Opportunity
Has a (Secret)
   Knock.
The secret is...
 Most people see the news
 media as something to be
feared or tolerated, not as a
    golden opportunity.
Strategies
 for working
   with the
news media.
Presented by



   Alex
Greenwood
20        Years
of experience in news
media, public relations
    and marketing.
Public relations is a profession that
 ethically identifies, develops and
creates strategies to communicate
  the key mess...
P.R. is not...
Propaganda
Advertising
Marketing
P.R. Professionals
      are...
Writers/Editors
Spokespersons
Speechwriters
Strategic Planners
Media Relations Experts
Media Relations
?
  Who are these Media
people and what do they
    want, anyway?
What is News ?
Timely and
  relevant
information
Often contains
conflict and drama
Consists of notable or
 unusual happenings
Scoop
Is of general interest to
 a particular audience
The News
  Media
Newspapers
Local or National Magazines
Trade Publications
Radio News/Talk shows
Online News Sites
More than 200,000,000
Podcasts
Media Roles/Needs
Inform
Need to create a
compelling story
Sell publication
    or story
Act as a catalyst
  for change.
Write a first draft
   of history.
Bring consumers
 and producers
    together
?
What do they want?
Content is...
They need ratings
They need to
sell papers.
Text




Website impressions
and unique visitors
Truth
 Facts
Truth is subjective, sadly so are facts in some cases these days.
Look good, sound good...




 ...and never let’em see you sweat.
So, what to do
First and foremost...an interview
       with the media is an
   opportunity that you should
          rare...
Let’s pretend you’ve been asked
by your local newspaper to give
an interview at your office about
your company’s new servi...
Congrats!
An opportunity
Remember:
Advertising can raise awareness, but
   good public relations can earn
             credibility.
 (Instead of bu...
Be
Prepared
Ask the reporter
what their angle is
  for the story?
Action Steps
 before the
  interview
Hold your horses!
Ask if the reporter is
    on deadline
Take time to prep with
  your PR person or
    project team.
Brainstorm
Identify



3 KEY
POINTS
Questions
Anticipated and ones you
       hope to get.
Make your answers into
  good sound bites.
?
What is a sound bite?
Sounds bites are clear,
concise, conversational,
catchy sentences that a
reporter can quote.
If they’re good, they can
 shape the entire story.

Develop three good ones
   and rehearse them
 enough that they don’t
 ...
Hallmarks of a

Good Bite.
Sizzle, not
Humor is
 good...

            Use
           Caution
Absolutes, action words
   and analogies are
 absolutely good ideas.
Keep the hyperbole
  to a minimum.
The Three P’s
  Presentable.
    Positive.
  Professional.
Be Presentable

 Look your best. That includes
personal hygiene and grooming.
Make the interview
 site presentable
Be Positive
                  Upbeat
                Pleasant

It’s tougher to write bad things about nice people.
Be Professional
The reporter has a job
  to do, so do you.
Avoid
“Off the record”
    remarks.
Brevity is the mother
 of great coverage.
Get those
Sound bites in.
Wrapping up the
   interview
A brief interview is a
     good thing.
Watch out for the “Is there anything I
forgot to ask?” ask. This can lead to
inadvertent introduction of negatives
     or...
Short-sheet the reporter.
  Leave a page of clear, easy to read
facts, bullet points and references for
 them to use later...
A few No-No’s...
Never ask the reporter to
“approve” their story. This is tacky
and makes you look bush league.
Don’t assume it’s
   over until you’re out
      of the room.
  Everything you say is on the record--
    including follow...
Send a note...
Errors and corrections

Never threaten. Call the reporter first.
Editors are reasonable when you are.
Check out our
  “Beyond the
    Basics”
    Seminar
Get the full monty! Go in-depth
 with tips on what to do when
    thin...
Visit our website for more details
        about our services.
Sign up for our PR Tips Newsletter and Read
       our AlexanderG Whiz Blog at:

            www.AlexGPR.com




       Tw...
Media Training: Opportunity Has a Secret Knock
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Media Training: Opportunity Has a Secret Knock

3,397 views

Published on

Learning the “secret knock” to the door of opportunity is key when dealing with today’s news media. Check out this brief presentation to learn tips and strategies to get the most out of your interview opportunities. Contact us to schedule your media training or to learn ways to make your Slideshare presentation more effective.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,397
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,004
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
67
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide




  • 20 Years Experience in News Media, Public Relations & Marketing
    Former Newspaper Reporter & Editor
    Former Radio Talk Show Host
    Former Vice President of Public Affairs for Kansas City Public Television
  • 20 Years Experience in News Media, Public Relations & Marketing
  • Public relations is a profession that ethically identifies, develops and creates strategies to communicate the key messages of the client.
  • Propaganda
    Advertising
    Marketing



  • Writers/Editors
    Spokespersons
    Speechwriters
    Strategic Planners
    Media Relations Experts







  • News is timely and relevant info
    Often contains conflict and drama
    Consists of notable/unusual happenings
    Is of general interest to a particular audience
    A scoop





  • Newspapers
    Magazines
    Trade Publications
    Local Television News
    National Television News
    Radio News/Talk shows
    Online News Website
    Web Blogs -- Blogs
    Podcasts







  • Inform their audience
    Create a compelling story
    Sell publication/story
    Act as a catlyst for change
    Write first draft of history
    Bring together consumers and producers
  • inform their audience
  • Create a compelling story
  • Create a compelling story

  • write a first draft of history

  • Content (is king)
    Ratings
    Circulation
    Hits/Visitors
    Truth/Facts



  • Impressions and unique visitors



  • I cover TV interviews, radio, etc. in the Full Monty.

