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HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                                                                      ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionINTRODUCTIONWhat is the Hispanic...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 Edition2011: WHERE THE DOLLARS WENTOne...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                        2012 EditionThe improvement in Hispanic advert...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 EditionBIG INVESTMENTS FROM CORE ADVER...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 EditionGeneral Mills and Toyota Motor ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                            2012 EditionRADIO: DOLLARS FUELED BY EMERG...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete   2012 Edition9|Page
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                              2012 EditionWith national dollars down a...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                        2012 EditionAlready, “radio” is a term that sh...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                            2012 EditionTHE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: POPU...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionIn 2000 Latinos surpassed Blacks...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                                2012 Edition                         M...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 Edition               HISPANIC POPULATI...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                         2012 Edition             HISPANIC POPULATION ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                        2012 Edition       HISPANIC VS. NON-HISPANIC W...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                            2012 EditionRecent immigrants have increas...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                      2012 Edition                                    ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 Edition2011: EARNINGS AND EXPENDITURES ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                     2012 Edition                                     ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete   2012 Edition22 | P a g e
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionTHE OPPORTUNITYDespite the size ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                                                                      ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 EditionAGENCYHISPANIC VS. ‘SPANISH’: T...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                                  2012 Editionthe pack in terms of sal...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionIM: With 18 years of client-side...
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HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                               2012 EditionAGENCYTHE HISPANIC CONSUMER...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                         2012 EditionIn fact, buying certain English-l...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 EditionAGENCY/ONLINE/PRSOCIAL MEDIA: T...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                        2012 EditionRepública’s Jorge Plasencia, in an...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionAGENCY/ONLINE/PRBRAND LEADERSHIP...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 Edition(espanol.sonicdrivein.com), and ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                              2012 EditionONLINETHE PORTAL: ADAPTING F...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete   2012 Edition36 | P a g e
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                              2012 EditionDigital platforms also prese...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 EditionMEDIACULTURAL FLUENCY: WHAT MAT...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionThe fact remains that our conten...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 Editioncontent for Hispanic America. Ou...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                           2012 EditionMEDIACROSS-PLATFORM VALUESSpani...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionStill, Telemundo is taking a cau...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                            2012 Editionmore Spanish-dominant at home ...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete   2012 Edition44 | P a g e
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                            2012 EditionSPORTSA KEY CONNECTOR TO LATIN...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                          2012 EditionHMO: How is ESPN Deportes accomp...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                              2012 Editionreally try to say to the adv...
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete   2012 Edition48 | P a g e
HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete                            2012 EditionSYNDICATED RADIO PROGRAMMINGMU...
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
Hispanic Market Overview 2012
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Hispanic Market Overview 2012

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Hispanic Market Overview 2012

  1. 1. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition TABLE OF CONTENTSINTRODUCTION 32011: WHERE THE DOLLARS WENTBIG INVESTMENTS FROM CORE ADVERTISERS 6RADIO: DOLLARS FUELED BY EMERGING MARKET GROWTH 8THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: POPULATION SNAPSHOT 12MULTICULTURAL AMERICA, BY COUNTY—2016 14HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH —1980 15HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH — 2016 16HISPANIC VS. NON-HISPANIC WHITE POPULATION GROWTH – 1990-2016 17   *  U.S.  Hispanic  population  vs.  Total  population  –  Top  50  markets  –  2011     24  THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: AGENCYHISPANIC VS. ‘SPANISH’: THE BATTLE EVOLVES 25THE HISPANIC CONSUMER: CONSTANTLY CROSSING CULTURES 29THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: AGENCY/ONLINE/PRSOCIAL MEDIA: THE HISPANIC HOT SPOT 31BRAND LEADERSHIP, ACROSS ALL PLATFORMS 33THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: ONLINETHE PORTAL: ADAPTING FOR ITS AUDIENCE 35THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: MEDIACULTURAL FLUENCY: WHAT MATTERS MOST 38CROSS-PLATFORM VALUES 41TR3S: ‘A BRIDGE BETWEEN TWO WORLDS’ 42THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: SPORTSA KEY CONNECTOR TO LATINO CONSUMERS 45THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: SYNDICATED RADIO PROGRAMMINGMUSIC, TALK, AND LOTS OF GOALS 49THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: TECHNOLOGYCONTEXTUAL POWER 52HMO MARKET PROFILE: CHICAGO 54THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: NEWSPAPERSDIGITAL DIVERSIFICATION 57THE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: MAGAZINESHISPANIC GLOSSY OVERVIEW: WHO’S SPENDING WHERE 59ABOUT THE AUTHOR 61ADVERTISER INDEX 622|Page
  2. 2. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionINTRODUCTIONWhat is the Hispanic market all about?According to Tony Ruiz at The Vidal Partnership, that is one of the most-feared questionsfrom creatives. In a conversation at his New York office in late November 2011, Ruiz andI spoke about how to shape the 2012 edition of Hispanic Market Overview. Ruiz and Ihad previously exchanged some thoughts about how “disgusting” the level ofadvertising dollars allocated to Spanish-language media was. I challenged his remark,pointing to the rise in English-preferred Hispanics and bilinguals and, as a result, loweruse of Spanish-language media.Through interviews conducted over the first quarter of 2012 and through researchstudies examined over late nights shared with Chinese food and Magic Hat beer, itbecame clear that Ruiz had a very valid point. Indeed, the share of advertising dollarsgoing to Spanish-language media is below where it should be. But it is the share ofdollars to “Hispanic media” that needs to increase.“Hispanic media” is comprised of not only Spanish-language media but also English-language media featuring culturally relevant content for the bilingual, bicultural Latino– the largest growth segment of the U.S. Hispanic market. There is also “Spanglish”media, with a mix of English and Spanish targeting a young, hip and influentialaudience. Interestingly, that’s nothing new – WQBA-FM “Super Q” did that in Miaminearly 30 years ago, and the WPBT-Channel 2 sitcom “Qué Pasa, U.S.A.” continues tolive on in reruns nearly 40 years after its ground-breaking debut. Today, “Qué Pasa,U.S.A.” is still ahead of its time. That’s pathetic.Multicultural America is rapidly becoming Mainstream U.S.A. That’s why this reportdelves deep into the key issues facing marketers, agencies, media buyers and mediaplanners already familiar with the players. New to Hispanic marketing and seek thebasics, or a “Hispanic 101?” We invite you to download the 2010 and 2011 editions ofHispanic Market Overview by visiting AdamRJacobson.com.According to the Selig Center for Economic Growth 2010 report “The MulticulturalEconomy,” Hispanic buying power is expected to grow by 50% between 2010 and 2015,to $1.5 trillion. A Nielsen study of U.S. population by ancestry found that Mexicansaccount for 33 million Americans, second only to Germans and ahead of the Irish, theEnglish and Italians.If you’re not marketing to Hispanics, why bother selling your product, good or service?Adam R Jacobson3|Page
