Dr.Alan Bruce. ULS, Ireland
Katerina Riviou, EllinogermanikiAgogi,Greece
LINQ/EFQUEL:Crete, 8 May 2014
 Future of European educational systems rests on
skills, knowledge and attitudes of teachers
 Move from largely curricul...
 Students learn more effectively in
technologically enhanced environments
 Technology is a tool not simply a solution
 ...
 Education informed by critical and reflective
perspectives
 Competence building upon standards
 Role of quality – conc...
 Technological resources and access
 Engaging families and communities
 Moving from teacher to student focus
 Relation...
 End of permanent jobs for life
 Casualization and degraded conditions
 Part-time and fragmented work
 Developing care...
 Decreasing workers’ share in national income
in all countries
 Labor productivity (up 85% since 1980) not
reflected in ...
 Patterns of constant change
 Permanent migration mobility
 Outsourcing
 Flexible structures and modalities
 Obsolesc...
 Innovation supporting learning
 Innovation supporting work
 Re-evaluation of traditional methods and structures
 Chan...
 Persistence and increase in inequality
 Permanent hopelessness of excluded
 Embedded violence
 Internal underclass
 ...
 Commodification of knowledge
 Impact on education systems (Freire, Illich,
Field)
 Impact on work (Braverman, Haraszti...
 Conservative
 Strict
 Hierarchic
 Inflexible
 Memorization and recall focus
 Examination-driven
 Resistant to appl...
 Pupil/learner centered
 Competence driven
 Community focused
 Technologically enhanced
 International engagement foc...
 Disruptive classroom behaviors
 Absenteeism
 Early school-leaving
 Teacher burnout
 Migration, integration and susta...
“Competence means the proven ability to use
knowledge, skills and personal, social and/or
methodological abilities, in wor...
 They are multifunctional
 They are transversal across all fields
 They refer to a higher order of mental complexity,
i...
 Meaningful contexts
 Multidisciplinary approach
 Constructive learning
 Cooperative, interactive learning
 Discovery...
The Competency Framework for Teachers
articulates the complex nature of teaching by
describing three professional elements...
The European Reference Framework of Key
Competences was defined in the
Recommendation on key competences for
lifelong lear...
• Communication in the mother tongue
• Communication in foreign languages
• Mathematical competence and basic
competences ...
 Digital competence
 Learning to learn
 Social and civic competences
 Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship
 Cultu...
 To help teachers acquire and reinforce such skills and knowledge so
that they can design cross-curricular activities tha...
TRANSIt
 Schooling and education at a crossroads: both
structure and process
 Labor market and education increasingly
connected
...
Dr. Alan Bruce
abruce@ulsystems.com
Katerina Riviou
kriviou@ea.gr
TRANSIt Project
www.transit-project.eu
Shaping Competence: Quality on transformative learning for schools
Shaping Competence: Quality on transformative learning for schools
Shaping Competence: Quality on transformative learning for schools
Shaping Competence: Quality on transformative learning for schools
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Shaping Competence: Quality on transformative learning for schools

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Paper delivered at LINQ/EFQUEL Conference in Rethymnon, Crete on 8 May 2014

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Shaping Competence: Quality on transformative learning for schools

