Coding In Public<br />Alan Stevens<br />or If You’re Gonna’ Suck, Do It With Gusto!<br />
Who is Alan Stevens?<br />Microsoft Most Valuable Professional<br />ASP Insider<br />Occasional Blogger http://netcave.org...
June 26th – 27th 2009<br /><ul><li>Knoxville, TN
Regional Speakers / Open Spaces
.NET, Java, Ruby, Erlang, more
Call for speakers – March 31
3 & 6 hour sessions on Friday
1 hour sessions on Saturday
http://CodeStock.org
http://twitter.com/CodeStock</li></li></ul><li>DevLink<br />August 13-15, 2009 Nashville, TN<br />www.devlink.net<br />
I am a failed educator.<br />
“I never stopped trying to become qualified for the job.”<br />Darwin Smith, <br />CEO of Kimberly Clark<br />
Dreyfus Stages of Skill Acquisition<br />Novice<br />Advanced Beginner<br />Competent<br />Proficient<br />Expert<br />
Novice<br />Rigid adherence to taught rules or plans<br />Little situational perception<br />No discretionary judgment<br />
Advanced Beginner<br />Guidelines for action based on attributes or aspects<br />Situational perception is still limited<b...
Competent<br />Sees action at least partially in terms of longer-term goals<br />Conscious, deliberate planning<br />Stand...
Proficient<br />Sees situation holistically rather than in terms of aspects<br />Sees what is most important in a situatio...
Expert<br />No longer relies on rules, guidelines, or maxims<br />Intuitive grasp of situations based on deep tacit unders...
Where We Stand<br />Expert<br />Proficient<br />Competent<br />Advanced Beginner<br />Novice<br />Source: Hackos & Stevens...
"The vast majority of all users remain advanced beginners, performing the tasks they need and learning new tasks as the ne...
You can write COBOL in any language.<br />
Everybody works, but not everybody improves.<br />WHY?<br />
The Mastery Curve<br />
The Dabbler<br />
The Obsessive<br />
The “Hacker”<br />
After moving up a level, things always get worse.<br />
Zones of Comfort<br />
Comfort Zone<br />People stay here<br />Minds often closed to learning<br />Very little change<br />
Learning Zone<br />Lots of Uncertainty<br />Feels uncomfortable<br />and challenging<br />Lots of learning opportunities<b...
Panic Zone<br />People close up<br />They freeze<br />They don’t learn<br />Very little focus on change and improvement – ...
The Fast Horse?<br />
What is expertise?<br />Performance consistently superior to peers<br />Produces concrete results<br />Can be replicated<b...
Recipe For Greatness<br />Intensive practice<br />Devoted teachers<br />Enthusiastic support<br />
Deliberate Practice is Designed<br />
Deliberate practice focuses on tasks beyond your current level of competence and comfort.<br />
It is only by working at what you can’t do that you become an expert<br />
Observe results and make adjustments<br />
Assess mistakes and figure out how to correct them<br />
Be honest about areas for improvement<br />
Practice without attention to reflection and form will not yield the same results.<br />
Deliberate practice is not “fun”, but it is rewarding.<br />
Flow requires challenge or boredom results.<br />
“If you practice with your fingers, no amount is enough. If you practice with your head, two hours is plenty.”<br />Violin...
10,000 hours to mastery<br />4-6-10<br />4 hours/day<br />6 days/week<br />For 10 years!<br />
How can we encourage greatness(or at least improvement)?<br />Be supportive of efforts to improve<br />Allow one another t...
Provide a supportive environment<br />
Be willing to be a mentor<br />
Be willing to receive constructive, unsentimental feedback<br />
Remember the Kobayashi Maru<br />
Simulations and Case Studies<br />Code Kata<br />Code Dojo<br />Bitslingers<br />“Code Sparring”<br />
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Coding In Public

