Screencasting Handout

1,236 views

Published on

A handout prepared for the class "Screencasting: Creating Online Tutorials" sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Chapter Medical Library Association, October 18, 2009

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,236
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Screencasting Handout

  1. 1. Screencasting: Creating Online Tutorials<br />Alison Aldrich, Technology Outreach Coordinator, NN/LM PNR<br />19050138430Students will…<br />- Understand what screencasting is and what it requires- Learn to employ useful instructional design techniques<br />- Identify the instructional needs best addressed using screencasts- Practice the steps required to create effective screencasts<br />For a Just in Time screencast, you need:<br />A computer with optional microphone and webcam<br />Free or inexpensive screencast software<br />A plan for sharing your screencast via a webpage, email or social media<br />For a high quality, Made to Last screencast, you should have:<br />Input from your intended audience<br />Learning objectives<br />A storyboard and script<br />A computer with optional microphone and webcam<br />Software with appropriate video editing capabilities<br />Plans for promoting and evaluating your screencast<br />About one hour of staff time per minute of video<br />Instructional Design Concepts<br />The ADDIE method1: A way to track and manage instruction projects.<br />Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation<br />19050112395<br /> Bloom’s Taxonomy2: A means of developing measurable learning outcomes.<br />Image by dkutopatwa on flickr, Creative Commons license. http://bit.ly/271ktl<br />Information Literacy Standards such as those from ACRL3 suggest specific performance indicators and desired outcomes. <br />Kirpatrick’s Four Levels of Evaluation4:<br />Reaction – Do they like it?<br />Learning – Did they gain knowledge?<br />Behavior – Did that knowledge impact behavior?<br />Results – What is the big picture?<br />Contact Alison:Phone: 206-221-3489aldrich3@uw.edu<br />see Software Comparison Chart<br />Good microphone options:<br />Plantronics headset, $25Sennheiser PC 156 headset, $60<br /> Blue Snowball, $81<br />Fill in the blanks:<br />What makes a good screencast?What makes a not-so-good screencast?<br />Works Cited<br />1 Harriman, G. (2004). Instructional design: ADDIE. Accessed 10/16/09 from http://www.grayharriman.com/ADDIE.htm<br />2 Anderson, LW. and Krathwohl, D,R., et al (Eds.) (2001) A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of <br />Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.<br />3 American Library Association (2006). Information literacy competency standards for higher education." Accessed <br />10/16/09 fromhttp://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm<br />4 Kirkpatrick, D.L. (1994). Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler.<br />Additional Resources<br />Blummer, B.A and Kritskaya, O. (2009). Best practices for creating an online tutorial: a literature review. Journal of Web <br />Librarianship 3: 199-216.<br />Software reviews by Melissa Rethlefsen for Library Journal:<br />Free screencating tools (1/15/09) - http://bit.ly/4hnhrO<br />Screencast like a pro (4/15/09) - http://bit.ly/IZzIl<br />Moodle page for this course (Log in as guest):<br />http://nnlm.gov/moodle/course/view.php?id=53<br />

×