  • Some may say that “Marketing pays for placement, PR positions for placement.”

  • Ask the reporter what their “angle” is for the story.
  • Hold your horses.
    Prep with your PR person or project team.
    Brainstorm.
    Identify THREE key message points.
    Questions anticipated.
    Questions you hope to get.
  • Hold your horses

  • Brainstorm
  • Identify 3 Key message points
  • Also ask if they are on deadline. If they are 10 minutes from deadline, you still need time to prepare, so tell them you will call back in 5. Don’t get caught off guard.
    Key message points should be clear, strong and positive. Work them into every answer to every question possible. Use everyday words. NO LINGO. Even if the reporter seems to understand what your jargon/lingo is, their audience probably doesn’t. Exception: trade publications.
  • Also ask if they are on deadline. If they are 10 minutes from deadline, you still need time to prepare, so tell them you will call back in 5. Don’t get caught off guard.
    Key message points should be clear, strong and positive. Work them into every answer to every question possible. Use everyday words. NO LINGO. Even if the reporter seems to understand what your jargon/lingo is, their audience probably doesn’t. Exception: trade publications.



  • Interviews are like a dance someone has to lead” “Do you have any questions for my answers?” Using examples analogous to everyday life is very effective. Ask yourself...if you were reading this story what would you say that would answer “What’s in it for me?” Find ways to bridge the reporter’s question back to one of your three key messages. Example: “Do you believe sustainable architecture is worth the financial costs?” You could answer” “The real issue, Dave, is quality of life. Sustainability for people like the folks in Greensboro is more than just rebuilding their town, it’s about giving them a community worth of their will to rebuild. You can’t put a price on that.”
  • Sizzle, not steak.
    Humor is good, but be careful.
    Absolutes, action words and analogies are absolutely good ideas.
    If the cliche’ ain’t broke...
    Keep the hyperbole to a minimum.
    They already have the facts, usually. They look to you for the human factor.
    Analogies: “Men are like buses, there’s always another one coming along.” or “Life is like a box of chocolates.”
    Cliche’s work-- “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”
    Action words: destroy, decimated, accelerating, swatting, etc. Use only when it truly enhances your key points.
    Absolutes work: “Read my lips, no new taxes!”
    “Go ahead, make my day,”
    Watch out for exaggerations. “80,000 people here at Riverfest!”
    Also remember--the closing thing you will get to controlling an interview is having good information and juicy soundbites. I have been in situations where a good soundbite has changed the tenor of an interview. Nurisng home--”We are terribly worried about him and appreciate you helping us get the word out to the public so they may help us find him.”

  • Humor is good, but be careful


  • The other ‘P’ was Prepared, as in Be Prepared, remember?
  • Now back to our newspaper interview...
    Look your best. That includes personal hygiene and grooming.
    Make the interview site is presentable with few distractions.
  • A dirty office is a distraction. Unruly people nearby is also a bad distraction.

  • It’s tougher to write bad things about nice people.
  • The reporter has a job to do, and so do you.
    Avoid “off the record” remarks.
    Brevity is the mother of great coverage.
    Get those sound bites in!

  • Avoid “off the record” remarks.



  • A brief interview is a good thing.
    Watch out for the “Is there anything I forgot to ask?” ask.
    Short-sheet the reporter.






  • Don’t ask the reporter if you can approve the story before it is published.
    Don’t assume that because you’re walking to the door, the interview is over.
    Jimmy Carter made this mistake--PLAYBOY INTERVIEW: In an interview published in the November 1976 issue of Playboy magazine, then-Governor Carter talked about the role of religion in his life. It was the last of several interviews, and as he walked the reporter to the door he said:
    " I try not to commit a deliberate sin. I recognize that I'm going to do it anyhow, because I'm human and I'm tempted. And Christ set some almost impossible standards for us. Christ said, 'I tell you that anyone who looks on a woman with lust has in his heart already committed adultery.'
    "I've looked on a lot of women with lust. I've committed adultery in my heart many times. This is something that God recognizes I will do--and I have done it--and God forgives me for it."
    He went down 17 points in the polls.



  • Never threaten. Call the reporter first. Editors are reasonable when you are.

  • If you want to learn more, including in-depth scenarios and training...you’ll want The Full Monty. It’s a great movie, too.


