. SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT Her criteria here is recognized as a process. Self Awareness Participation in Dialogue about Truth Cultivating a Capacity to Respond, to Act Parks, S. D. (2000). Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, p. 20.
    8. 8. SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT Her criteria here is recognized as a process. Self Awareness Conversation and Reflection Participation in Dialogue about Truth Cultivating a Capacity to Respond, to Act Parks, S. D. (2000). Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, p. 20.
    9. 9. SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT Her criteria here is recognized as a process. Self Awareness Conversation and Reflection Participation in Dialogue about Truth Conversation and Reflection Parks, S. D. (2000). Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, p. 20. Cultivating a Capacity to Respond, to Act
    10. 10. SHARON PARKS' CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT Curious and Caring Trust Self Awareness Conversation and Reflection Participation in Dialogue about Truth Time
    11. 11. SO, WHAT DOES TRANSFORMATIONAL MENTOR TRAINING LOOK LIKE?
    12. 12. GENERAL TRAINING PLAN  What does mentoring mean to you? (20 min)  Introduction to the mentoring process (15 min)  Activity to create questions from student information (20 min)  Mentoring activity using personal strengths and skills(15 min)  Activity to ask questions and practice listening (30 min)  Preparation for meetings (10 min)  What resources exist for counseling if warranted? (10 min)  What are follow-up activities and subsequent training? (10 min)  Debrief of training activity (20 min) Results in a 2.5 hour training. TransformationalMentoring.org
    13. 13. WHAT DOES MENTORING MEAN TO YOU? • Turn to a partner and spend five to seven minutes talking about a mentor you’ve had and the impact of that experience. • Describe the impact the mentor had or if none, what was missing? TransformationalMentoring.org
    14. 14. ACTIVITY TO CREATE QUESTIONS FROM STUDENT INFORMATION   Entry-Level Questions   1. What do you like to do in your time outside of school? 2. What classes are you finding exciting? 3. Are you part of a club?   Deepening Questions     • • • • • 4. What are your strengths? 5 How do you define success? What do you like about being in the club? What is interesting or challenging to you about it? Where do you think your interest in being in this club came from? Do you see your strengths showing up in the club? How does your interest in this club connect to what you want to do with your major? Mentors work in pairs or threes to create specific questions for typical entry level questions.
    15. 15. ACTIVITY TO ASK QUESTIONS AND PRACTICE LISTENING A Conversation` Mentor: Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Student: I see myself in a company like 3M with a responsible job in the finance area. M: What in your vision does “responsible” mean and what does it entail in terms of your work? . . M: Well then how do you make that decision about “perfection”? Which of your personal values helps to draw the line on perfection? S: Hmmmm…I don’t know, but probably integrity, authenticity…How do YOU make that decision about when your work is “good enough”? Alternatives Can also talk about what “vision” is and why its important. You can then discuss what integrity and authenticity mean Conversation
    16. 16. STUDENT PROFILE FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP FIELD EXPERIENCE COURSE • Please tell us a little about yourself.  Begin by explaining who you are and what you are studying. • Afterward list your top five strengths, but also list what you think your top skills are, even if they seem contrary to what your strengths are.  • Finally we want to know a little about your ambitions. Tell us a little about what you are thinking of doing after you graduate.  Explain a little bit why you are taking this class, more so what you can learn from it to help you in your future.  TransformationalMentoring.org
    17. 17. STUDENT RESPONSE TO LAST QUESTION I think something that I hope to accomplish after I graduate is really making a difference in our society whether it be something on a large scale or small scale. I don’t know what I want to do to make a difference yet, but I just know that I want to do something to really better our community and give back. As for employment, I am hoping to do something where I am able to be analytical and develop a plan, so hopefully an analyst or financial planning…I am taking this class because I really enjoy the leadership minor program and the opportunities it gives you through hands on experience, and the ability to meet [and] work with so many other people. [I also want] to further develop myself as a leader and an individual.