  3. 3. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition2011: WHERE THE DOLLARS WENTOne year ago, uncertainty about when advertising activity would get its Census 2010-fueled jump start was still a topic of discussion among many Hispanic marketing andadvertising professionals. By September, optimism rose. As 2011 came to a close, arobust fourth-quarter gave Hispanic media the adrenaline boost it had craved formonths: Hispanic media is not only healthy, but it far outperformed the total market in2011.According to Kantar Media, Spanish-language television enjoyed an 8.3% jump inmeasured ad spending between 2010 and 2011. This statistic includes the fourbroadcast networks rated by Nielsen – Univision, Telemundo, TeleFutura and AztecaAmérica – in addition to four undisclosed Spanish-language cable television networksand 71 local Spanish-language television stations. Higher sell-out levels at over-the-airnetworks served as the chief catalyst for the growth. With the anticipated Q3 launch ofMundoFox in 20 Designated Market Areas (DMAs), along with the addition of newUnivision cable networks, ad spending for Spanish-language television is set to see itsbiggest surge in years.With Hispanic TV on fire, marketers and advertisers should also set their sights on Spanish-language magazines. Kantar Media, which uses data from the Publishers InformationBureau, measured nearly 25% year-over-year increases in measured ad spending forHispanic glossies between 2010 and 2011. Spanish-language newspapers also sawgrowth – bucking the trend of total-market dailies and weeklies, which continue to seereader and advertiser erosion. Kantar Media data show Hispanic newspapers enjoyinga nearly 2% improvement in measured ad spending from 2010 to 2011. By comparison,total market newspapers were off 3.7%, year to year.The spectacular performance of Hispanic media in 2011 was fueled in large part bysteep rises fourth quarter activity, compared to 2010. Spanish-language TV was up19.1% in Q4 ’11, compared to the same period a year earlier. Spanish-languagemagazines grew 25.1% from Q4 ’10 to Q4 ’11, while Spanish-language newspapersenjoyed a stunning 10.4% rise in Q4 ’11.With a flurry of activity highlighted by the launch of a new Spanish-language broadcasttelevision network, in addition to new cable television networks from the No. 1 Hispanicentertainment company, increased attention to the Latino media consumer willheighten awareness and provide greater opportunities to capture more ad dollarswhile welcoming the advertiser that has remained reluctant to engage with consumerswho enjoy Spanish-language content -- no matter their preferred language.4|Page
  4. 4. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionThe improvement in Hispanic advertising dollars came as overall ad spending during Q4slipped by 1%, compared to the same period in 2010. This marks the first quarterlydecline since the end of 2009 and points to a slowdown in advertising growth ratesseen in every quarter since Q3 2010.Why? Digital and mobile budget shifts could be the culprit. In prepared comments,Kantar Media Intelligence North America SVP/Research Jon Swallen said, “Whether thisis an isolated occurrence or an early sign of digital dollars moving more quickly towardemerging and unmeasured digital platforms bears watching as 2012 unfolds.”5|Page
  5. 5. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionBIG INVESTMENTS FROM CORE ADVERTISERSKantar Media data show the top 10 advertisers in Hispanic media investing $1.4 billionduring 2011 – a jump of 29.2%. Yet this group accounts for 24.7% of all Hispanic mediaexpenditures, the largest Top 10 share concentration of any medium.Indeed, the Top 10 players are largely familiar to Hispanic market observers. Discounting“Broadcasting Media Partners,” a pseudonym for activity across Univision’s multimediaproperties, the top advertiser in Hispanic media during 2011 was Procter & Gamble, with$209.6 million invested.P&G increased its Hispanic marketing budget by 9.6% from 2010 – despite an overall dipin its advertising dollars, year-to-year. According to Kantar Media, P&G remained theNo. 1 overall advertiser by a large margin, with $2.95 billion invested in all U.S. media in2011. That actually reflects a 5.4% drop in ad dollars from 2010 for the consumerpackaged goods (CPG) giant. P&G’s activity in 2012 is set to reach new heights, thanksto the recent appointment of Ernesto Adduci as Vice President/Account Director forLápiz, leading the agency’s efforts with such brands as Gain, Bounty, Charmin, Always,Dawn, Prilosec OTC, Herbal Essences, Puffs and Clear Blue.Meanwhile, Hispanic media can brag about a whopping 131% year-over-yearinvestment increase for Kraft Foods seen in 2011. The jump came as the company inMarch 2011 selected Houston-based López Negrete Communications to handle brandleadership, strategic planning, business analytics and creative development for itsMaxwell House coffee brand in the U.S. Hispanic market.Agency CEO Alex López Negrete cited his firm’s experience with CPG companies insuccessfully building Hispanic consumer activity in nabbing the account. MaxwellHouse joins Kraft mayonnaise, Kraft Singles cheese, and Ritz crackers on the LNC roster.,6|Page
  6. 6. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionGeneral Mills and Toyota Motor Corp. also played their part in making 2011 a strongyear for Hispanic media. Neither brand made the overall top 10, according to KantarMedia.The same can be said for Dish Network, which grew its Hispanic advertising budgetby71.2% from 2010 to 2011 and is now the No. 2 advertiser, ahead of McDonald’s. Thequick service restaurant (QSR) chain slimmed its overall Hispanic marketing dollars by2.6%, to $114.4 million, but remains an integral and vibrant player. Digital, mobile,experiential and “grass roots” marketing dollars should also be considered when lookingat the golden arches.Wireless services companies tempered their overall Hispanic market ad expenditures,with Verizon and AT&T scaling back their overall dollars to Spanish-language media.General Motors is now No. 10 among U.S. Hispanic market advertisers.Companies in the overall top 10 that are absent from the Hispanic top 10 include Pfizer,which invested more than $1.2 billion in total market media in both 2010 and 2011.L’Oreal SA grew its overall budget by 18.1% in 2011, to $1.34 billion, and ranks sixth; thecompany is highly active in the U.S. Hispanic market, in particular with print and onlinevehicles targeting Latinas.7|Page
  7. 7. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionRADIO: DOLLARS FUELED BY EMERGING MARKET GROWTHIt is well established that the bulk of the U.S. Hispanic market’s advertising dollars areconcentrated in Spanish-language television – the mass media that assumingly deliversthe most eyeballs for the buck.Yet the radio industry has traditionally done the best job of tracking advertising dollarsand reporting on annual results. BIA/Kelsey in April 2012 released its top-line total radiorevenue data for 2011, and an interesting dichotomy has developed. As reported byRadio-Info.com columnist Tom Taylor, Portland, Maine enjoyed 22.8% revenue growthbetween 2010 and 2011, finishing out the year with $25.4 million in total radio revenue.In Worcester, Mass., just to the west of Boston, total radio revenue increased 15.8%, to$12.9 million, from 2010 to 2011. Mid-size markets also enjoyed healthy albeit moreconservative growth – Providence, RI, home to sizable Portuguese and Latinocommunities, saw total radio revenue improve 9.9%, to $45.3 million. According toBIA/Kelsey, these increases are endemic in times when national advertising dollarsshrink. That’s exactly what happened in the last few months of 2011, when the nation’stop markets saw national activity slide.Overall over-the-air revenues were statistically flat in 2011, inching ahead 0.9% from2010 to finish at $14.1 billion, BIA/Kelsey reports. Online and digital revenue brings anadditional $439 million to the total, with strong growth ahead. BIA/Kelsey predictsradio’s online revenues to easily surpass $500 million in 2012 and surge to $767 million by2016.8|Page
  8. 8. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition9|Page
  9. 9. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionWith national dollars down and local activity up for all radio stations, where does thatleave Hispanic radio? The forecast is cloudy, with occasional bursts of sunshine.Emerging markets represent the strongest growth for Hispanic radio broadcasters, withcompanies such as Adelante Media Group, Entravision, Curtis Media Group, DavidsonMedia Group, Connoisseur Media and even the largest operator in the U.S., ClearChannel, active in some of the most lucrative markets, long term.Are client-side marketers, advertisers and media buyers interested? In an October 2012visit to a large media buying and planning agency by The Adam R Jacobson EditorialServices and Research Consultancy, discussion about the Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto DMA was tempered by questions about the Los Angeles market. Are marketssuch as Milwaukee and Philadelphia ignored because they are so close to mega-sizedmarkets such as Chicago and New York, respectively? Are budgets so tight among marketers that investing in Hispanic media in a sub-Top 15 Hispanic DMA simply costs too much? “We need to unite, as an industry, and go According to top Hispanic radio broadcasting after Corporate America. We can worry about executives, the troubles Spanish-language and competition later, but we need to hit Hispanic-themed audio content companies face Corporate America over the head … I’m are perhaps more fundamental. Speaking at the going to do it whether I am joined or not.” Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference, held in — Jeffrey Liberman, Entravision Radio March 2012 in San Diego, Adelante Media Group CEO Jay Meyers – a veteran of total-market radio– said he is not one to go into an agency to talk about getting Hispanic advertisingdollars. “I’m here to talk about how 100 percent of the dollars are going to reach 87percent of the market … and that’s stupid! If we got 33 cents on the dollar for thepercentage of the audience that is Hispanic, we wouldn’t be here [in San Diego]today. We’d be in Maui, paying our own way.”Entravision Radio Division President Jeffrey Liberman declared that it is tougher todayfor Hispanic radio sales executives than it was in 1992 to lure advertisers. Therefore, hecalled on Hispanic radio to step up in unison and start fighting for its rightful share of thead dollars. “We have to do a better job in sales and provide our advertisers reasons tobuy us. Today, we have a more competitive marketplace. Research has gotten better.We need to unite, as an industry, and go after Corporate America. We can worryabout competition later, but we need to hit Corporate America over the head … I’mgoing to do it whether I am joined or not.”In 2007 total radio revenues came in at $17.9 billion. Even with digital and online growth,is an $18 billion target a dream of yesteryear? As the U.S. economy starts to recoverfrom its worst economic malaise since the 1930s, the App may be the best thing thatcould have ever happened to the radio industry.10 | P a g e