  • Media Training: Opportunity Has a Secret Knock

    1. 1. Opportunity Has a (Secret) Knock.
    2. 2. The secret is... Most people see the news media as something to be feared or tolerated, not as a golden opportunity.
    3. 3. Strategies for working with the news media.
    4. 4. Presented by Alex Greenwood
    5. 5. 20 Years of experience in news media, public relations and marketing.
    6. 6. Public relations is a profession that ethically identifies, develops and creates strategies to communicate the key messages of the client.
    7. 7. P.R. is not...
    8. 8. Propaganda
    9. 9. Advertising
    10. 10. Marketing
    11. 11. P.R. Professionals are...
    12. 12. Writers/Editors
    13. 13. Spokespersons
    14. 14. Speechwriters
    15. 15. Strategic Planners
    16. 16. Media Relations Experts
    17. 17. Media Relations
    18. 18. ? Who are these Media people and what do they want, anyway?
    19. 19. What is News ?
    20. 20. Timely and relevant information
    21. 21. Often contains conflict and drama
    22. 22. Consists of notable or unusual happenings
    23. 23. Scoop
    24. 24. Is of general interest to a particular audience
    25. 25. The News Media
    26. 26. Newspapers
    27. 27. Local or National Magazines
    28. 28. Trade Publications
    29. 29. Radio News/Talk shows
    30. 30. Online News Sites
    31. 31. More than 200,000,000
    32. 32. Podcasts
    33. 33. Media Roles/Needs
    34. 34. Inform
    35. 35. Need to create a compelling story
    36. 36. Sell publication or story
    37. 37. Act as a catalyst for change.
    38. 38. Write a first draft of history.
    39. 39. Bring consumers and producers together
    40. 40. ? What do they want?
    41. 41. Content is...
    42. 42. They need ratings
    43. 43. They need to sell papers.
    44. 44. Text Website impressions and unique visitors
    45. 45. Truth Facts Truth is subjective, sadly so are facts in some cases these days.
    46. 46. Look good, sound good... ...and never let’em see you sweat.
    47. 47. So, what to do First and foremost...an interview with the media is an opportunity that you should rarely pass up.
    48. 48. Let’s pretend you’ve been asked by your local newspaper to give an interview at your office about your company’s new service.
    49. 49. Congrats! An opportunity
    50. 50. Remember: Advertising can raise awareness, but good public relations can earn credibility. (Instead of buying an ad and saying how great you are, you have a newspaper implying it--if you manage to tell your story correctly.)
    51. 51. Be Prepared
    52. 52. Ask the reporter what their angle is for the story?
    53. 53. Action Steps before the interview
    54. 54. Hold your horses! Ask if the reporter is on deadline
    55. 55. Take time to prep with your PR person or project team.
    56. 56. Brainstorm
    57. 57. Identify 3 KEY POINTS
    58. 58. Questions Anticipated and ones you hope to get.
    59. 59. Make your answers into good sound bites.
    60. 60. ? What is a sound bite?
    61. 61. Sounds bites are clear, concise, conversational, catchy sentences that a reporter can quote.
    62. 62. If they’re good, they can shape the entire story. Develop three good ones and rehearse them enough that they don’t sound rehearsed.
    63. 63. Hallmarks of a Good Bite.
    64. 64. Sizzle, not
    65. 65. Humor is good... Use Caution
    66. 66. Absolutes, action words and analogies are absolutely good ideas.
    67. 67. Keep the hyperbole to a minimum.
    68. 68. The Three P’s Presentable. Positive. Professional.
    69. 69. Be Presentable Look your best. That includes personal hygiene and grooming.
    70. 70. Make the interview site presentable
    71. 71. Be Positive Upbeat Pleasant It’s tougher to write bad things about nice people.
    72. 72. Be Professional
    73. 73. The reporter has a job to do, so do you.
    74. 74. Avoid “Off the record” remarks.
    75. 75. Brevity is the mother of great coverage.
    76. 76. Get those Sound bites in.
    77. 77. Wrapping up the interview
    78. 78. A brief interview is a good thing.
    79. 79. Watch out for the “Is there anything I forgot to ask?” ask. This can lead to inadvertent introduction of negatives or temptation to be funny.
    80. 80. Short-sheet the reporter. Leave a page of clear, easy to read facts, bullet points and references for them to use later when putting their story together. This can also be a PDF online--but make sure you print a copy and give it to the reporter. Leave nothing to chance.
    81. 81. A few No-No’s...
    82. 82. Never ask the reporter to “approve” their story. This is tacky and makes you look bush league.
    83. 83. Don’t assume it’s over until you’re out of the room. Everything you say is on the record-- including follow-up calls to verify information. Don’t say something “juicy” and expect the reporter not to use it.
    84. 84. Send a note...
    85. 85. Errors and corrections Never threaten. Call the reporter first. Editors are reasonable when you are.
    86. 86. Check out our “Beyond the Basics” Seminar Get the full monty! Go in-depth with tips on what to do when things go wrong, crisis communications strategies and actual hands-on practice.
    87. 87. Visit our website for more details about our services.
    88. 88. Sign up for our PR Tips Newsletter and Read our AlexanderG Whiz Blog at: www.AlexGPR.com Twitter: @A_Greenwood

    ×