Mumps
Prof. Dr. Saad S Al Ani
Senior Pediatric consultant
Head of Pediatric Department
Khorfakkan hospital
Sharjah .UAE
sa...
Definition


Mumps is an acute viral infection of
 childhood that typically involves swelling of
 one or both parotid gla...
Etiology

Mumps virus, the cause of mumps, is an
 RNA virus of the genus Rubulavirus in
 the Paramyxoviridae family , whi...
Epidemiology
 Mumps is endemic in most unvaccinated
   populations
 The virus is spread from human reservoir by ;
      ...
Epidemiology (cont.)

 Before introduction of the vaccine in 1967:
  * the peak incidence of the disease occurred in
    ...
Epidemiology (cont.)


 Outbreaks appear to be primarily related
 to a lack of immunization, especially in an
 underimmun...
Epidemiology (cont.)
In the United States, the reported
 incidence of mumps declined after the
 introduction of mumps vac...
Reported cases of mumps infection per 100 000 population, 1978–2003. (Data from Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention...
Number of reported cases of mumps by year – United States, 1980–2006. Data for

2005 and 2006 are provisional. MMR, measle...
Epidemiology (cont.)
 Virus has been isolated from saliva as long as 6
  days before and up to 9 days after appearance
  ...
Pathogenesis


 After entry into the last and initial
 multiplication in the cells of the respiratory
 tract, the virus i...
Clinical Manifestations
 The incubation period ranges from 14-24 days, with a
  peak at 17-18 days.
 Approximately 30-40...
Clinical Manifestations (cont.)

*Common complaints are:
         Earache on the side of parotid
                   invol...
Clinical Manifestations (cont.)
The swollen parotid gland lifts the earlobe
 upward and outward, and the angle of the
 ma...
Toddler with mumps parotitis
                               (Courtesy of A. Margileth.)




8/30/2010       Mumps Prof. Sa...
Clinical Manifestations (cont.)


 Other salivary glands such as the
 submandibular and sublingual glands may
 also be in...
Clinical Manifestations (cont.)

Systemic symptoms, including fever,
 usually resolve within 3 to 5 days
 the parotid sw...
Diagnosis
 The diagnosis of mumps parotitis is usually
  apparent from the clinical symptoms and physical
  examination
...
Diagnosis (cont.)
The microbiologic diagnosis is by serology
 or virus culture
Enzyme immunoassay for mumps
 immunoglobu...
Diagnosis (cont.)

Mumps virus can be cultured from the
 saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, blood, urine,
 brain, and other inf...
DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS
The differential diagnosis of parotitis is broad and includes:
 bacterial (suppurative) parotitis
...
Boy with parotitis not due to mumps
virus. (Courtesy of J.H. Brien.)




8/30/2010       Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani   22
  ...
Treatment
There is no specific antiviral therapy;
 treatment is entirely supportive.
 Antipyretics (acetaminophen or ibu...
Treatment (cont.)


 Orchitis should be treated with local
 support and bed rest.
Mumps arthritis may respond to a 2-wk
...
Complications
 MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS
  1.The most frequent complication in childhood
   2. Clinical manifestations occ...
Complications
 MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS (cont.)

       5. may be either:
         I. Primary infection of neurons:
     ...
Complications
 MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS (cont.)

      *Mumps meningoencephalitis is clinically
       indistinguishable ...
Complications (cont.)
 ORCHITIS AND EPIDIDYMITIS

       1.These complications rarely occur in prepubescent
          boy...
Complications
 ORCHITIS AND EPIDIDYMITIS (cont.)
     5.The onset is usually abrupt, with a rise in
        temperature, ...
Complications (cont.)

OOPHORITIS
 Pelvic pain and tenderness are noted in
 about 7% of postpubertal female patients.
 Th...
Complications (cont.)

PANCREATITIS
  * Mild or subclinical pancreatic involvement is common, but
    severe pancreatitis...
Complications (cont.)
 MYOCARDITIS
     *Serious cardiac manifestations are extremely
        rare
      * mild infection...
Complications (cont.)
ARTHRITIS
   * Migratory polyarthralgia and even arthritis are
    occasionally seen in adults with...
Complications (cont.)

THYROIDITIS
  * It is uncommon in children
  * A diffuse, tender swelling of the thyroid
    may o...
Complications (cont.)

DEAFNESS
             * Unilateral, rarely bilateral, nerve
               deafness may occur
    ...
Complications (cont.)