  10. 10. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionAlready, “radio” is a term that should be replaced by “audio content,” given theproliferation of Smartphone-friendly Apps including Clear Channel’s iHeartRadio, CBSRadio’s Radio.com and TuneIn, which allows users to stream thousands of AM and FMstations from around the world within seconds of conducting a search by song title, aparticular recording artist, or the radio station’s name.According to the 2012 edition of The Infinite Dial,produced in partnership by radio industry ratingsfirm Arbitron and Edison Research, the average ¡QUE BUENA DINERO!daily time Americans spend with AM and/or FM Univision’s regionalradio is 2 hours, 7 minutes. For heavy Internet users, Mexican WOJO-FM wasit is 2 hours, 14 minutes. Chicago’s sixth-biggestYet for all of the worry about rapidly changing station in terms of adconsumption habits of AM and FM broadcasts, revenue in 2011, billingHispanic broadcast companies and their $21.3 million, accordingadvertisers should be pleased with the current to Miller Kaplan Arase &portrait of how people tune in: Radio and Co. data reported byonline/digital activities complement each other, TimeOut Chicago radiowith 87% of weekly online radio listeners columnist Robert Feder.consuming AM and/or FM radio in the last seven CBS Radio’s WBBM-FMdays. Additionally, as reported by Radio-Info.com’s (B96), a Top 40 stationTom Taylor, 68% of individuals who listen to AM with a significantand/or FM broadcasts while at-work do so with “a Hispanic audience, billedregular radio” – and not via streamed audio. $23.5 million and ranks fourth.Even so, Arbitron/Edison found 18% of respondentslistening to AM and FM radio on a computer, and13% listening to the radio on a mobile device –numbers that will most certainly increase over time.As Hispanics largely overindex on smartphone use, with Mintel noting in a 2011 reportthat 1 in 5 Latinos use such devices as their primary internet gateway, Hispanicbroadcasters may wish to further embrace the App to grow its listener base whileconcurrently luring new media dollars.11 | P a g e
  11. 11. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionTHE U.S. HISPANIC MARKET: POPULATION SNAPSHOTMuch has been said and blogged about the “New American Mainstream,” a termcoined by Miami-based multicultural market intelligence firm Geoscape. Indeed, the“total market” in the U.S. is more inclusive of multicultural groups than ever before andcan no longer be considered a “minority.”According to Geoscape, the non-Hispanic White population will be roughly equal insize to the combined total population of Hispanics, Blacks and Asians in 38 years. In justfour years – in 2016 -- Hispanics will comprise 58.4 million of the 326.1 million people whoreside in the U.S. This compares with 40 million Blacks (inclusive of African-American,Caribbean and African peoples) and 16.5 Asians (inclusive of Pacific Islanders); 212.3million Americans will fall into the “other” category, suggesting that a surge in mixed-race populaces is continuing at rapid-fire pace.Source: Geoscape, American MarketScape Datastream, 2011 series12 | P a g e
  12. 12. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionIn 2000 Latinos surpassed Blacks as the largest multicultural group. The Hispanicpopulation continues to surge – thanks mainly to births, rather than immigration. In 2011Hispanics comprised 16.4% of the total U.S. population. In less than four years, nearly18% of the population will be Hispanic – accounting for 58.4 million.In the last 10 years alone, the U.S. has seen the following changes: • Nearly 16 million Hispanics have been added to the population • 45% growth in the Hispanic population was seen between 2001-2011 • Hispanic population growth from 2001 to 2011 accounted for 52% of total U.S. population growth13 | P a g e
  13. 13. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition Multicultural America, By County - 2016  Non-Hispanic Whites are the minority in an increasing number of counties – 326 in 2011, according to Geoscape.The top 15 counties in the U.S., by multicultural population, as of 2011 are as follows: • Los Angeles, CA • Cook, IL • Harris, TX • Orange, CA • Kings, NY • Miami-Dade, FL • Dallas, TX • Queens, NY • Riverside, CA • San Bernardino, CA • Clark, NV • Santa Clara, CA • Broward, FL • Bexar, TX • Philadelphia, PA14 | P a g e
  14. 14. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH – 1980In1980, gateway states bordering Mexico experienced the most population growth.Additionally, Miami-Dade County was transformed by a wave of Cuban immigrationresulting from the Mariel boatlift -- a mass emigration of Cubans who arrived in Floridabetween April 15 and October 31, 1980.Courtesy of Geoscape15 | P a g e
  15. 15. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH – 2016Today, gateway cities for Latinos are no longer along the Mexican border or within 120nautical miles of Cuba. Atlanta and metropolitan Chicago are important entry pointsfor Hispanic immigrants, as are agricultural areas in eastern North Carolina, westernIowa and across Nebraska and Kansas. Western Arkansas is now an important Latinocenter, while metropolitan Washington, DC has experienced sizable growth from notonly Mexican immigration but also Caribbean Hispanics of Cuban, Puerto Rican andDominican heritage.Courtesy of GeoscapeThis differs dramatically from African-American growth trends, as the vast majority ofBlacks reside in the South. The highest percentage of Asians reside in California, withother significant pockets in greater Seattle, Chicago, New York, Boston, Dallas, Houston(accounting for Hmong), and Washington, DC.16 | P a g e
  16. 16. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition HISPANIC VS. NON-HISPANIC WHITE POPULATION GROWTH – 1990-2016According to Geoscape, Charlotte is the leader in percentage gain for Hispanicpopulation growth between 1990 and 2016. Atlanta and Raleigh are second and third,respectively, followed by the Orlando-Daytona Beach-Melbourne and Minneapolis-St.Paul DMAs. Central Florida has seen rapid growth in Puerto Rican and Mexicanemigration, while the Twin Cities has seen the arrival of Mexicans and Central Americans. Marketers should strongly consider investing in Hispanic media in the emerging markets shown above to maximize their opportunities for Latino consumer growth. Acculturation is the process whereby immigrants acquire a new culture through language, customs, lifestyle, media usage and other practices while retaining elements of their home culture as well. For Hispanics, Geoscape® calls this characteristic Hispanicity™. At left are the CultureCodes as determined by Geoscape.17 | P a g e
  17. 17. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionRecent immigrants have increased the proportion of non-acculturatedLatinoamericanas, while second and third-generation Hispanics have increasedthe proportion of Americanizados and Nueva Latinas. Nevertheless, the Hispanicpopulation will increase in all segments.Source: Geoscape, American MarketScape DataStream, 2011 series.The Miami-Fort Lauderdale DMA is perhaps the only large metropolitan area in whichnearly half of the population (48%) is either Spanish-preferred or Spanish-dominant. InHouston and Los Angeles, biculturals and those who prefer to use English more thanSpanish – or exclusively – are the majority of the Hispanic populace. About 60 percent of Hispanics are Bilingual to some degree and about 40 percent are dependent on either English or Spanish.18 | P a g e
  18. 18. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition As seen in Geoscape’s American Marketscape DataStream, 2011 Series, Mexicans comprise nearly 69% of the total U.S. Hispanic population.Of course, marketers active in the U.S. Hispanic market realize that the geographicdistribution of certain ethnic groups makes a “national” Latino advertising effortperhaps trickier than one may assume. Florida is home to many Cubans and PuertoRicans; New York is home to many Dominicans and Puerto Ricans. Yet each state hasseen a noticeable increase in its Mexican population, with Puebla natives found inQueens and agricultural regions of the Mid-Hudson Valley. Furthermore, pockets ofCentral Americans can be found across Miami-Dade County, FL while Peekskill, NY, inWestchester County, is a hub for Ecuadorian immigrants.19 | P a g e
  19. 19. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition2011: EARNINGS AND EXPENDITURES The median income of all U.S. Hispanics is greater than that of Blacks but less than Whites and Asians. However, the size of the Hispanic population makes this consumer group enticing and attractive to marketers.Hispanic spending is significant across a variety of major categories, thanks to theirrelative youth and larger-than-average household size. Total aggregate Hispanicconsumer spending for 2011 is over $593 Billion.Top categories include insurance companies, automotive and food/beverage.20 | P a g e
  20. 20. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition Hispanics consume more than the average American household in many categories.Furthermore, the continued rapid growth in the Hispanic population makes thisconsumer group simply important to underserve or altogether ignore. This suggestmarketers invest consistently—and perhaps at a much deeper level—in Hispanic mediathan ever before. The median age of Hispanics is 27.3 years, compared to 41.2 years for non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, life expectancy for U.S. Latinos is 84 years old, compared to 81 for non- Hispanic whites. Thus, in many if not most consumption categories the multicultural consumer is actually worth more, not less, than the non- Hispanic white household.21 | P a g e
  21. 21. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition22 | P a g e
