FACTORS AND STRATEGIESTHAT IMPACT ONLINECOMMUNITY COLLEGESTUDENT PERSISTENCE  Jennifer Boisvert, Pamela Culbertson,       ...
ISSUES AND CONTEXTQuestion:After three years what % of first time community  college students complete a credential of any...
ISSUES “…if success is based on the outcomes of all  entrants, performance will be depressed unless  success is very broa...
ISSUESAll that said… After 3 years just 16% of first-time community  college students who began college in 2003  attained...
WHY IS THIS SO? With a partner create a list of the top 3 reasons  community college students do not finish a  degree or ...
ADDED CONTEXT: NO RESEARCHREALLY   One area that is popularly discussed but not    addressed here (because of the dearth ...
OVERVIEW Definitions Research Questions Review of Literature Limitations Conclusion
RESEARCH SPECIFICATIONS   Time Period       2004-2011   Keywords       Attrition, online, persistence, community colle...
DEFINITIONS   Persistence:       Students returning for future courses   Retention:       Students completing a course...
PROBLEM   Lack of research in relation to online community    college student persistence   Limited research regarding o...
RESEARCH QUESTIONS   What are the factors that impact online    community college student persistence?   What strategies...
SUNY COMMUNITY COLLEGEShttp://nyshei.wordpress.com/2008/02/02/suny-caucus-forms/
FACTORS IDENTIFIED   Student Engagement in Online Courses     Instructor and Course Designer Influence     Learning Com...
FACTORS INFLUENCING COMMUNITYCOLLEGE ONLINE COURSEPERSISTENCE   Push Effects     Self-Efficacy     Time Management    ...
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT   Instructor and Course Designer Influence     Academic Support     Social Support   Learning Commu...
FINANCIAL AND MAJOR SELECTIONINFLUENCES   Finance-Related Effects     Increase in Local Employment Opportunities       ...
LIMITATIONS Small Sample Sizes Unknown Duration of Online Courses Preparation     Tutorials     Self-Assessment Surve...
CONCLUSION   Limited Research on Online Persistence:     Community Colleges     SUNY Community Colleges   More Researc...
CONTACT INFORMATION Jen   Boisvert     jennifer.boisvert@gmail.com Pam   Culbertson     pamela.culbertson01@albany.edu
RESOURCESAllen, J., & Robbins, S.B. (2008). Prediction of college major persistence   based on vocational interests, acade...
RESOURCES CONT’DDodge, T. M., Mitchell, M.F., & Mensch, J.M. (2009). Student retention in  athletic training education pro...
RESOURCES CONT’DKienzl, G. S., Alfonso, M., & Melguizo, T. (2007). The effect of local labor   market conditions in the 19...
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Factors & Strategies that impact online CC student persistence,

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SLN Campus Research Engagement Program http://wiki.sln.suny.edu/display/SLNED/Current+Research+Projects

Study of Online Student Persistence in SUNY

Research proposal problem statement:
SUNY's DOODLE group has conducted a multi-year study of student persistence, attrition, and success with online courses. Overall, the rates of attrition are similar among the DOODLE institutions as are success rates which is interesting in itself given the institutions are often quite different in size, number of courses offered online, and in demographic make-up. SUNY and its DE faculty often consider the attrition rate outcomes to be high, and indeed, compared to research such as the National Community College Benchmark study, SUNY's rates are high - typically 5% or greater in similar categories of measurement (higher attrition = not a favorable outcome). In other words, SUNY looks normative compared 'to itself' and appears as an underperformer when compared to aggregate institutions participating in the NCCB study. (DOODLE has less than 20 institutions participating in its persistence study; NCCB has over 200.) While the reasons for such a gap may be simple, such as survey criteria being different, explaining the phenomenon is important as SUNY faculty look at 'national' outcomes and deduce (perhaps quite incorrectly) that SUNY (and their own SUNY college) are doing a bad job of both attracting and keeping students in online courses toward successful outcomes.