OCULAR COMPLICATIONS
   * Dacryoadenitis may occur with painful
     swelling, usually bilateral, ...
Prognosis

The prognosis of mumps in childhood is
 excellent.
 Infection usually confers permanent
 immunity
 Reinfecti...
Prevention
 Mumps vaccine is derived from the Jeryl Lynn strain of
  mumps virus,
 The vaccine induces antibody in 96% o...
Prevention (cont.)
 Women should avoid becoming pregnant for 30 days
  after monovalent mumps vaccination (3 mo if vaccin...
Prevention (cont.)

Children who have not previously received
 the second dose should be immunized by
 11-12 yr of age.
...
Key Changes in 2006 Recommendations
for Mumps Vaccine
 ACCEPTABLE PRESUMPTIVE EVIDENCE OF
  IMMUNITY
    Documentation of...
Key Changes in 2006 Recommendations
for Mumps Vaccine (Cont.)
ROUTINE VACCINATION FOR
 HEALTHCARE WORKERS
          Perso...
Key Changes in 2006 Recommendations
for Mumps Vaccine
FOR OUTBREAK SETTINGS
           Children aged 1–4 years and adults...
Summary
 Mumps is an acute viral infection involves swelling of one or both
  parotid glands
 Mumps is an RNA virus of t...
Summary
 the opening of the Stensen duct on the buccal mucosa is edematous
  and erythematous.
 submandibular and sublin...
References
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : Updated
  recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunizat...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Mumps

8,679 views

Published on

definition ,cause ,presentation ,diagnosis ,treatment ,prevention ,vaccination

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
27 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
8,679
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
654
Comments
0
Likes
27
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Mumps