  22. 22. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionTHE OPPORTUNITYDespite the size of the U.S. Hispanic market, advertising dollars devoted to Spanish-language media in 2009 represented less than 5% of the total advertising pie.Tony Ruiz, director of communications planning for New York-based Hispanic-focusedagency The Vidal Partnership, has been particularly vocal about the trickle of ad dollarsgoing to Spanish-language media."I think its disgusting that only 4.5% of media spending is going toward Hispanicconsumers," Ruiz said during a panel discussion at the B&C/Multichannel News HispanicTV Summit, held in September 2011. "I think its disgusting that we had to make a bigdeal out of the 2010 Census. Most organizations in the U.S. dont know how to fully valuethe Hispanic contribution to their business; its largely perceived as a secondarysegment of the population.”Chris Montenegro McGrath, vice president of sustainability and Latino marketing atKraft Foods, understands the importance of reaching Latinos. The company’s Hispanicad budget grew three-fold in 2011; she says the budget is 4.5% above the industryaverage.Some industry leaders have challenged Ruiz, saying that Hispanic marketers and adagencies must continue to pound away at the significance of the Latino consumer. Ifnot, they’ll continue to be overlooked. Thus, opportunity abounds for the company thatlearns and understands why Hispanic ad expenditure increases are so important for thebottom line: ROI growth.23 | P a g e
  23. 23. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition U.S.  Hispanic  population  vs.  Total  population  –  Top  50  DMAs  –  2011,  presented  by  Geoscape Hispanic Population Name Total Population (2011) (2011) Los Angeles 17,729,990 8,039,483 New York 20,977,155 4,707,737 Houston 6,417,076 2,272,478 Miami-Ft. Lauderdale 4,356,130 2,153,792 Chicago 9,708,757 2,010,692 Dallas-Ft. Worth 7,208,815 1,937,058 San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose 7,152,857 1,697,582 Phoenix (Prescott) 5,097,438 1,415,719 San Antonio 2,516,842 1,399,364 Harlingen-Weslaco-Brownsville-McAllen 1,298,618 1,175,927 Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto 4,082,972 1,100,323 Fresno-Visalia 1,979,196 1,072,798 San Diego 3,140,677 1,023,578 Denver 4,126,703 864,039 Washington, DC (Hagerstown) 6,502,200 846,445 El Paso (Las Cruces) 1,036,572 820,599 Philadelphia 8,030,208 809,600 Albuquerque-Santa Fe 1,917,235 808,668 Orlando-Daytona Beach-Melbourne 3,728,115 731,540 Tampa-St. Petersburg (Sarasota) 4,385,228 705,639 Atlanta 6,454,764 693,661 Las Vegas 2,038,402 603,176 Austin 1,930,884 596,009 Boston (Manchester) 6,380,432 532,754 Seattle-Tacoma 4,880,463 451,606 Tucson (Sierra Vista) 1,172,515 431,189 Bakersfield 773,844 409,734 Salt Lake City 3,021,907 399,546 Portland, OR 3,192,730 393,815 West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce 1,935,417 358,220 Corpus Christi 579,221 355,266 Monterey-Salinas 742,647 354,313 Hartford & New Haven 2,667,914 333,040 Raleigh-Durham (Fayetteville) 2,998,162 298,693 Yuma-El Centro 379,893 264,756 Laredo 271,354 259,803 Ft. Myers-Naples 1,193,162 251,367 Charlotte 3,029,279 251,117 Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-San Luis Obispo 700,321 242,988 Palm Springs 432,094 227,643 Yakima-Pasco-Richland-Kennewick 689,247 224,058 Waco-Temple-Bryan 1,016,687 223,455 Minneapolis-St. Paul 4,551,263 222,446 Milwaukee 2,319,488 220,749 Odessa-Midland 424,228 204,981 Colorado Springs-Pueblo 928,778 191,651 Oklahoma City 1,838,391 189,775 Detroit 4,821,460 189,649 Kansas City 2,453,482 187,217 Amarillo 545,386 181,32424 | P a g e
  24. 24. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionAGENCYHISPANIC VS. ‘SPANISH’: THE BATTLE EVOLVESHow marketers approach the Hispanic market is an ever-changing endeavor. Twentyyears ago, developing Spanish-language creative and investing in a media buy wasreason for celebration. Today, multi-pronged, 360-level brand connectivity initiativesincorporate English- and Spanish-language creative, mobile and digital initiatives, andproduct integration, among other things.Hispanic Market Overview talked to several advertising industry leaders about howthey’re adapting to the evolving marketplace. We open the discussion by asking IsaacMizrahi, SVP and Managing Director of Miami-based Alma, how advertisers shouldapproach the U.S. Hispanic market today compared to 2005.HMO: Spanish-language media remains very important for reaching the all Hispanicconsumers -- despite all the chatter about English-language preferences rising amonglarge groups of Latinos. Is the growing population of English-preferred and bilingualLatinos a major topic of discussion with your clients?Isaac Mizrahi: When discussing marketing opportunities with our clients, we suggest anapproach that recognizes that “culture is the new language” -- meaning that, first andforemost, brands should understand what makes their messages more relevant to theHispanic segment based on culture, behaviors and idiosyncrasies.However, it is important to recognize the important role the Spanish language plays andwill still play for years to come. Many studies, like the recently released The State of theHispanic Consumer: The Hispanic Market Imperative from Nielsen have shown thatSpanish not only plays a role as a communication asset to consumers, but mostimportantly as a cultural anchor, in particular to second and third-generation Hispanics.HMO: Bilingual. Bicultural. Youth and Young Adult. These are buzzwords among many.So where is the CMO and client going with respect to its Latino campaigns and focus?IM: In an era where the average CMO tenure is counted in months, not on years, it isimperative that any marketing program be focused on hard data -- not buzzwords. Wesuggest as a starting point an assessment of a companys source of sales growth. WhileHispanics represent 16% of the U.S. population, in some categories they represent asignificant share of the sales and, more importantly, an even higher share of the salesgrowth. That analysis will guide the CMO and his team in determining the right sub-segments to target within the diverse Hispanic market –including language preference,biculturalism and other categories of cultural affinity. As it is clear that the overalleconomic recovery will happen at a very slow pace, the companies that are leading25 | P a g e
  25. 25. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Editionthe pack in terms of sales growth are also the ones who are investing in the Hispanicmarket in a consistent and holistic way.HMO: You have a great perspective on English vs. Spanish with respect to media,lifestyle and culture. Many Hispanics between 21 and 43 years old areretroacculturating. In Miami WLTV-Channel 23s news is top-ranked, challenging Foxaffiliate WSVN-Channel 7. Both attract Hispanics -- but different types of Hispanics. Is thisemblematic of whats to come nationally?IM: I use an analogy that explains how the discussion around language sometimestends to be a bit superficial. As a fútbol fan, I can go to China by watching a whole local league game on TV despite the fact that I dont speak the language. At the same time, a “First and foremost, brands should understand National Hockey League game in Spanish wont what makes their messages more relevant to the make me more interested in the sport. The reality Hispanic segment based on culture, behaviors and is that several second-generation Young Latinos idiosyncrasies.” – Isaac Mizrahi, Alma (we call them “Fusionistas” at Alma) are looking for specific content in Spanish. That happens not only because they value Spanish as a culturalanchor, but also because the content they are looking for reflects who they are -- 100%American and 100% Latino.HMO: Digital and mobile initiatives are essential for all media growth in the 2010s andbeyond as platform-specific communication will soon be phased out, thanks to rapidchanges in how consumers digest entertainment. Please explain how agencies arestriving to meet client demand in reaching Latinos over smartphones, tablets, and thenext great mobile technology.IM: A couple of years ago we made the strategic decision to incorporate digital intoeverything we do. We eliminated the digital department, and incorporated digitalexperts inside all agency functions, like the “trios,” where planning, creative and digitalwork in an integrated way. Moreover, we guide our creation philosophy under thebelief that consumers are not only the end of our clients communication, but ratherindividual "broadcast towers" that can further enhance our message through their ownnetworks. Once you work based on these pillars you start leveraging the immensedigital possibilities as a core part of our ideas and not as extensions of our above theline creative.HMO: Even with new television networks and great ratings for Hispanic radio, Spanish-language media still struggles to get its share of the advertising pie while digital/mobiledollars are growing rapidly, percentage-wise. What are the challenges with increasingadvertiser activity and, ultimately, dollars -- even as Q4 2011 delivered strong results forHispanic media.26 | P a g e
  26. 26. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionIM: With 18 years of client-side experience and three years at an agency, I can highlighttwo major challenges. First, in most companies the process to allocate resources stillresembles a rear view mirror, looking for the past as a source of guidance oninvestment, rather than looking at sources of volume growth. Based on my observation,several companies still have this approach of “incrementalism” when it comes toHispanic market investment. They’ll say, "If I have the extra dollar I will allocate toHispanic marketing". How about starting from scratch and allocating resources basedon where your volume is coming from?Second, Spanish-language advertising doesnt mean Hispanic Marketing. Today themarketplace requires more sophisticated knowledge about the Hispanic segment, andwhen companies reduce their Hispanic marketing programs into a Spanish-languagemedia program or even an advertising program, their success will be limited. This maycreate a barrier for future investments.Isaac Mizrahi joined Alma in 2009. His previous experience includes roles as Director,Multicultural Marketing for Sprint Nextel and Marketing Communications InnovationManager for The Coca-Cola Company North America.27 | P a g e
