Carbon Calculators

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Carbon Calculators

  1. 1. Carbon Calculators Group 2
  2. 2. The Calculators We Chose  Environmental Protection Agency  Berkeley CoolClimate  Nature Conservancy These calculators seemed to be the most in- depth and represented different types of organizations (a government agency, university, and an environmental organization)
  3. 3. Differences in Criteria  The Berkeley CoolClimate calculator seems to give us the largest carbon footprint.  Motivations: expand knowledge and awareness of sources of carbon emissions  Target population: Academics, intellectuals, persons seeking to gain further information about the environmental problem
  4. 4. Differences in Criteria  The E.P.A., surprisingly, seemed to give us the smallest footprint of all the calculators.  Motivations: government institution, neutrality, mobilize others to support the E.P.A., provide simple/easy/cheap ways to reduce their carbon footprint  Target Population: persons/businesses seriously seeking to gain real information about their carbon footprint and practical ways on how to lower it.
  5. 5. Differences in Criteria  The Nature Conservancy was the most user- friendly out of all of the calculators.  Motivations: increase awareness of the environmental problem among people who have not necessarily been exposed to such information, easy-to-use, self-promotion  Target Population: everyday people, people relatively new to the environmental movement, younger people
  6. 6. Criteria Commonalities  All of the calculators took into consideration:  The state/region you lived  Car mileage / # of miles driven  People in household
  7. 7. Trade-offs  Some calculators show the impact of changes when the user modifies behavior, which allow people to alter their behavior based on the results.  Some calculators generalize for ease of use, but sacrifice specificity and accuracy, for example, the Nature Conservancy.
  8. 8. Conclusions  Designers need to keep in mind that there are lots of calculators already out there; need to consider your specific audience and their needs  Can’t design one ‘perfect’/stable calculator  Making it clear how many variables are present in these calculations would be helpful  None of the calculators said how accurate they were; implied high accuracy even if it was impossible based on given data  Stable Technology? Based on trade-off options and different criteria, no

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