    18. 18. EXERCISE BASED ON STRENGTHS AND SKILLS At the beginning of the session mentors are asked to list two or three strengths and the same number of skills Turn to a person next to you, take the list of two or three skills and strengths prepared earlier and connect two of them. • Describe one connection, or if there are none describe why. • TransformationalMentoring.org
    19. 19. PREPARATION FOR MEETINGS Mentor preparation  Research the student’s information on application, Linked-In, reflective writing or mentor matching form  Take strengths finder survey and look for shared strengths with student  Look for clues to meaningful questions as discussed in the training exercises  Study tools received in training  Remember the objective is for students to find answers for themselves TransformationalMentoring.org Student preparation  Attend a session defining mentor     program expectations Prepare questions prior to each meeting and send to mentor Take strengths finder survey and look for shared strengths with mentor Reflect on topics of discussion after each meeting Share “Big Questions” with the mentor
    20. 20. STUDENT-MENTOR INFORMATION MATCHING FORM Step 1: Answer the following questions 1. In your experience, what is the most important aspect of leadership? 2. How will this mentoring relationship help you to develop this important leadership characteristic? 3. Do you have other goals for this mentoring relationship?  4. Describe your scholastic major and future career objectives. 5. What leisure activities or hobbies do you enjoy? 6. How would a friend describe you? 7. Would you prefer being matched with a man or woman, or does it matter? 8. Are there any other characteristics or descriptions of yourself that you feel might be important in determining a good match? Step 2: Short biography TransformationalMentoring.org
    21. 21. FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES AND SUBSEQUENT TRAINING • Periodic communications via email, newsletters, phone calls are supportive of building a trusting relationship • Common social activities where several mentors and students participate enhances communication • Dyad meetings between students in the program enhances community • A training session one and a half months into the program that allows mentors to exchange ideas and problem solutions is beneficial TransformationalMentoring.org
    22. 22. FEEDBACK FROM THE FOLLOW-ON MENTOR MEETING • “[The process] made them feel like they matter by having their question make a difference.” • “The training helped with conversation. I don’t need to be the oracle, and that is freeing.” • “She doesn’t talk about these things to anyone else.” • Student claimed that “You’ve made connections I’ve never realized before.” And… • Because of cultural differences, “…she is reluctant to talk about things we’re not supposed to” TransformationalMentoring.org
    23. 23. TRAINING MATERIALS  Student Goal Development survey  Typical questions for starting discussions  Strengths finder and other self-assessment tools  Mentoring contract form  Mentor’s Pocket Guide to Transformational Mentoring TransformationalMentoring.org
    24. 24. Problem solving skills • Confidence • Creativity (developing new ideas, thinking "outside the box") • Anxiety (do you have the ability to control your anxiety) • Achievement (do you have the desire to achieve and be successful) • Relating to difficult personalities (overbearing, egoistic, pessimistic) • Minimizing ego • Morality, Ethics, & Integrity • Being taken seriously • Critical thinking (ability to comprehend and critically analyze things) • Initiative Leadership • Feel comfortable giving • The meaning of directions to a group leadership • Having a vision, purpose, • Developing  and personal goals "presence" as a leader • Development of trust and  integrity • Developing influence • Facilitation of a group • Ethical leadership  • Conflict management • Leadership and diversity • Global politics • Followership  Academic and Career • Choosing a major  • Clarifying school and career goals • Extra curricular involvement  • Development of a personal work ethic • Relationships with co-workers, fellow students  • Gender differences (power, relationships) • Sexual harassment • Cross-cultural communication Student Goals Survey TransformationalMentoring.org Interpersonal Skills Problem Solving Skills Leadership Skills Academic and Career Appreciating the Arts Spirituality Physical Well-Being
    25. 25. GET TO KNOW YOU QUESTIONS • Has there ever been a single experience that has changed your life? • Are you competitive? • What country are you from? What countries have you visited? What struck you as most interesting about these travels? Would you ever want to live somewhere else? • What is your motto? • Who/what type of person do you respect the most? • Who/what has had the most influence on you in your life? • Do you have a life goal? • What do you feel passionate about? Simple questions that • What is your favorite book/movie/play? Why? • What are your strengths and weaknesses? start a one-on-one or • What is your leadership style? mentoring session • How do you define success? • Who do you look up to? • What do you value? • If you had to live your life over again, what would you change? • Describe your vision of what the perfect future would be? How would you get there? TransformationalMentoring.org