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  28. 28. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionAGENCYTHE HISPANIC CONSUMER: CONSTANTLY HMO  ENTREVISTA  CROSSING CULTURES Bringing the client key information about the Latino consumer is paramount toTwo worlds, one individual. keeping them interested in Hispanic marketing and advertising, says CarlosToday’s Hispanic consumer is highly likely to not only Martinez, President of Conill, ashift between English and Spanish at a moment’s Hispanic-focused agency with offices innotice, but also between “Hispanic” and “total Miami’s Brickell District and the Southmarket” in an instant. Bay region of greater Los Angeles. Job One for Martinez and his team is to discussJorge Plasencia, CEO of Miami-based República, says the “total Hispanic” marketplace.his total market agency was launched with thisconcept instilled as a basic tenet. “There are definitely levels of acculturation, and when you look“We were one of the first agencies to use the term at language, language is a‘cross-cultural,’ and positioning ourselves as a cross- tactic,” he believes. “After thecultural agency was really the way to go,” he says of 2010 Census was released, thereRepública’s 2006 launch. “Here at the agency we are was talk that second- and third-really living in two worlds – with our media, our music, generation Hispanics may be moreand our language. That’s really where we are going comfortable being talked to in [as Hispanics], with English than Spanish. Our clients, and everyone else, are looking at people having that. If you want to win with any these two product and service, you really “In a market like Los seamless identities. have to look at that Hispanic Angeles, to reach that That is why segment – it is super-important.” 18-34 vibrant young reaching them in Latina, you’ve got to a culturally Conill has eyed the bilingual, advertise on KLVE but relevant way, bicultural Latino consumer for you’ve also got to more than six years, stepping out in regardless of 2006 with a Toyota commercial in advertise on KIIS-FM.” whether it is in both Spanish and English that aired – Jorge Plasencia, CEO, English or Spanish, during that year’s Super Bowl República is how we telecast. “That first ad, for the operate.” hybrid Toyota Camry, spoke to one key insight we found,” MartinezThat being said, Plasencia believes Spanish-language says. “We found that the vehiclemedia should represent “a big chunk of the buy.” He was similar to Hispanics, who gosays, “You hear a lot about how you can reach the back and forth between twoHispanic consumer today through a general-market languages. Hence, thebuy, but we feel that placement in both English and commercial showed a father andSpanish media is important.” son, speaking two languages, shown with a Camry that has two power sources.”29 | P a g e
  29. 29. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionIn fact, buying certain English-language media – in particular CHR/Pop radio stations –is very much a Hispanic buy in markets such as Los Angeles and Miami. “KIIS-FM and[WHYI] Y-100? Those stations are Hispanic, because they attract listeners who are Latino,and who live in two worlds. In a market like Los Angeles, to reach that 18-34 vibrantyoung Latina you’ve got to advertise on [Univision Radio’s Spanish Adult ContemporaryKLVE] K-Love but you’ve also got to advertise on KIIS-FM. You have to look at yourdollars and spend them in a way where you’re maximizing them and reaching peoplein both languages. If you are only on one of those stations you are missing the boat,because that person is continuously going back and forth between these stations.Al Quintana, EVP of Roar Media and publisher of The Digital Raindance, is the father ofthree teenagers who prefer to use English but love many things about their Hispanicheritage, and aren’t afraid to show it. “It’s as simple as dancing to salsa music whenthey go to a party,” he told attendees at a March 2012 MIT Enterprise Forum paneldiscussion held at the University of Miami. “My teens love to play dominos when withfriends or family. It is about our culture. At some point, maybe some of those culturaltraits will dissipate. But I’m not so sure about that.”Maribel Ferrer, a Hispanic public relations and communications expert at FleishmanHilliard, believes it is up to the madre to keep the cultural connection alive withHispanic kids and teens. “They are the keepers of the culture,” she says. “They are theones to keep the connection going.”30 | P a g e
  30. 30. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionAGENCY/ONLINE/PRSOCIAL MEDIA: THE HISPANIC HOT SPOT“The Latino consumer is hyperconnected, and the idea of the ‘cafecito break’became virtual by having a smartphone in our hands.”That’s the assessment of Xavier Mantilla, director of sales for Cisneros Company-ownedmobile advertising network RedMás. Speaking at a MIT Enterprise Forum paneldiscussion held in March 2012 at the University of Miami, Mantilla noted that 32% of allweb-based content is consumed from digital-based technology. As Hispanics overindexin their adoption of smartphone and tablet devices, they possess tremendous influenceover where digital media is heading.Culture plays a large role in this fast-adoption of digital platforms, including sociallyenabled Apps, says Fleishman Hilliard’s Maribel Ferrer. For marketers that wish toengage with the digitally minded Latino, Ferrer has one simple suggestion: Listen to yourcustomer. Tools such as Radian6 can serve as strong user intelligence tools, providingrich data on how Hispanics are using your digital platforms.How social media impacts online commerce should also be examined in the Hispanicspace, notes Roar Media’s Al Quintana. For instance, any website featuring a product,brand, service or good should be mobile-optimized, given the trend of Hispanicsaccessing the internet from a smartphone or tablet.Targeting Latinos through digital platforms should also be based on content, and not somuch on language. Mantilla believes many Hispanics have the luxury of picking andchoosing a language. With the rise in bilingual, bicultural Hispanics already being seenin the U.S. he firmly believes that “language is not about un solo idioma. It is about how Iam speaking to you.” Ferrer agrees. “Culture will be a unifier of Hispanics for years tocome.”Mantilla says marketers should look at two key things when looking at digital media, inparticular social networking platforms: • Ask where and/or how Hispanics are participating in social media • Determine how Hispanics are engaging in social media conversationsSocial media is used by many brands to connect to the Latino consumer in a very grass-roots way, chatting with them like a trusted friend over an afternoon coffee. ForQuintana, social media platforms are also perfectly designed to convert people towebsite users, driving traffic to an online destination center that remains highlyimportant despite a heightened focus on Apps.31 | P a g e
  31. 31. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionRepública’s Jorge Plasencia, in an interview for HMO FYI – República is set tothe Hispanic Market Overview, added, “We all expand with a Los Angeles-areaknow that Hispanics overindex with everything office, says CEO Jorgeonline, and the fact that social media is so Plasencia. He hopes torobust in our community is because it is ‘social’ accomplish this goal within the– a community that wants to stay in touch with next 12 months.family and friends and stay in touch withpeople right here or with someone in theirhome country.”That’s why many República clients are making social media an important part of theirHispanic strategy, coming to the agency with a much more robust team to developand execute content. At República, social media is an entirely separate group from itspublic relations division. “All they do all day long is research and coming up withcontent for social media,” Plasencia says.32 | P a g e
  32. 32. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionAGENCY/ONLINE/PRBRAND LEADERSHIP, ACROSS ALL PLATFORMSIn November 2011, a Houston-based independently owned Hispanic marketing agencytook time out to celebrate on Chicago’s Navy Pier. The occasion? The shop, LópezNegrete Communications, had been selected as the “Best Hispanic Agency UsingSocial Media to Reach Latinos” by Latinos in Social Media (LATISM) at its annual awardsgala.CEO Alex López Negrete points to the rapid embrace of smartphones and otherhandheld digital devices for his agency’s integration of social media into its creativeservices."The digital emergence of 13.5 million Latinos on Facebook and 8.1 million on Twitter,along with the emergence of an enormous community of Latino bloggers, hasrevolutionized the marketing landscape forever. Our clients brands are competing forthe moment and competing for relevance in a time when attention is a preciouscommodity. Hence, we have made it a strategic imperative to be an innovator in thisspace and to have the best people in the industry, setting models and standards in theuse of social media targeting Latinos.”The recent addition of Sandra Alfaro as Managing Director of Brand Leadership atLópez Negrete will likely further bolster the agency’s standing. The move also gives avote of confidence to the Hispanic advertising industry, as Alfaro joins LNC after a shortstint as head of Ramona, a now-shuddered Hispanic boutique with MDC Partners’Kirshenbaum Bond Senecal + Partners. Before that, Alfaro served as Director of AccountManagement at New York-based independent agency The Vidal Partnership. Alfaroworks alongside Julio Arrieta, who shares her duties.“We need to be that partner for the client that has the deep, unmatchedunderstanding of the Hispanic consumer audience,” Alfaro says. “Our goal is to be theextension of the client’s marketing team … and we have to earn it.”Alfaro believes the Hispanic-focused shop is important for CMOs charged withachieving ROI in their Latino marketing efforts. Why?“It is the passion, and dedication, and level of talent found at the Hispanic agency,”Alfaro says. “When Hispanic is the sole focus, there’s a difference. It matters when youwake up and all you eat and drink is your market. It really speaks to your level ofservice.”For digital, Lopez Negrete has drawn kudos for its social media efforts for Verizon (SomosVerizon FiOS on Facebook and @SomosFiOS on Twitter), and its interactive websitescreated for Verizon (www.EnciendeteFiOS.com), Sonic Drive-Ins33 | P a g e
