Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
The guilty couch potatoLeonard Reinecke, U. Mainz; Tilo Hartmann & Allison Eden, VU University AmsterdamMedia and well-bei...
Participants 471 respondents who had1. worked and2. played video games (n = 262)or watched TV (n = 209) the day before R...
Results: Two-Group Path ModelTV (n = 209)Ego-DepletionProcrastinationGuiltRecoveryExperienceEnjoymentVitality.20.56-.22-.1...
The results demonstrate a paradoxical situation: Ego-depleted individuals have high need for recovery Are less able to b...
Many thanks for your attention!Leonard ReineckeJohannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, GermanyTilo Hartmann & Allison Eden...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Guilty Couch Potato: The role of negative emotions in recovery through media use

1,164 views

Published on

Individuals with depleted self-control may be particularly prone to engage in negative
appraisals of media use. These appraisals may lessen the potentially restorative effects of media. Results from an online survey support this relationship, suggesting that “guilty couch potatoes” are least likely to experience restorative benefits of entertaining media use

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Guilty Couch Potato: The role of negative emotions in recovery through media use

  1. 1. The guilty couch potatoLeonard Reinecke, U. Mainz; Tilo Hartmann & Allison Eden, VU University AmsterdamMedia and well-being: A mixed relationship Positive Stress recovery (Reinecke, 2009a, 2009b, Reinecke, Klatt, & Kramer, 2011) Satisfaction of intrinsic needs (Tamborini et al., 2010, 2011; Reinecke et al. 2012) Negative General TV use on happiness (Robinson & Martin, 2008) Relaxing during use, not after (Kubey &Csikszentmihalyi, 1990) Goal conflict• The volitional state of media user may affect the appraisal of media use• In ego-depleted individuals, feelings of guilt regarding media use may reduce therecovery effect of entertaining media• Media use interpreted as procrastination (Kubey &Csikszentmihalyi, 1990)• Feeling guilty for using media to recover• Less likely to benefit from positive factors of media use
  2. 2. Participants 471 respondents who had1. worked and2. played video games (n = 262)or watched TV (n = 209) the day before Recruited at a German video games website, two universities in Germany and oneuniversity in Switzerland 61.8 percent male, Mage= 25.1 yearsMeasures Ego depletion scale (Ciarocco, Twenge, Muraven, & Tice, 2007; α = .941) Procrastination (Tuckman, 1991; α = .910) Guilt (Marschall, Saftner & Tangney, 1994; α = .927) Recovery (Sonnentag & Fritz, 2007; α = .818) Vitality (ADACL, Thayer, 1989, α = .912) Enjoyment (2 items, α = .893)The guilty couch potatoLeonard Reinecke, U. Mainz, Tilo Hartmann & Allison Eden, VU University Amsterdam
  3. 3. Results: Two-Group Path ModelTV (n = 209)Ego-DepletionProcrastinationGuiltRecoveryExperienceEnjoymentVitality.20.56-.22-.19.36.13.25Ego-DepletionProcrastinationGuiltRecoveryExperienceEnjoymentVitality.26.58-.21-.11 (ns).29.15.15Video Games (n = 262)χ²(14) = 28.95, p < .05; CMIN/df = 2.07, CFI = .965, RMSEA = .048, SRMR = .053
  4. 4. The results demonstrate a paradoxical situation: Ego-depleted individuals have high need for recovery Are less able to benefit from entertaining media to provide that recovery Due to negative appraisal of their own behaviorLimitations: Sample structure Retrospective responses Cross-sectional dataCurrent studies: Ego depletion and the selection of emotionally and cognitively challenging media Long term self-regulation and media selection in new environments Media use and well-being: An experience sampling methodThe guilty couch potatoLeonard Reinecke, U. Mainz, Tilo Hartmann & Allison Eden, VU University Amsterdam
  5. 5. Many thanks for your attention!Leonard ReineckeJohannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, GermanyTilo Hartmann & Allison EdenVU University AmsterdamContact: a.l.eden@vu.nl

×