  1. 1. Mumps Prof. Dr. Saad S Al Ani Senior Pediatric consultant Head of Pediatric Department Khorfakkan hospital Sharjah .UAE saadsalani@yahoo.com
  2. 2. Definition Mumps is an acute viral infection of childhood that typically involves swelling of one or both parotid glands, although many different organs can be infected. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Control and Elimination of Mumps. Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep MMWR 2006; 55:366-368 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 2 khorfakkan Hospital
  3. 3. Etiology Mumps virus, the cause of mumps, is an RNA virus of the genus Rubulavirus in the Paramyxoviridae family , which also includes the parainfluenza viruses. Only one serotype is known 1.Johansson B, Tecle T, Orvell C: Proposed criteria for classification of new genotypes of mumps virus. Scand J Infect Dis 2002; 34:355. 2. Palacios G, Jabado O, Cisterna D, et al: Molecular identification of mumps virus genotypes from clinical samples: standardized method of analysis. J Clin Microbiol 2005; 43:1869 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 3 khorfakkan Hospital
  4. 4. Epidemiology  Mumps is endemic in most unvaccinated populations  The virus is spread from human reservoir by ; * Direct contact * Airborne droplets * Fomites contaminated by saliva * possibly by urine  It is distributed worldwide  Affects both sexes equally 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 4 khorfakkan Hospital
  5. 5. Epidemiology (cont.)  Before introduction of the vaccine in 1967: * the peak incidence of the disease occurred in children 5-9 yr of age * 85% of infections occurred in children younger than 15 yr of age.  Now most cases occur in young adults, producing outbreaks in colleges or in the workplace. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 5 khorfakkan Hospital
  6. 6. Epidemiology (cont.)  Outbreaks appear to be primarily related to a lack of immunization, especially in an underimmunized cohort of children born from 1967-1977, rather than to waning to immunity.  Epidemics occur at all seasons but are slightly more frequent in late winter and spring. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 6 khorfakkan Hospital
  7. 7. Epidemiology (cont.) In the United States, the reported incidence of mumps declined after the introduction of mumps vaccine in 1967  the recommendation for its routine use in 1977.  After expanded recommendations for a 2- dose measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine schedule for measles control in 1989, mumps cases declined further 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 7 khorfakkan Hospital
  8. 8. Reported cases of mumps infection per 100 000 population, 1978–2003. (Data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Summary of notifiable diseases, United States 2003. MMWR 2005;52: 54.) 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 8 khorfakkan Hospital
  9. 9. Number of reported cases of mumps by year – United States, 1980–2006. Data for 2005 and 2006 are provisional. MMR, measles, mumps, and rubella . 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 9 khorfakkan Hospital
  10. 10. Epidemiology (cont.)  Virus has been isolated from saliva as long as 6 days before and up to 9 days after appearance of salivary gland swelling.  Transmission does not seem to occur more than 24 hr before the appearance of the swelling or later than 3 days after it has subsided.  Virus has been isolated from urine from the 1st- 14th day after the onset of salivary gland swelling. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 10 khorfakkan Hospital
  11. 11. Pathogenesis  After entry into the last and initial multiplication in the cells of the respiratory tract, the virus is bloodborne to many tissues, among which the salivary and other glands are the most susceptible. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 11 khorfakkan Hospital
  12. 12. Clinical Manifestations  The incubation period ranges from 14-24 days, with a peak at 17-18 days.  Approximately 30-40% of infections are subclinical  In children, prodromal manifestations are rare but may be manifest by: * Fever * Muscular pain (especially in the neck) * Headache * Malaise typically precede the parotid swelling by 12 to 24 hours 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 12 khorfakkan Hospital
  13. 13. Clinical Manifestations (cont.) *Common complaints are:  Earache on the side of parotid involvement Discomfort with eating or drinking acidic food * Parotid pain is most pronounced during the first few days of swelling 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 13 khorfakkan Hospital
  14. 14. Clinical Manifestations (cont.) The swollen parotid gland lifts the earlobe upward and outward, and the angle of the mandible is obscured  the opening of the Stensen duct on the buccal mucosa is edematous and erythematous.  Trismus (spasm of the masticatory muscles) can occur. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 14 khorfakkan Hospital
  15. 15. Toddler with mumps parotitis (Courtesy of A. Margileth.) 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 15 khorfakkan Hospital
  16. 16. Clinical Manifestations (cont.)  Other salivary glands such as the submandibular and sublingual glands may also be involved. In 10-15% of patients only the submandibular gland(s) may be swollen  Presternal edema can be notable.  Morbilliform rash has been reported in association with mumps infection 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 16 khorfakkan Hospital
  17. 17. Clinical Manifestations (cont.) Systemic symptoms, including fever, usually resolve within 3 to 5 days  the parotid swelling subsides within 7 to 10 days  Adolescents and adults have more severe disease than young children. Kathleen M. Gutierrez . Mumps Virus. In : Long: Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, CHAPTER 224, 3rd ed. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 17 khorfakkan Hospital
  18. 18. Diagnosis  The diagnosis of mumps parotitis is usually apparent from the clinical symptoms and physical examination  Routine laboratory tests are nonspecific; usually leukopenia is present with relative lymphocytosis.  An elevation in serum amylase levels is common; the rise tends to parallel the parotid swelling and then to return to normal within 2 wk 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 18 khorfakkan Hospital