  33. 33. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Edition(espanol.sonicdrivein.com), and Pernod Ricards Chivas Regal(www.nochesdebrotherhood.com).“Our knowledge is not read in a textbook or analyzing numbers,” Alfaro says. “It is in us,and we live it everyday. We all represent different acculturation segments, and you seeit walking around the office every day. It’s got to come from inside.”On the subject of English vs. Spanish, Alfaro prefers to take the conversation abovelanguage and to make it “about the mindset of the consumer,” thinking carefully abouthow to engage the consumer within the brand categories and touch points that mattermost for them. “For example, one can start the day with Spanish-language radio andwork all day speaking English,” she says. “We can engage in brands that are mostrelevant to our mindset at any given time.”Traditional advertising is an integral part of López Negrete’s activity. Yet digital “haspermeated every single aspect of marketing today,” Alfaro says. “In everything we dowe add a component that is digital in nature. It is a booming, robust area for theagency.”34 | P a g e
  34. 34. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionONLINETHE PORTAL: ADAPTING FOR ITS AUDIENCEIs the online hub – the portal – still relevant, given all of the discussion about Apps,smartphones and tablet use?Yes, and especially in the Hispanic market.Staying relevant with an ever-changingaudience, by delivering the right mix of content,is one of the reasons why portals such as “For entertainment andTerra.com continue to attract online Latinos. for information, mobile isFernando Rodriguez, CEO of Terra USA, notes now the primary device,that in the U.S., 64% of its audience is comprised because you always haveof second- and third-generation Latinos, with it with you.” – Fernandothe remainder first-generation Hispanics. “We Rodriguez, CEO, Terra USArecognize that our audience is very proud oftheir culture, and we understand who they areand that they live in two worlds,” he says.“We’re speaking to them in two languages.”While Terra.com’s calling card is relevant news, sports and entertainment content inSpanish, for U.S. audiences, Rodriguez says the integration of more English-languagecontent is a central part of Terra USA’s growth strategy. “I don’t want to define us as anEnglish-language portal or a Spanish-language portal. We want to cater to allHispanics. It’s not about Spanish, or English, or Spanglish – it is about understanding theconsumer and what is relevant to them.”How to the deliver the relevant content is a critical part of an evolution at Terra USA.While the portal remains a key audience driver, it has ensured that its content wasavailable through “all venues and through all screens” since 2006. One example ofTerra’s expansion to smartphones and tablets is its recently launched live interactivemusic platform. Built for a bilingual audience, the Toyota-sponsored platform offers livestreaming and real-time interaction with a given band. Miami-based pop fusion groupLocos Por Juana was the first act to participate; 40% of live streaming of the band’sshow was conducted through mobile devices, Rodriguez says.“This is not the next trend,” he notes. “It is happening right now. For entertainment andfor information, mobile is now the primary device, because you always have it withyou.”35 | P a g e
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  36. 36. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionDigital platforms also present a great opportunity for online media to gain additional addollars. “Before there was a challenge because the [comScore] numbers were not thatsignificant,” Rodriguez says. “But now all stakeholders in the market need to understandhow to leverage these digital platforms. We have reached a point where we havecritical mass, and we need to do a better job of monetizing that. The social arena isalso huge, and we need to use social networks to promote our content.”For Terra USA, the goal isn’t to have a lot of Facebook fans. Rather, it is about users ofthe social networking site to become familiar with Terra, through content promotion.“We see a significant click-through from Facebook and we’re looking for them toconnect back to Terra.com. Of course we want to have a conversation with peoplethrough these platforms. But we don’t want to have just passive fans. We want to havefans that contribute to the content and add to the experience. If you do not createengagement, and that conversation, you are not reaching your ultimate objective.”With all the push toward digitally savvy and bilingual, bicultural Hispanics, Terra willremain highly interested in attracting the first-generation Hispanic. “You shouldn’t ignorethe first generation,” Rodriguez says. “It will be a mistake to forget about them. Yes,we’re pushing English programming and not just for the sake of it. We’re talking aboutthings that matter to the consumer today. It is about understanding how the consumerwants content that is relevant to them, and how they want it delivered to them.” RadioLatino     What are the songs Hispanic radio listeners are most likely to hear on Spanish-language radio? Here’s a glance at the most-played current singles, year-to-date, as measured by Mediabase 24/7. REGIONAL MEXICAN: La Arrolladora Banda el Limon “Llamada de mi Ex” SPANISH CONTEMPORARY: Maná “El Verdadero Amor Perdona” TROPICAL (SALSA/BACHATA): Prince Royce “Las Cosas Pequeñas” REGGAETON/LATIN URBAN: Daddy Yankee “Lovumba” Copyright © 2012 Mediabase. All Rights Reserved.37 | P a g e
  37. 37. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionMEDIACULTURAL FLUENCY: WHAT MATTERS MOSTCesar Conde, President of Univision Networks, is fully aware of the increased use ofEnglish among Hispanics. He’s also among the ranks of industry veterans who believethat Spanish-language media will remain vital to reaching all Latino consumers for yearsto come.In an interview with Hispanic Market Overview, Conde discusses how the nation’sleading Spanish-language media company is overcoming any objections frompotential clients that believe hitting English-language media is suffice for meeting theirHispanic marketing needs.CESAR CONDE: The most effective way to reach Hispanics is in culture. More thanSpanish fluency, more than English fluency, cultural fluency is what is relevant. Latinoscrave aspects of their culture – food, holidays, music, media, and content - that reflecttheir roots, community, values, and aspirations.The culturally relevant content that exists in Spanish-language media – and is not readilyavailable in English – satisfies the appetite for Hispanic culture. We also know that 75% ofall Hispanics speak Spanish at home and that 42 out of the top 50 shows amongHispanic bilingual audiences are on Univision. Language is a powerful tool to use in thein-culture approach, and while some marketers believe they are effectively reachingHispanic consumers through English-language media, they are reaching English-dominant Hispanics, who are highly fragmented across English-language media. Thetop three English-language broadcast shows with Hispanics only deliver 8-10% ofHispanics within their audience, while Hispanics represent 19% of the U.S. population.HMO: English-language usage will continue to rise, and Hispanic media must recognizethis. What efforts are Univisions brands undertaking to welcome Latinos that may onlyuse Spanish with family and close friends, extending its relationship with third- andfourth-generation Latinos?CC: For Hispanics, Spanish is the language of the heart that maintains a strongconnection to the content, their country of origin, culture and community. In factbetween 1980 and 2007 the number of Spanish speakers in the U.S. grew by more than200%. We recognize that the Spanish-language opportunity will continue to grow, whichis why we remain committed to serving our audience in Spanish – and are expandingthose offerings through the launch of our three new 24-hour Spanish-language cablenetworks, which are focused on three of Hispanic America’s biggest passion points --novelas, sports, and news.38 | P a g e
  38. 38. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionThe fact remains that our content speaks to Hispanics. Because of our strong mix ofnovelas throughout the week and our powerful franchises such as [beauty competition]Nuestra Belleza Latina on Sunday nights, Univision has become a competitive playeramong the “Big 5 networks.”HMO: Digital and mobile initiatives are essential for all media growth in the 2010s andbeyond as platform-specific communication will soon be phased out thanks to rapidchanges in how consumers digest entertainment. How is Univision at the forefront ofreaching Latinos over smartphones, tablets, and other digital devices?CC: We know audiences are becoming more evolved every day, they are no longer asimple extension of television and radio – they’re interactive, they’re on the go, andthey are accessing content from different devices. We think it’s instrumental to providestellar content that features top-of-the-line personalities, artists and storylines, orexclusive elements that give users the chance to truly engage in something theycannot find anywhere else.Univision is spearheading efforts to makecontent available to the country’s fastest-growing consumer segment, across all In 2011 Univision was the No. 1platforms. We offer our audience culturally network among Adults 18-34relevant content, covering an array of passion more nights than any network,points – from sports, with live streaming of our except for Fox. Univision alsosoccer matches on UnivisionDeportes.com, to beat NBC 195 times amongmusic with our "Univision InStudio” sessions, Adults 18-49.which recently featured Paulina Rubio,We also reach Hispanics with social media. Social media has proven to be not just atwo-way conversation but has also enhanced the whole TV viewing experience. It has,in a sense, recreated the family and friends viewing experience in an interactive way.Our future will be largely centered on increasing our variety of interactive content andexpanding its distribution across different platforms, with an emphasis on communityand social media.HMO: Univision is expanding with new television networks. But is it too late to gaintraction in Spanish? Arent there already "enough" TV networks serving Spanish-preferredLatinos? These are questions asked by some, but with MundoFox launching and yourexpansion obviously there is a fallacy to these statements. Can more networks bringmore viewers and more dollars without diluting an already challenged market?CC: This is a very exciting time to be in media and in Hispanic media, specifically, asnew competitors pursue the opportunity. We see the increased attention to theHispanic consumer as a positive development. Competition is nothing new to us.Univision is a brand that is focused on innovation and on delivering the best available39 | P a g e