* The affected population are SUNY students enrolled in online and blended courses.
* The target 'population' are SUNY colleges and university centers who are members of Directors of Online and Distance Learning (DOODLE) and also any SUNY institutions that become members of DOODLE. (All offer fully online and/or blended modalities of mediated teaching and learning at course and/or program levels to enrolled students, typically using a commercial or open-source CMS/LMS platform)

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Factors & Strategies that impact online CC student persistence,

  1. 1. FACTORS AND STRATEGIESTHAT IMPACT ONLINECOMMUNITY COLLEGESTUDENT PERSISTENCE Jennifer Boisvert, Pamela Culbertson, Peter Shea, PhD May 24, 2011 The University at Albany, State University of New York
  2. 2. ISSUES AND CONTEXTQuestion:After three years what % of first time community college students complete a credential of any sort? A) 25% (i.e. 75% do not finish on time) B) 35% (i.e. 65% do not finish on time) C) 50% (i.e. 50% do not finish on time) D) Other
  3. 3. ISSUES “…if success is based on the outcomes of all entrants, performance will be depressed unless success is very broadly defined.” “By the same token, measuring success only for a select group (e.g., those who indicate degree intentions or achieve credit thresholds) may produce a falsely positive appearance of success while also encouraging access to diminish (e.g., through creaming).”  Goldrick-Rab, 2010
  4. 4. ISSUESAll that said… After 3 years just 16% of first-time community college students who began college in 2003 attained a credential of any kind (certificate, associate’s degree, and/or bachelor’s degree). So 84% of first time cc students do not finish on time After 6 years the number without a credential of any sort is still 64%.  Goldrick-Rab, 2010
  5. 5. WHY IS THIS SO? With a partner create a list of the top 3 reasons community college students do not finish a degree or certificate program. What are the top 3 solutions to these problems?
  6. 6. ADDED CONTEXT: NO RESEARCHREALLY One area that is popularly discussed but not addressed here (because of the dearth of research in the public 2-year sector) is the potential for online solutions (for more, see U.S. Department of Education, 2009).  Goldrick-Rab, 2010
  7. 7. OVERVIEW Definitions Research Questions Review of Literature Limitations Conclusion
  8. 8. RESEARCH SPECIFICATIONS Time Period  2004-2011 Keywords  Attrition, online, persistence, community college, leaving early, retention, drop out, student engagement, gender, ethnicity, major, and SUNY Learning Network Resources  The University at Albany’s online library resources database  Peer-reviewed articles
  9. 9. DEFINITIONS Persistence:  Students returning for future courses Retention:  Students completing a course in which they enrolled
  10. 10. PROBLEM Lack of research in relation to online community college student persistence Limited research regarding online learners enrolled in SUNY community colleges
  11. 11. RESEARCH QUESTIONS What are the factors that impact online community college student persistence? What strategies can community college professionals implement to increase student persistence? How does a sample of community colleges within the State University of New York compare to national norms for persistence in online education?
  12. 12. SUNY COMMUNITY COLLEGEShttp://nyshei.wordpress.com/2008/02/02/suny-caucus-forms/
  13. 13. FACTORS IDENTIFIED Student Engagement in Online Courses  Instructor and Course Designer Influence  Learning Communities  Online Class Community Support Finance-Related Effects on Persistence Importance of Interest – College Major Selection
  14. 14. FACTORS INFLUENCING COMMUNITYCOLLEGE ONLINE COURSEPERSISTENCE Push Effects  Self-Efficacy  Time Management  Engagement  Motivation Pull Effects  Financial Struggles  Family and Personal Obligations  Work Demands
  15. 15. STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Instructor and Course Designer Influence  Academic Support  Social Support Learning Communities  Groups of Students  Benefits  4-Year Longitudinal Study (Engstrom & Tinto, 2008) Online Class Community Support  Technology  Sense of Community  Communication  Introductory Computer Course