  1. 1. Dr.Alan Bruce. ULS, Ireland Katerina Riviou, EllinogermanikiAgogi,Greece LINQ/EFQUEL:Crete, 8 May 2014
  2. 2.  Future of European educational systems rests on skills, knowledge and attitudes of teachers  Move from largely curriculum centered process to competence is not easy  Standards, outcomes and measures drive curricula  Do these alone meet labor market needs or needs in a transformed socio-political universe?
  3. 3.  Students learn more effectively in technologically enhanced environments  Technology is a tool not simply a solution  Technology supports quality – it informs and is informed by best practice  Move towards designing courses as interdisciplinary explorations  Learners learn within a community
  4. 4.  Education informed by critical and reflective perspectives  Competence building upon standards  Role of quality – conceptual issues  Alternative to curriculum driven systems  Move from time based system to learning based system  All age groups included
  5. 5.  Technological resources and access  Engaging families and communities  Moving from teacher to student focus  Relationship to labor market  Designing for difference: inclusion and UDL  The role of adult education and lifelong learning  Addressing the impact of change
  6. 6.  End of permanent jobs for life  Casualization and degraded conditions  Part-time and fragmented work  Developing careers not jobs  Adaptability  Flexibility  High entry level requirements  Market focus  Ethics and social responsibility  Customer service quality and planning
  7. 7.  Decreasing workers’ share in national income in all countries  Labor productivity (up 85% since 1980) not reflected in wages (up 35%)  Declining social mobility  Rising income inequality reflected in declining equality of opportunity  Urbanization and rural decline  Mass unemployment and crisis
  8. 8.  Patterns of constant change  Permanent migration mobility  Outsourcing  Flexible structures and modalities  Obsolescence of job norms  Knowledge economy  Ecological pressures  End of certainty
  9. 9.  Innovation supporting learning  Innovation supporting work  Re-evaluation of traditional methods and structures  Changing needs  Analyzing and responding to impact of globalization  Change without changing – innovation with precedents  Facing new realities – using evidence
  10. 10.  Persistence and increase in inequality  Permanent hopelessness of excluded  Embedded violence  Internal underclass  Social polarization  Stripping away rights  Invisibility, ethnic difference and the retreat to denial
  11. 11.  Commodification of knowledge  Impact on education systems (Freire, Illich, Field)  Impact on work (Braverman, Haraszti, Davis)  Impact on community - alienation and anomie  From community to networking  Knowledge and learning now centrally linked as product and process dimensions
  12. 12.  Conservative  Strict  Hierarchic  Inflexible  Memorization and recall focus  Examination-driven  Resistant to application of new technologies
  13. 13.  Pupil/learner centered  Competence driven  Community focused  Technologically enhanced  International engagement focus  Learning process (application modes)  Individual value (humanistic approach)
  14. 14.  Disruptive classroom behaviors  Absenteeism  Early school-leaving  Teacher burnout  Migration, integration and sustainability  Literacy, numeracy, basic skills  Languages  Quality and governance DG EAC (2008) European Education andTraining Systems in the Second Decennium of the Lisbon Strategy, NESSE and ENEE.
  15. 15. “Competence means the proven ability to use knowledge, skills and personal, social and/or methodological abilities, in work or study situations and in professional and personal development.” European Commission, 2008
  16. 16.  They are multifunctional  They are transversal across all fields  They refer to a higher order of mental complexity, including active, reflective and responsible approaches to life  They are multidimensional, incorporating know- how, analytical, critical, creative and communication skills – as well as common sense
  17. 17.  Meaningful contexts  Multidisciplinary approach  Constructive learning  Cooperative, interactive learning  Discovery learning  Reflective learning  Personal learning
  18. 18. The Competency Framework for Teachers articulates the complex nature of teaching by describing three professional elements of teachers’ work:  Skills  Knowledge  Attitudes/values These elements work in an interrelated way as they are put into practice in classrooms.
  19. 19. The European Reference Framework of Key Competences was defined in the Recommendation on key competences for lifelong learning adopted by the Council and the European Parliament in December 2006 as a result of five years of work by experts and government representation collaborating within the Open Method of Coordination.
  20. 20. • Communication in the mother tongue • Communication in foreign languages • Mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology • Digital competence • Learning to learn • Social and civic competences • Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship • Cultural awareness and expression
  21. 21.  Digital competence  Learning to learn  Social and civic competences  Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship  Cultural awareness and expression. The five competences mentioned here are transversal. They are cross curricular and pervasive. They also support acquisition of all key competencies
  22. 22.  To help teachers acquire and reinforce such skills and knowledge so that they can design cross-curricular activities that support the key competencies acquisition (KCA) of their students.  To support teachers in the process of assessing competences with the use of e-portfolios.  To raise the awareness of the administrative staff of schools in order to support teachers in bridging the gap between policy and practice (e.g. curricular reforms in order to support cross-curricular competence driven activities).  Also aimed at teachers’ collaboration with colleagues, in order ultimately to become innovation leaders in their institutions.
  23. 23. TRANSIt
  24. 24.  Schooling and education at a crossroads: both structure and process  Labor market and education increasingly connected  Planetary focus is on mobility, skills and innovation  Huge impact of increasing inequality of access and of resources  Crisis as the norm  Addressing assessment  Performance, standards, quality, reproducibility and added value at the heart of competence
  25. 25. Dr. Alan Bruce abruce@ulsystems.com Katerina Riviou kriviou@ea.gr TRANSIt Project www.transit-project.eu

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