  39. 39. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Editioncontent for Hispanic America. Our relationship with Televisa gives us an enormouscompetitive advantage in the marketplace. Coupled with the strength of our brand,Univision continues to see growth. In fact, there are more than 100 Hispanic-focusedbroadcast and cable networks in the space and today.Media dollars have always followed the consumer. Today, Hispanics are at 50.5 millionin the U.S. and 54% of population growth in the next five years will be attributable toHispanics – that’s one in every four babies born in this country. By 2050 one in threeAmericans will be Hispanic. Numbers are the name of the game in media. Univision isworking to help marketers and agencies capitalize on the opportunity to drive saleswith Hispanics by simply shifting their media dollars to Univision. We recently launched amarketing campaign with a razor-sharp focus on this message to media decision-makers.HMO: How is Univision going after the bilingual, bicultural Hispanic audience? Should it?After all, theyre likely watching MTV, ABC, Fox, and ESPN in English, so why bother inSpanish, right? Or is that statement patently false?CC: Univision’s strongest demographic performance is among young Hispanic Adults18-34 years old. A growing portion of this demographic is bilingual. Yet even as theylearn English, the data show that these viewers choose to consume media in Spanish onUnivision. Delivering culturally relevant content to bilingual, bicultural Hispanics is thekey, and our numbers prove this. Against other networks, Univision’s audience has theyoungest media age (36.2) of any broadcast network regardless of language, whileABC (51.6), NBC (51.4), CBS (56.5) and FOX (44.4) continue to draw an older audiencebase during their broadcast prime.Cesar Conde oversees the Univision and TeleFutura broadcast television networks andsix Univision cable television networks: Galavisión, De Película, De Película Clásico,Bandamax, Ritmoson, Telehit and Clásico TV. He is also responsible for Univision Studios,created in December 2009 to build on the original programming produced by thecompany. From 2002-2003, he served as a White House Fellow for Secretary of StateColin Powell and prior to joining Univision served as vice president of businessdevelopment for starMedia.40 | P a g e
  40. 40. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionMEDIACROSS-PLATFORM VALUESSpanish-dominant and bilingual Hispanics are an integral part of the audience focus forTelemundo, the NBC Universal-owned rival to Univision. Dan Lovinger, EVP/Ad Sales forTelemundo Media, believes the network will continue to target Hispanics who craveSpanish-language programming for years to come. “We believe there is a lot ofopportunity to grow in Spanish,” he says.At the same time, Lovinger has his eyes set on attracting young Hispanics, regardless ofwhat language they prefer to use, to Mun2, NBCU’s Spanish-language cable televisionnetwork seen by many as the hipper younger cousin to Telemundo. “The median ageof the Mun2 audience is 26-29-years old, which well represents the median age of Hispanic America,” he says. “If you do your content right, they will come HMO FYI – Borja Perez has been and watch it,” he says. Speaking of Telemundo, promoted to to senior vice Lovinger adds, “Our growth isn’t due to any president of digital and social one program this year. We’re up in every hour media at Telemundo. He in prime-time. We have made improvements to continues to report to EVP/Digital our live specials and award shows [including Media and Emerging Business the recent Premios Billboard] and added non- Peter Blacker. Telemundo in 2011 fiction programming. I think there is some room enjoyed double-digit digital ad for reality television, and I don’t think it’s going revenue growth. to replace novelas. But I would not be surprised if I saw more reality programming in the future.”Digital media, along with social media, are platforms now being packaged by thenetwork to further attract those twentysomethings to Telemundo and Mun2. “Ourphilosophy is that we want our content to be everywhere,” Lovinger says. This hasresulted in a launch of smartphone Apps devoted to novelas and sports.“We had interest in these Apps from Day One, and now we are gathering the ROI dataand putting something together,” Lovinger says. The tools are used to driveengagement in the most efficient ways possible.“We are using social media for a number of purposes, but first and foremost it is apromotional tool for us,” he continues. “Before the launch of our 10pm telenovela,‘Relaciones Peligrosas,’ we knew there were ways the young characters could self-promote themselves. So we enabled the cast to be catalysts by taking to socialmedia.”41 | P a g e
  41. 41. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionStill, Telemundo is taking a cautious approach to fawning over Facebook. “If you have500,000 followers, what do you do with that?” Lovinger asks. “You have to publish onFacebook everyday, and it almost becomes a liability rather than a benefit if you arenot actively populating the page with stories.”At day’s end, Lovinger is most pleased about continued growth in viewership atTelemundo, in particular among adults 18-49. “We’re up no matter how you slice it. Weused to have a 25 share total-day and we’re now a 29 share total-day for thebroadcast season. Consequently, people reward you for that.”Going into the 2012-13 Upfronts, Lovinger hopes those people represent potential andreturning advertisers.MEDIATR3S: ‘A BRIDGE BETWEEN TWO WORLDS’“Language does not capture the uniqueness of the Hispanic audience.”That’s the view of Charlie Singer, SVP of Content and Creative for Tr3s, Viacom’s U.S.Hispanic cable network originally conceived as MTV en Español. While Tr3s has shed the“MTV” brand, it has much of the essence of its English-language sibling. New seriesinclude “Quiero My Baby,” a reality series sponsored by Target spotlighting biculturalparents as they tackle parenthood; the Mexican novela “Bienvenida Realidad,” asuccess on Cadena Tres that deals with the pressures and intolerances of adolescence;and “The Ricardo Laguna Project,” a look inside the amusing life of BMX star RicardoLaguna as he attempts to break three world records and start his own family businesswhile balancing his close-knit Latino family and life in Las Vegas.It’s not your parent’s Hispanic television network.“Our bilingual, bicultural audience comes to Tr3s because our brand attributes speakdirectly to who they are, and in a very different way than the English- and Spanish-dominant networks,” Singer says. “Tr3s is the bridge between the two worlds, and ouroriginal content is our best asset for filling the void among these networks. There arecertain aspects of the bilingual audience that are Spanish-dominant and others thatare more acculturated and English-dominant. Understanding this is key to creatingeffective and engaging content for this audience.”Bilingual in its approach, Singer says Tr3s’ language choices are dependent on multiplevariables from show formats and content to genre and the generations of its audience.“Our viewers under 30 years old are more English-dominant in their day-to-day lives but42 | P a g e
  42. 42. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Editionmore Spanish-dominant at home with their parents and grandparents. It’s important tounderstand the full spectrum of this audience’s reality.”In fact, focusing on language is missing the point, Singer says. “Yes, there are limitlesschoices when it comes to content that engages this audience, but our audiencecomes to Tr3s because we deliver authenticity vs. language. They’re more likely towatch Tr3s’ ‘Quiero Mi …’ franchise over the stereotypes on [sitcoms like] CBS’ ‘Rob.’”Many Tr3s viewers are digital and mobile technology innovators. Singer says Tr3s iscertainly aware of the robust opportunity to approach this group of consumers on theirhand-held device.“We’re developing more user-generated content across multiple vehicles, includingsocial media and mobile,” Singer says. A new Quiero Mis Quinces App is now available.“We’re also strengthening our strategic partnerships with AOL Latino andOurstage.com, which reaches a community of 17 million music fans and new artists. Weare also exploring new opportunities with key players such as Spotify and ImpreMedia,among others.”New television networks, from MundoFox to Univision’s niche cable networks, seek toadd more viewers and attract more advertisers to Spanish-language television, whichalready receives the bulk of Hispanic ad dollars. How does Tr3s fit in to this growth,especially as discussion continues about the growth of bilingual, bicultural Latinos thatseemingly prefer English-language media?Singer comments, “The new and existing Spanish-dominant platforms will certainly facesome challenges in the coming years, given the idle economy and decline inimmigration. The future is the bilingual-bicultural audience, given they’re the fastestgrowing segment of this population. Tr3s’ research study, Death of the Hispanic AdultDemo as We Know It, reinforces the need for Hispanic marketers and industries todevelop strategies that target that bilingual-bicultural viewer, specifically. It will beinteresting to see the shift in strategy.”43 | P a g e
