Comparative & Superative

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A presentation of the grammar rules of compartives and superative.

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Comparative & Superative

  1. 1. Comparatives & Superlatives <ul><li>Two or less-syllable adjectives ending in -y we have -ier and -iest </li></ul>Health iest Health ier Healthy Prett iest Prett ier Pretty Superlative form Comparative form Root form
  2. 2. Comparatives & Superlatives (cont'd) <ul><li>Two or less -syllable adjectives ending in an unstressed vowel normally have –er and –est </li></ul>Bigg est Bigg er Big Cheap est Cheap er Cheap Superlative form Comparative form Root form
  3. 3. Comparatives & Superlatives (cont’d) <ul><li>Three or more syllable adjectives have more/less and most/least in front </li></ul>Most/Least wonderful More/Less wonderful Wonderful Most/Least comfortable More/Less comfortable Comfortable Most/Least successful More/Less successful Successful Superlative form Comparative form Root form
  4. 4. Comparative & Superlatives (cont'd) <ul><li>adjectives formed with -ing and -ed and those ending in -ious and -ful form we have more/less and most/least </li></ul>Most/Least beautiful More/Less beautiful Beautiful Most/Least interested More/Less interested Interested Most/Least boring More/Less boring Boring Superlative form Comparative form Root form
  5. 5. Comparatives & Superlatives (cont’d) <ul><li>Usages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comparative form + than Eg. The Kowloon-Canton Clock Tower is taller than The Central Star Ferry Clock Tower. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More/less + comparative form + than Eg. The scenary at The Peak is more beautiful than Repulse Bay’s. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As + root form + as Eg. The wax museum is as big as the space museum. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Comparatives & Superlatives (cont’d) <ul><li>Special: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Like – when two things have something in common one can use this structure instead of as + root form + as Eg. I am like a sheep. What I am saying is there are some characteristics I have in common with a sheep. In this case I am saying I am innocent and gentle. </li></ul></ul>

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