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Nominative Case <ul><li>Nominative case is used for the subject of the sentence and for the predicate nouns. </li></ul>
Cases <ul><li>Russian has a lot of cases: 6 </li></ul>
Cases <ul><li>Those cases are called:
Nominative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Prepositional
Instrumental </li></ul>
But...what's a case?!
Definition of grammatical case <ul><li>Case: Inflectional category, basically of nouns, which typically marks their role i...
My source:
But what does that mean?! <ul><li>Well, for Russian that means the endings of nouns can change depending on their relation...
Nominative Case <ul><li>Nominative is the case you find in the dictionary. It's the default case. Don't change anything if...
Nominative Case <ul><li>You use the nominative for two types of nouns: the subject of the sentence and the predicate. </li...
Ivan the Terrible murders.
Ivan the Terrible murders. <ul>“Ivan the Terrible” is the subject of the sentence, because he's the one doing the murderin...
Ivan the Terrible is a murderer.
Ivan the Terrible is a murderer. <ul>“Murderer” is the predicate. </ul>
But...what's a predicate?!
Definition of predicate <ul><li>Predicate: A part of a clause or sentence traditionally seen as representing what is said ...
My source:
Ivan the Terrible is a murderer. <ul>So “murderer” is the predicate, because  <li>it's said of the subject. </li></ul>
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Nominative

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What cases are and what they do.

What the nominative case is and when we use it.

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Nominative

  1. 1. Nominative Case <ul><li>Nominative case is used for the subject of the sentence and for the predicate nouns. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Cases <ul><li>Russian has a lot of cases: 6 </li></ul>
  3. 3. Cases <ul><li>Those cases are called:
  4. 4. Nominative
  5. 5. Accusative
  6. 6. Genitive
  7. 7. Dative
  8. 8. Prepositional
  9. 9. Instrumental </li></ul>
  10. 10. But...what's a case?!
  11. 11. Definition of grammatical case <ul><li>Case: Inflectional category, basically of nouns, which typically marks their role in relation to other parts of the sentence. </li></ul>
  12. 12. My source:
  13. 13. But what does that mean?! <ul><li>Well, for Russian that means the endings of nouns can change depending on their relationship to the rest of the sentence. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Nominative Case <ul><li>Nominative is the case you find in the dictionary. It's the default case. Don't change anything if the word is in the nominative case. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Nominative Case <ul><li>You use the nominative for two types of nouns: the subject of the sentence and the predicate. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Ivan the Terrible murders.
  17. 17. Ivan the Terrible murders. <ul>“Ivan the Terrible” is the subject of the sentence, because he's the one doing the murdering. </ul>
  18. 18. Ivan the Terrible is a murderer.
  19. 19. Ivan the Terrible is a murderer. <ul>“Murderer” is the predicate. </ul>
  20. 20. But...what's a predicate?!
  21. 21. Definition of predicate <ul><li>Predicate: A part of a clause or sentence traditionally seen as representing what is said of, or predicated of, the subject. </li></ul>
  22. 22. My source:
  23. 23. Ivan the Terrible is a murderer. <ul>So “murderer” is the predicate, because <li>it's said of the subject. </li></ul>
  24. 24. So in Russian...
  25. 25. Ив а н Гр о зный уб ий ца...
  26. 26. Ив а н Гр о зный уб ий ца... <ul><li>Where “Иван Грозный” is in the nominative, because it's the subject of the sentence...
  27. 27. ...and “убийца” is in the nominative too, because it's the predicate. </li></ul>
  28. 28. But let's try a simpler sentence...
  29. 29. Ш у рик и Л и да студ е нты.
  30. 30. Ш у рик и Л и да студ е нты. <ul><li>Where “Шурик и Лида” (Shurik and Lida) are in the nominative, because they are the subject of the sentence...
  31. 31. ...and “студенты” is in the nominative too, because it's said of Shurik and Lida, and “students” is therefore the predicate. </li></ul>

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