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  44. 44. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionSPORTSA KEY CONNECTOR TO LATINO CONSUMERSBrands have ample opportunities to connect with a fervent, passionate group ofHispanic men and women – the sports fan. From soccer to boxing to NFL, NBA, MajorLeague Baseball and mixed martial arts, Latinos love sports.In fact, the Hispanic thirst for sports programming seemingly can’t be quenched. OnApril 7, 2012, Univision launched “Univision Deportes,” a 24/7 network devoted to sportsavailable exclusively to Dish Network subscribers. With a fútbol-heavy slate that includesMexican Premier League and Major League Soccer matches and studio highlightshows featuring Univision talent such as Fernando Fiore, Univision Deportes iscomplemented by “Univision Deportes Dos” – also launched April 7 exclusively forDishLATINO subscribers. “Dos” will feature 10 exclusive broadcasts of Mexican Leaguesoccer matches, through its partnership with Televisa, in addition to encorepresentations of Univision Deportes programming.Univision has set its sights on taking at least a nibble of the audience – and ad dollars –that currently go to such cable television networks as GolTV, Fox Deportes and ESPNDeportes.Mario Fraticelli, Director of Content for Digital and Manager of Social Media for ESPNDeportes, and Oscar Ramos, Senior Director and General Manager for ESPN DeportesRadio and ESPN Deportes Digital, participated in a round-table discussion with HispanicMarket Overview editor Adam R Jacobson to discuss what’s driving the Hispanic sportsfan, and how ESPN Deportes continues to innovate through digital and mobileplatforms, in addition to its mix of programming.HMO: Content delivery is more than just a television network or videos on a website,especially with Hispanic sports fans who more than ever are using mobile devices tostay apprised of the latest news and features. How is ESPN Deportes reaching thesefans?Oscar Ramos: The mantra that ESPN that has always lived by is to serve the sports fan inany way, shape, or form through the most convenient delivery vehicle or screen. That’snot just our mission statement: We live by this on a day-to-day basis.HMO: We hear more and more about the bilingual, bicultural Hispanic, in particularamong younger men. How is ESPN Deportes addressing this growth?Mario Fraticelli: We are focused on Spanish-language content, but we also know howto speak Spanglish. The median age of the ESPN Deportes consumer is 34. We want toapproach a younger group.45 | P a g e
  45. 45. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionHMO: How is ESPN Deportes accomplishing this?MF: Through social media. We’re doing this that allow for more flexibility, and allow fansto interact with the content.ESPN Los Angeles is producing content that is in Spanglish. We just launched a four-partvideo series where we sat down with colleagues from the English side of ESPN andproduced a Spanglish version of the web series Born + Raised. For ESPN Deportes wesent Chuey Martinez, a presenter on Viacom’s Tr3snetwork and a KIIS-FM/Los Angeles DJ, to SpringTraining in Arizona. It’s humorous, and talks about how GOL SCOREDto get in shape and what the “MLB look” is. IN GOTHAMOR: This is all a work in progress for us. We take a step ESPN Deportes Radio willback every single day and analyze how the fan debut on AM 1050 in theexperience was compared to yesterday. As their New York metropolitan areaneeds or specific appetite for specific content this September, thanks to anchanges, we need to respond to those changes. That arrangement between Theinvolves both intuition and our own research, Walt Disney Company andinteracting with our own fans through social media. Emmis Communications thatWe can interact and see instantly how the audience shifts the English-languagereacts. “ESPN 1050” to WRKS-FM 98.7. ESPN Deportes RadioHMO: Mario, what are you learning from social recently added a Chicagomedia? signal – an FM translator atMF: We are learning a lot about fan behavior. My 97.5 that covers a majority of the market’s Hispanicpriority is to drive traffic to the website. For example,the fan is telling us during the game – a big game like population.[the April 21, 2012 Barcelona vs. Real Madrid “Súper ESPN Deportes Radio roundsClasico” match] – to go to our website with out its reach in the top 10commentary. That’s one-way communication, with no U.S. Hispanic markets, andparticipation. Now, fan behavior is telling us that they currently has 45 affiliatesgo to watch the game on ESPN Deportes but they’re nationwide.going to be chatting on Twitter. The result: Having ahash tag on Twitter. That’s how we can adapt to whatthe fan does.  HMO: Is there a plan to monetize social media platforms ESPN Deportes is using?OR: ESPN Deportes has a “total media” approach – It’s not just social media, it is howsocial media interacts with our linear terrestrial network, magazines and mobileplatform. We don’t necessary have a specific campaign or strategy by platform. We46 | P a g e
  46. 46. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 Editionreally try to say to the advertiser that one workswith the other, and the idea here is that you buy FOX Deportes has partneredinto that approach, and that you’re going to with boxing promotionalreach the fan in different ways. company Golden Boy Promotions that allows theDigital is still a bit challenging, but it is starting to Spanish-language cablechange, in terms of results and being able to television sports network to air adeliver results to our advertisers. It is still in the monthly U.S.-based boxing‘new media’ arena, and a lot of advertisers are event produced exclusively forstill not convinced of its effectiveness. We strive the network. Two live boxingto prove to them that it is successful and events from cities throughouteffective and when combined with other media Mexico are included in thecan become robust and efficient. agreement, which gives FOX Deportes broadcast rights toMF: Right now we have a campaign running on classic fights from Golden BoyTV, and on digital and social media, for Gillette. Promotions’ library.Every morning I post who delivered the best goalin La Liga over the weekend; this is presented byGillette. This is part of the whole package.HMO: What else makes ESPN Deportes different, given the ever-growing competition?OR: Fans tell us we’re very unique in how we are committed to the sports world. Wefocus on being able to bring the best research, journalistic approach, commentary anddebates to what we offer and really present sports in a very compelling way. Beyondthe play-by-play, it is really that game around the game.Play-by-play is very important, but equally important is the ability to interact with ourexperts and debating with some of the other experts on our staff. I think there arealways challenges, and I think that is what makes us better and what makes us stronger– to not be complacent with what we’ve got and to always take what we want andmake it better.HMO: What’s the biggest change from 2005 that you can share?OR: The acculturation level of Hispanics. Nobody is surprised that it has happened, butperhaps we’re a little surprised at the speed that acculturation has happened. Ourbiggest benefit is being able to quickly react to that.MF: I spent 2000 to 2006 with Univision.com and we were so concerned about the purityof the Spanish content. Now, Spanglish and bilingualism are being used because of thechanging nature of the youth market. It simply gives us more flexibility in the productionof content and how we approach the fan.47 | P a g e
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  48. 48. HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW, presented by López Negrete 2012 EditionSYNDICATED RADIO PROGRAMMINGMUSIC, TALK, AND LOTS OF GOALSMany radio stations pride themselves on their strong lineup of presenters. Others struttheir stuff with their music, or sports programming.The syndicated radio network is largely responsible for delivery of these shows. In theU.S. Hispanic market, Fútbol de Primera Radio and GLR Networks are among the primarydistributors of sports programming, general-interest talk shows and, in the case of GLR, agrowing variety of music-oriented programs.Such offerings are important not only for independently operated Spanish-languageradio stations, but also their listeners. Spanish-language radio stations educate, inform,and entertain a large segment of media consumers who prefer to engage inprogramming that uniquely speaks to them. Even as the percentage of English-preferred Latinos continues to rise, consumption of Spanish-language radio remainsstrong - and is predicted to stay this way for many years. Stations offering Spanish-language syndicated programming are a vital part of Hispanic radios long-termgrowth.Sports – soccer, in particular – is a primary component of what syndicators offer toSpanish-language AM and FM stations in the U.S. The reason, notes Fútbol de Primerachairman Andres Cantor, is simple. “Hispanics prefer to listen to soccer in its nativelanguage, and with the special flavor only the best announcers can give the game.Soccer is about the passion, and Hispanics will always relate to play-by-play in theirlanguage, with the broadcasters that can reciprocate the feelings of the listeners.”Fútbol de Primera has been FIFA’s U.S. broadcast partner for World Cup radio coveragesince 2002, and has agreements in place through the 2022 games. It also offers shoulderprogramming including the Cantor-hosted Fútbol de Primera Show, which airs daily andcovers the world of soccer. FDP Radio isn’t just about fútbol – the network also offersdaily vignettes and our lifestyle program "Casos y Cosas de Collins," hosted by MariaAntonieta Collins.GLR Networks is also widely known for its sports programming, with a growing list ofaffiliates for its play-by-play of Mexican Premier League squad Chivas de Guadalajaraand 11 other Fútbol Liga Mexicana teams. There’s also a weekday sports update of 2 ½minutes in length offered five times each day, and a 60-second sports update deliveredsix times each weekday to meet the demand of the Hispanic sports fan.But GLR’s growth is also coming from non-sports programming. In 2011 En Voz Alta conMaria Celeste was added to the lineup, and the 2 ½ minute vignette airs up to threetimes daily on roughly 50 affiliates. Luis Gutierrez, VP and Director of National Advertising49 | P a g e

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