    26. 26. MEANING MAKING QUESTIONS  Why do you want the university experience, and why     this particular university? What are your interests and passions, and how do they reflect in your classes or extra curricular activities? What might you do to make your life more satisfying at this very moment?* What is your vision of the best way to live your life right now?* How do you think this vision will extend into your life after college and into the workforce? *Nash, Robert and Michele Murray, Helping College Students Find Purpose,” San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2010 TransformationalMentoring.org
    27. 27. Both mentor and student agree: • To provide regular feedback on how to improve the relationship and insure meeting the students goals. • That the discussion topics and goals of the mentoring shall be primarily chosen by the student and every effort should be made to have the meetings student led. • To review the students completion of the goal development survey at our first meeting and discuss goal setting for the mentoring relationship • The focus is on developing a process whereby the student can find the answers for themselves. • This relationship is completely voluntary and may be ended at any time by either party. • The relationship may be extended by mutual agreement of both parties. • The information shared in these meetings is strictly confidential. • To meet frequently with a total meeting time of approximately 4 hours per month. • Our first meeting will occur on the following date and time in the following location. Date_____________ Time___________ Location___________ • We will attempt to meet regularly on the following schedule__________________________________________ An Agreement Regular feedback Student led Establish goals and Outcomes Voluntary relationship Confidential Meeting logistics • To give these meetings a priority and honor commitments. • To prepare for these meetings and communicate topics prior to each meeting (student should e-mail topics and questions to mentor prior to meeting). • To utilize different venues when appropriate to foster discussion. • To mutually share expenses unless a different pre arrangement is made. • To reflect on the topics of discussion after each meeting. _______________________ _______________________ Mentors signature and date Mentees signature and date Reflection and Planning
    28. 28. MENTOR POCKET GUIDE TransformationalMentoring.org
    29. 29. SOME FINAL THOUGHTS  Initial matching should be considered carefully  Training for conversation building is of great importance  For long-term mentoring, follow-up training, collaboration with other mentors and periodic communication and conversations are essential.  Partnership with other organizations for training is a challenge to provide an integrated approach.  Conducting research on this kind of mentoring and efficacy is difficult! Any thoughts? TransformationalMentoring.org
    30. 30. AND…. “The present moment is the only time over which we have dominion. The most important person is always the person you are with, who is right before you, for who knows if you will have dealings with any other person in the future?” Tich Nhat Hanh, The Miracle of Mindfulness, Boston: Beacon Press,1987
    31. 31. REFERENCES          Astin, H., & Astin, A. (1996). A Social Change Model of Leadership Development: Guidebook. Los Angeles: University of California Education Research Institute. Astin, A. W., Astin, H. S., & Lindholm, J. A. (2011). Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students' Inner Lives. Jossey-Bass. Co-Curricular Leadership Programs. http://www.leadup.umn.edu/first-year/index.html. Referenced June 10, 2012. Frazzini, R., & Fink, A. (2011). “Transformational Mentoring in University of Minnesota Co-Curricular Leadership Programs.” University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference, October, 2011. Fink, Alexander, Ronald Frazzini and John Speer, Creating a Mentor Training Program for Transformational Mentoring in the University of Minnesota Leadership Programs, University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute Conference, October, 2012 Mezirow, J. (2000). Learning as transformation: Critical perspectives on a theory in progress. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Nash, Robert and Michele Murray, Helping College Students Find Purpose, San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2010 Parks, S. D. (2000). Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Transformational Mentoring Website: http://transformationalmentoring.org

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