  19. 19. Diagnosis (cont.) The microbiologic diagnosis is by serology or virus culture Enzyme immunoassay for mumps immunoglobulin (Ig). IgG and IgM antibodies are most commonly used for diagnosis.  IgM antibodies are detectable in the first few days of illness and are considered diagnostic 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 19 khorfakkan Hospital
  20. 20. Diagnosis (cont.) Mumps virus can be cultured from the saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, blood, urine, brain, and other infected tissues.  Primary cultures of human or monkey kidney cells are used for viral isolation  The mumps skin test is unreliable for diagnosis of mumps and for determination of susceptibility to infection. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 20 khorfakkan Hospital
  21. 21. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS The differential diagnosis of parotitis is broad and includes:  bacterial (suppurative) parotitis  parotid duct stone  drug reactions  recurrent parotitis of childhood  Other viruses, such as influenza, coxsackievirus A, echovirus, and parainfluenza viruses 1 and 3, can cause parotitis and are usually responsible for “recurrent mumps”  parotid tumor  Sjögren syndrome 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 21 khorfakkan Hospital
  22. 22. Boy with parotitis not due to mumps virus. (Courtesy of J.H. Brien.) 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 22 khorfakkan Hospital
  23. 23. Treatment There is no specific antiviral therapy; treatment is entirely supportive.  Antipyretics (acetaminophen or ibuprofen) are indicated for fever. Bed rest should be guided by the patient's needs, but no evidence indicates that it prevents complications. The diet should be adjusted to the patient's ability to chew. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 23 khorfakkan Hospital
  24. 24. Treatment (cont.)  Orchitis should be treated with local support and bed rest. Mumps arthritis may respond to a 2-wk course of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent or corticosteroids. Salicylates do not appear to be effective 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 24 khorfakkan Hospital
  25. 25. Complications  MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS 1.The most frequent complication in childhood 2. Clinical manifestations occur in more than 10% of patients 3. The incidence of mumps meningoencephalitis is approximately 250/ 100,000 cases 4. The mortality rate is about 2% 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 25 khorfakkan Hospital
  26. 26. Complications  MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS (cont.) 5. may be either: I. Primary infection of neurons: parotitis frequently appears at the same time or following the onset of encephalitis II. Postinfectious encephalitis with demyelination : encephalitis follows parotitis by an average of10 days. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 26 khorfakkan Hospital
  27. 27. Complications  MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS (cont.) *Mumps meningoencephalitis is clinically indistinguishable from meningoencephalitis of other origins * Moderate stiffness of the neck is seen, but the remaining findings on neurologic examination are usually normal *The cerebrospinal fluid may show a lymphocytic pleocytosis of less than 500 cells/ mm3, although occasionally the count may exceed 2,000 cells/mm3. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 27 khorfakkan Hospital
  28. 28. Complications (cont.)  ORCHITIS AND EPIDIDYMITIS 1.These complications rarely occur in prepubescent boys but are common (14-35%) in adolescents and adults. 2. The testis is most often infected with or without epididymitis; epididymitis may also occur alone. 3. Bilateral orchitis occurs in approximately 30% of patients. Rarely, there is a hydrocele. 4.The orchitis usually follows parotitis within 8 days. Orchitis may also occur without evidence of salivary gland infection. . 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 28 khorfakkan Hospital
  29. 29. Complications  ORCHITIS AND EPIDIDYMITIS (cont.) 5.The onset is usually abrupt, with a rise in temperature, chills, headache, nausea, and lower abdominal pain; 6.The affected testis becomes tender and swollen, and the adjacent skin is edematous and red. 7.The average duration of illness is 4 days. 8. Approximately 30-40% of affected testes atrophy, leaving a cosmetic imbalance. 9. Infertility is rare even with bilateral orchitis. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 29 khorfakkan Hospital
  30. 30. Complications (cont.) OOPHORITIS Pelvic pain and tenderness are noted in about 7% of postpubertal female patients. There is no evidence of impairment of fertility. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 30 khorfakkan Hospital
  31. 31. Complications (cont.) PANCREATITIS * Mild or subclinical pancreatic involvement is common, but severe pancreatitis is rare. * It may be unassociated with salivary gland manifestations and may be misdiagnosed as gastroenteritis. * Epigastric pain and tenderness, which are suggestive, may be accompanied by fever, chills, vomiting, and prostration. * An elevated serum amylase value is characteristically present in patients with mumps, with or without clinical manifestations of pancreatitis 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 31 khorfakkan Hospital
  32. 32. Complications (cont.)  MYOCARDITIS *Serious cardiac manifestations are extremely rare * mild infection of the myocardium may be more common than is recognized. * Electrocardiographic tracings revealed changes, mostly depression of the ST segment, in 13% of adults in one series. * Such involvement may explain the precordial pain, bradycardia, and fatigue sometimes noted among adolescents and adults with mumps. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 32 khorfakkan Hospital
  33. 33. Complications (cont.) ARTHRITIS * Migratory polyarthralgia and even arthritis are occasionally seen in adults with mumps but are rare in children. * The knees, ankles, shoulders, and wrists are most commonly affected. * The symptoms last from a few days to 3 mo, with a median duration of 2 wk 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 33 khorfakkan Hospital
  34. 34. Complications (cont.) THYROIDITIS * It is uncommon in children * A diffuse, tender swelling of the thyroid may occur about 1 wk after the onset of parotitis * Antithyroid antibodies subsequently develop 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 34 khorfakkan Hospital
  35. 35. Complications (cont.) DEAFNESS * Unilateral, rarely bilateral, nerve deafness may occur * the incidence is low (1/15,000 cases) * mumps was historically a leading cause of unilateral nerve deafness. * The hearing loss may be transient or permanent. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 35 khorfakkan Hospital
