Cultivating   Student Leaders Through Campus Partnerships Presenters:  Amas Aduviri, Wendy Alemán,  Josh Ashcroft, Rocio G...
Program Overview <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>History of our CAMP grant </li></ul><ul><li>Key points to our col...
History of Our Grant <ul><li>How the MCI program was included in the grant </li></ul><ul><li>Year 3 of our 5 year grant </...
Keys to a Successful Partnership <ul><li>Regular monthly meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative hiring and training proc...
Details of the MCI Program <ul><li>Purpose of the MCI program  </li></ul><ul><li>Role/Expectations of the MCI Position </l...
Theory <ul><li>What is Theory? </li></ul><ul><li>It is a way of organizing thoughts to be true about college students into...
Student Development Theory <ul><li>Useful theories for student retention and development: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schlossber...
Transition Theory <ul><li>Nancy Schlossberg’s Transition Theory  (1981)-  </li></ul><ul><li>A transition is defined as any...
<ul><li>Factors that influence a person’s ability to handle the transition: </li></ul><ul><li>Situation:  trigger, timing,...
Mattering vs. Marginality <ul><li>Schlossberg’s Mattering vs. Marginality, (1989) </li></ul><ul><li>Mattering —belief that...
Involvement Theory Astin (1984) Involvement theory -  Involvement is the amount of physical and psychological energy that ...
Challenge and Support <ul><li>Sanford’s Challenge and Support Theory, (1966) </li></ul><ul><li>A student’s success is depe...
Limitations of Theory <ul><li>Looking at theory as possibly fact puts students in a “small box” not recognizing their live...
Student Perspective: Rocio Garcia <ul><li>How I learned of the MCI program </li></ul><ul><li>Interview; training </li></ul...
Cultivating Student Leaders <ul><li>What MCI’s are doing now? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6 out of 8 in leadership positions </l...
Questions?
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  1. 1. Cultivating Student Leaders Through Campus Partnerships Presenters: Amas Aduviri, Wendy Alemán, Josh Ashcroft, Rocio Garcia, The Multicultural Community Intern Program
  2. 2. Program Overview <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>History of our CAMP grant </li></ul><ul><li>Key points to our collaborative partnership </li></ul><ul><li>Details of the MCI Program </li></ul><ul><li>Student development theory </li></ul><ul><li>Student story and types of programming </li></ul><ul><li>Time for questions and answers </li></ul>
  3. 3. History of Our Grant <ul><li>How the MCI program was included in the grant </li></ul><ul><li>Year 3 of our 5 year grant </li></ul><ul><li>Number of students at OSU CAMP </li></ul>
  4. 4. Keys to a Successful Partnership <ul><li>Regular monthly meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative hiring and training processes </li></ul><ul><li>Shared vision for advancement of program goals and student success </li></ul>
  5. 5. Details of the MCI Program <ul><li>Purpose of the MCI program </li></ul><ul><li>Role/Expectations of the MCI Position </li></ul><ul><li>Number of students involved </li></ul><ul><li>How students are selected for the MCI program </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cover Letter, Resume, Phone Interview </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits for students involved in MCI program </li></ul>
  6. 6. Theory <ul><li>What is Theory? </li></ul><ul><li>It is a way of organizing thoughts to be true about college students into a framework, which can serve as a platform to start from when working with students. </li></ul><ul><li>Meant to inform and guide </li></ul><ul><li>Typically researched based. Tries to explain why something happens a certain way. </li></ul><ul><li>Takes something complex and simplifies it, so that it is manageable </li></ul><ul><li>Theory is fluid as the world we live in and people constantly change </li></ul>
  7. 7. Student Development Theory <ul><li>Useful theories for student retention and development: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schlossberg: Transition Theory (1981) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schlossberg: Mattering vs Marginality (1989) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Astin: Involvement theory (1984) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sanford: Challenge and Support (1966) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evans, N.J., Forney, D. S., & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student Development in college: Theory, research, and practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Transition Theory <ul><li>Nancy Schlossberg’s Transition Theory (1981)- </li></ul><ul><li>A transition is defined as any event, or non-event, that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions, and roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Three sets of variables: individual’s perception of the transition; characteristics of the pre and post transition environments; and individual characteristics (personality). </li></ul><ul><li>Each of these variables could be considered assets, liabilities, or a mix of the two, or neutral in regard to influence on the ability to cope. The impact of such stress is dependent on the ratio of the individual’s assets to liabilities at the time </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Factors that influence a person’s ability to handle the transition: </li></ul><ul><li>Situation: trigger, timing, control, duration, other stress, etc </li></ul><ul><li>Self: personal characteristics, psychological resources, stage of life, health, values, outlook on life </li></ul><ul><li>Support: intimate relationships, family units, networks of friends, communities </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies : coping modes- information seeking, direct action, and inhibition of action </li></ul><ul><li>Manage the change from the transition by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding new roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create purpose/plans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-esteem, values clarification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support networks </li></ul></ul>Transition Theory
  10. 10. Mattering vs. Marginality <ul><li>Schlossberg’s Mattering vs. Marginality, (1989) </li></ul><ul><li>Mattering —belief that we are connected and important to others, this belief motivates action. </li></ul><ul><li>Marginality —change in role or experiences; Sense of not fitting in, uncertain about what new role entails. </li></ul><ul><li>Student success linked to mattering ; mattering precedes involvement (Astin). </li></ul>
  11. 11. Involvement Theory Astin (1984) Involvement theory - Involvement is the amount of physical and psychological energy that the student devotes to an academic experience. Involvement refers to behavior. What they do versus what they think or feel. Involvement is in both time and seriousness/attention given to it. The more a student puts into an activity the more they will get out of it.
  12. 12. Challenge and Support <ul><li>Sanford’s Challenge and Support Theory, (1966) </li></ul><ul><li>A student’s success is dependent largely on the degree of challenge and support that exists in the student’s university environment whereby too much challenge is overwhelming and too little challenge is debilitating. </li></ul><ul><li>If a student is not challenged, the student may retreat readiness of being challenged. </li></ul><ul><li>Students strive to restore equilibrium. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Limitations of Theory <ul><li>Looking at theory as possibly fact puts students in a “small box” not recognizing their lived experiences and grouping all students in that particular category together as one, ignoring uniqueness and deeper insights. </li></ul><ul><li>Theory builds upon theory which typically derives from traditional development and psychological theories which were typically based on a limited sample of students and this ignores the growing diversity: color, religion, ethnicity, etc. of students on today’s college campuses. </li></ul><ul><li>Linear stage model includes perceived judgments based on place and status position within a theory. More recent theories are emerging as more cyclical non-linear. Better representing the fluid complex and dynamic nature of development. May occupy multiple stages or up and down one day from the next. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Student Perspective: Rocio Garcia <ul><li>How I learned of the MCI program </li></ul><ul><li>Interview; training </li></ul><ul><li>Transition to College </li></ul><ul><li>CAMP </li></ul><ul><li>Programs: Day of the Dead, Dancing, Quinceaneras, Cinco de Mayo, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>How it impacted me </li></ul><ul><li>MCI Mentor </li></ul>
  15. 15. Cultivating Student Leaders <ul><li>What MCI’s are doing now? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6 out of 8 in leadership positions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RAs, Student Involvement, Latino Community Outreach Program, MCI Mentor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current MCI’s already “planting seeds” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>for future leadership positions </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Questions?

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