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Coding In Public

  1. 1. Coding In Public<br />Alan Stevens<br />or If You’re Gonna’ Suck, Do It With Gusto!<br />
  2. 2. Who is Alan Stevens?<br />Microsoft Most Valuable Professional<br />ASP Insider<br />Occasional Blogger http://netcave.org<br />An Enthusiast NOT an expert!<br />
  3. 3. June 26th – 27th 2009<br /><ul><li>Knoxville, TN
  4. 4. Regional Speakers / Open Spaces
  5. 5. .NET, Java, Ruby, Erlang, more
  6. 6. Call for speakers – March 31
  7. 7. 3 & 6 hour sessions on Friday
  8. 8. 1 hour sessions on Saturday
  9. 9. http://CodeStock.org
  10. 10. http://twitter.com/CodeStock</li></li></ul><li>DevLink<br />August 13-15, 2009 Nashville, TN<br />www.devlink.net<br />
  11. 11. I am a failed educator.<br />
  12. 12. “I never stopped trying to become qualified for the job.”<br />Darwin Smith, <br />CEO of Kimberly Clark<br />
  13. 13. Dreyfus Stages of Skill Acquisition<br />Novice<br />Advanced Beginner<br />Competent<br />Proficient<br />Expert<br />
  14. 14. Novice<br />Rigid adherence to taught rules or plans<br />Little situational perception<br />No discretionary judgment<br />
  15. 15. Advanced Beginner<br />Guidelines for action based on attributes or aspects<br />Situational perception is still limited<br />All attributes and aspects are treated separately and given equal importance<br />
  16. 16. Competent<br />Sees action at least partially in terms of longer-term goals<br />Conscious, deliberate planning<br />Standardized and routinized procedures<br />Plan guides performance as situation evolves<br />
  17. 17. Proficient<br />Sees situation holistically rather than in terms of aspects<br />Sees what is most important in a situation<br />Perceives deviations from the normal pattern<br />Uses maxims, whose meanings vary according to the situation, for guidance<br />Situational factors guide performance as situation evolves<br />
  18. 18. Expert<br />No longer relies on rules, guidelines, or maxims<br />Intuitive grasp of situations based on deep tacit understanding<br />Intuitive recognition of appropriate decision or action <br />Analytic approaches used only in novel situations or when problems occur<br />
  19. 19. Where We Stand<br />Expert<br />Proficient<br />Competent<br />Advanced Beginner<br />Novice<br />Source: Hackos & Stevens, 1997 via the Pragmatic Programmers<br />
  20. 20. "The vast majority of all users remain advanced beginners, performing the tasks they need and learning new tasks as the need arises, but never acquiring a more broad-based, conceptual understanding of the task environment" <br />Hackos & Stevens, 1997, p. 36<br />
  21. 21. You can write COBOL in any language.<br />
  22. 22. Everybody works, but not everybody improves.<br />WHY?<br />
  23. 23. The Mastery Curve<br />
  24. 24. The Dabbler<br />
  25. 25. The Obsessive<br />
  26. 26. The “Hacker”<br />
  27. 27. After moving up a level, things always get worse.<br />
  28. 28. Zones of Comfort<br />
  29. 29. Comfort Zone<br />People stay here<br />Minds often closed to learning<br />Very little change<br />
  30. 30. Learning Zone<br />Lots of Uncertainty<br />Feels uncomfortable<br />and challenging<br />Lots of learning opportunities<br />
  31. 31. Panic Zone<br />People close up<br />They freeze<br />They don’t learn<br />Very little focus on change and improvement – it’s all about survival<br />
  32. 32. The Fast Horse?<br />
  33. 33. What is expertise?<br />Performance consistently superior to peers<br />Produces concrete results<br />Can be replicated<br />
  34. 34. Recipe For Greatness<br />Intensive practice<br />Devoted teachers<br />Enthusiastic support<br />
  35. 35. Deliberate Practice is Designed<br />
  36. 36. Deliberate practice focuses on tasks beyond your current level of competence and comfort.<br />
  37. 37. It is only by working at what you can’t do that you become an expert<br />
  38. 38. Observe results and make adjustments<br />
  39. 39. Assess mistakes and figure out how to correct them<br />
  40. 40. Be honest about areas for improvement<br />
  41. 41. Practice without attention to reflection and form will not yield the same results.<br />
  42. 42. Deliberate practice is not “fun”, but it is rewarding.<br />
  43. 43. Flow requires challenge or boredom results.<br />
  44. 44. “If you practice with your fingers, no amount is enough. If you practice with your head, two hours is plenty.”<br />Violin Professor Leopold Auer<br />
  45. 45. 10,000 hours to mastery<br />4-6-10<br />4 hours/day<br />6 days/week<br />For 10 years!<br />
  46. 46. How can we encourage greatness(or at least improvement)?<br />Be supportive of efforts to improve<br />Allow one another to suck (with gusto!)<br />Be a mentor<br />Catalog simulations and case studies<br />
  47. 47. Provide a supportive environment<br />
  48. 48. Be willing to be a mentor<br />
  49. 49. Be willing to receive constructive, unsentimental feedback<br />
  50. 50. Remember the Kobayashi Maru<br />
  51. 51.
  52. 52. Simulations and Case Studies<br />Code Kata<br />Code Dojo<br />Bitslingers<br />“Code Sparring”<br />
  53. 53. Greatness is not a function of circumstances. Greatness, as it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice.<br />Jim Collins in Good to Great<br />
  54. 54.
  55. 55.
  56. 56.
  57. 57. Papers & Articles<br />Expertise and Skilled Performance<br />The Making of an Expert<br />What It Takes to be Great<br />
  58. 58. In order to become an expert, you must become eccentric.<br />
  59. 59. Those who know do not speak;Those who speak do not know.<br />Tao Te Ching, Chapter 56<br />
  60. 60. Thanks For Listening!<br />Email/IM: alanstevens@gmail.com<br />Blog: http://netcave.org<br />Twitter: @alanstevens<br />

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