  36. 36. Complications (cont.) OCULAR COMPLICATIONS * Dacryoadenitis may occur with painful swelling, usually bilateral, of the lacrimal glands. * Optic neuritis (papillitis) may occur * Symptoms vary from loss of vision to mild blurring, with recovery in 10-20 days. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 36 khorfakkan Hospital
  37. 37. Prognosis The prognosis of mumps in childhood is excellent.  Infection usually confers permanent immunity  Reinfections have been documented 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 37 khorfakkan Hospital
  38. 38. Prevention  Mumps vaccine is derived from the Jeryl Lynn strain of mumps virus,  The vaccine induces antibody in 96% of seronegative recipients and has 97% protective efficacy.  The initial mumps immunization, usually as measles- mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, is recommended at 12- 15 mo of age.  A second immunization, also as MMR, is recommended routinely at 4-6 yr of age but may be administered at any time during childhood provided at least 4 wk have elapsed since the first dose. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 38 khorfakkan Hospital
  39. 39. Prevention (cont.)  Women should avoid becoming pregnant for 30 days after monovalent mumps vaccination (3 mo if vaccination was performed with rubella vaccine).  Other contraindications to vaccination include: * allergy to a vaccine component (anaphylaxis to neomycin) * moderate or severe acute illnesses with or without fever * immunodeficiency (primary immunodeficiencies, cancer and cancer therapy, long-term high-dose corticosteroid therapy, severely immunocompromised, including those with HIV infection) * recent immune globulin administration 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 39 khorfakkan Hospital
  40. 40. Prevention (cont.) Children who have not previously received the second dose should be immunized by 11-12 yr of age.  Rarely, parotitis and low-grade fever can develop 10-14 days after vaccination. Vaccinees do not shed virus.  Maternal antibody is protective in the infant in the first 6 mo of life. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 40 khorfakkan Hospital
  41. 41. Key Changes in 2006 Recommendations for Mumps Vaccine  ACCEPTABLE PRESUMPTIVE EVIDENCE OF IMMUNITY Documentation of adequate vaccination is now 2 doses of a live mumps virus vaccine instead of 1 dose for: school-aged children (i.e., grades K–12). adults at high risk (i.e., persons who work in healthcare facilities, international travelers, and students at posthigh-school educational facilities) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Control and Elimination of Mumps. MMWR 2006;55:1–2. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 41 khorfakkan Hospital
  42. 42. Key Changes in 2006 Recommendations for Mumps Vaccine (Cont.) ROUTINE VACCINATION FOR HEALTHCARE WORKERS Persons born during or after 1957 without other evidence of immunity; 2 doses of a live mumps virus vaccine Persons born before 1957 without other evidence of immunity: consider recommending 1 dose of a live mumps virus vaccine) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Control and Elimination of Mumps. MMWR 2006;55:1–2. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 42 khorfakkan Hospital
  43. 43. Key Changes in 2006 Recommendations for Mumps Vaccine FOR OUTBREAK SETTINGS Children aged 1–4 years and adults at low risk; if affected by the outbreak, consider a second dose of live mumps virus vaccine Healthcare workers born before 1957 without other evidence of immunity: strongly consider recommending 2 doses of live mumps virus vaccine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Control and Elimination of Mumps. MMWR 2006;55:1–2. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 43 khorfakkan Hospital
  44. 44. Summary  Mumps is an acute viral infection involves swelling of one or both parotid glands  Mumps is an RNA virus of the genus Rubulavirus in the Paramyxoviridae family  spread from human reservoir by ; direct contact. airborne droplets. fomites contaminated by saliva and possibly by urine  Transmission does not seem to occur more than 24 hr before the appearance of the swelling or later than 3 days after it has subsided  The incubation period ranges from 14-24 days, with a peak at 17-18 days.  Approximately 30-40% of infections are subclinical  Common complaints are: earache ,discomfort with eating or drinking acidic food parotid pain is most pronounced during the first few days of swelling 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 44 khorfakkan Hospital
  45. 45. Summary  the opening of the Stensen duct on the buccal mucosa is edematous and erythematous.  submandibular and sublingual glands may also be involved.  the parotid swelling subsides within 7 to 10 days  The diagnosis of mumps parotitis is usually apparent from the clinical symptoms and physical examination  There is no specific antiviral therapy; treatment is entirely supportive.  Complications include: MENINGOENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ORCHITIS AND EPIDIDYMITIS, OOPHORITIS , PANCREATITIS , MYOCARDITIS, ARTHRITIS , THYROIDITIS, DEAFNESS and OCULAR COMPLICATIONS  The prognosis of mumps in childhood is excellent.  Infection usually confers permanent immunity  Prevention by usage of live attenuated vaccine which induces antibody in 96% of seronegative recipients and has 97% protective efficacy. 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 45 khorfakkan Hospital
  46. 46. References  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Control and Elimination of Mumps. Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep MMWR 2006; 55:366-368.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : Update: multistate outbreak of mumps - United States, January 1-May 2, 2006. Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep MMWR 2006; 55:559-563  American Academy of Pediatrics Mumps. In: Pickering LK, Baker CJ, Long SS, ed. 2006 Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 27th ed.. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2006:464.  In: Wharton M, Hughes H, Reilly M, ed. Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine- Preventable Diseases, 3rd ed.. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2002  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : Summary of notifiable diseases, United States, 2003. MMWR 2005; 52:1 8/30/2010 Mumps Prof. Saad S Al Ani 46 khorfakkan Hospital

×