  16. 16. FINANCIAL AND MAJOR SELECTIONINFLUENCES Finance-Related Effects  Increase in Local Employment Opportunities  Decrease in Community College Persistence  Access to Student Loans  Increase in Persistence  Student Loan Availability  Students Receiving Aid in 2008-2009 (AACC) Importance of Interest – College Major Selection  Person-Environment Fit  Community of Inquiry (CoI)  Increased Motivation  Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Majors
  17. 17. LIMITATIONS Small Sample Sizes Unknown Duration of Online Courses Preparation  Tutorials  Self-Assessment Survey Intent – Required or Elective Courses Unknown Delivery Method  Percentage Online – Full, Blended
  18. 18. CONCLUSION Limited Research on Online Persistence:  Community Colleges  SUNY Community Colleges More Research Needed on:  Student Engagement  Learner Fit Implementation Strategies  Clubs/Organizations  Learning Communities
  19. 19. CONTACT INFORMATION Jen Boisvert  jennifer.boisvert@gmail.com Pam Culbertson  pamela.culbertson01@albany.edu
  20. 20. RESOURCESAllen, J., & Robbins, S.B. (2008). Prediction of college major persistence based on vocational interests, academic preparation, and first-year academic performance. Research in Higher Education, 49(1), 62-79.American Association of Community Colleges. (n.d.). Fast Facts. Retrieved April 17, 2011, from http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Pages/fastfacts.aspxAragon, S. R., & Johnson, E. S. (2008). Factors influencing completion and noncompletion of community college online courses. The American Journal of Distance Education, 22(3), 146-158.Artino, A. R. (2007). Online military training: Using a social cognitive view of motivation and self-regulation to understand students’ satisfaction, perceived learning, and choice. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 8(3), 191-202.Barbatis, P. (2010). Underprepared, ethnically diverse community college students: Factors contributing to persistence. Journal of Developmental Education, 33(3), 14-24.Barnes, R. A., & Piland, W.E. (2010-2011). Impact of learning communities in developmental English on community college student retention and persistence. Journal of College Student Retention, 12(1), 7-24.
  21. 21. RESOURCES CONT’DDodge, T. M., Mitchell, M.F., & Mensch, J.M. (2009). Student retention in athletic training education programs. Journal of Athletic Training, 44(2), 197-207.Dowd, A. C. (2004). Income and financial aid effects on persistence and degree attainment in public colleges. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 12(21), 33.Engstrom, C, & Tinto, V. (2008). Access without support is not opportunity. Change, 4(1), 46-50.Fike, D. S., & Fike, R. (2008). Predictors of first-year student retention in the community college. Community College Review, 36(2), 68-88.Goldrick-Rab, S. (2010). Challenges and opportunities for improving community college student success. Review of Educational Research, 80(3), 437-469.Griffith, A.L. (2010). Persistence of women and minorities in STEM field majors: Is it the school that matters?. Economics of Education Review, 29(6), 911-922.
  22. 22. RESOURCES CONT’DKienzl, G. S., Alfonso, M., & Melguizo, T. (2007). The effect of local labor market conditions in the 1990s on the likelihood of community college students’ persistence and attainment. Research in Higher Education, 48(7), 751-774.Lehr, C. A., Clapper, A. T., & Thurlow, M. L. (2005). Graduation for all: A practical guide to decreasing school dropout. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.Morris, L. K., & Daniel, L. G. (2008). Perceptions of a chilly climate: Differences in traditional and non-traditional majors for women. Research in Higher Education, 49(3), 256-273.New York State Higher Education Initiative. (2008, February 2). SUNY caucus forms. Messaged posted to http://nyshei.wordpress.com/2008/02/02/suny-caucus-forms/Shea, P. & Bidjerano, T. (2010). Towards a theory of self-efficacy, self- regulation, and the development of a communities of inquiry in online and blended learning environments. Computers & Education, 55(4), 1721- 1731.

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