Wtl firework safety - issue 1 - october 2013

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FIREWORK SAFETY - A great reminder for us all to think about our plans and ensure we all enjoy the celebrations without anybody getting hurt....

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Wtl firework safety - issue 1 - october 2013

  1. 1. WTL / KYFS Issue 1 October 31st 2013 Page 1 of 4 Wilton Transport Limited - KEEP YOUR FAMILY SAFE. 1. Did You Know? It is against the law to carry fireworks in public if you're under 18. Fireworks must not be sold to anyone who is under 18. It is an offence to let fireworks off during night hours (11pm to 7am), except on Bonfire Night (midnight), Diwali, New Year, and Chinese New Year (1am). It is an offence under the Explosives Act 1875 to tamper with or modify fireworks. Having fireworks at home can be great fun, as long as they are used safely. Figures show more children rather than adults get hurt by fireworks. Over the past five years over 350 pre-school children, some only a year old, were treated in hospital for fireworks injuries. Be safe not sorry. Fireworks are safe if you use them properly. If you’re putting on a home display, you should follow some simple steps to make sure that everyone has a good time without getting hurt. Keep kids safe. We want children to enjoy fireworks but they need to know that they can be dangerous if they are not used properly. Each year, over half of all firework injuries are suffered by children. Sparkler safety. Did you know that sparklers get five times hotter than cooking oil? Sparklers are not toys and should never be given to a child under five. Where to buy. Don’t cut corners just to save a few quid. Always buy fireworks from a reputable shop to make sure that they conform to British Standards. This means that they should have BS 7114 written on the box. Sometimes shops open up for a short time before Bonfire Night but these may not be the best places to buy fireworks from. Staff in these shops might not be very knowledgeable about using fireworks safely and their fireworks might not meet British Standards. Whatever you do, don’t buy fireworks from anywhere you’re not sure about, such as the back of a van or from a temporary, unlicensed market stall. Terry Bye - Compliance & Systems Consultant - Wilton Transport Limited Transport Headquarters - Wilton International - Middlesbrough - TS10 4RG Tel: 01642 212143 Fax: 01642 212144 Email: terry.bye@wiltontransport.co.uk
  2. 2. WTL / KYFS Issue 1 October 31st 2013 Page 2 of 4 Wilton Transport Limited - KEEP YOUR FAMILY SAFE. What to buy. There are different categories of fireworks. Members of the public can buy and set off most of the fireworks that come under Categories 1 to 3. These are fireworks that include those that you can use indoors, in your garden or at a display. Always read the packet carefully and make sure that the fireworks you buy are suitable for the place where you are going to set them off. Professional fireworks. Some fireworks can only be bought and used by firework professionals. These include: air bombs; aerial shells, aerial maroons, shells-in-mortar and maroons-in-mortar; all bangers; mini rockets; fireworks with erratic flight; some Category 2 and 3 fireworks which exceed certain size limits; and all Category 4 fireworks. Setting them off. Only one person should be in charge of fireworks. If that’s you, then make sure you take all the necessary precautions. Read the instructions in daylight and don’t drink any alcohol until they’ve all been discharged. Make your preparations in advance, and in daylight. On the night, you will need... A torch. A bucket or two of water. Eye protection and gloves. A bucket of soft earth to put fireworks in. Suitable supports and launchers if you’re setting off catherine wheels or rockets. Think of your neighbours… Let your neighbours know if you are planning a fireworks party, they may have pets which should be kept indoors. In rural areas this could include larger animals such as horses and donkeys in stables nearby . In addition it would be kind to let elderly neighbours and families with young children know there may be some loud bangs. Remember…fireworks can be fun, but have consideration for others! 2. Firework displays. If you are organising a firework display for the general public, read the information on how to organise safe and successful firework displays. Setting Up a Display What to do... Before designing your display, you should have appointed a firing team who will light the fireworks. This should be no more than 3 people with 1 person in overall charge of the team. The firing team should have previous experience of lighting fireworks and should have a good knowledge of safety issues. For an exciting and colourful event, plan your display well. Work out a firing script - decide which firework will be let off at which time and in what order. Start with noisy effects and cycles of fireworks at ground level, then low level, then effects high in the sky, back to ground level again, ending with a real flourish. Start with set pieces at the front, move onto novelty candles and batteries to high level rockets and shells. By pre-sorting, you can have different effects, colours and noises Follow the instructions on the labels carefully. Set up the display in daylight and practice the firing schedule at least once beforehand. Make sure you have a torch so you can read the instructions in the dark during the display. Terry Bye - Compliance & Systems Consultant - Wilton Transport Limited Transport Headquarters - Wilton International - Middlesbrough - TS10 4RG Tel: 01642 212143 Fax: 01642 212144 Email: terry.bye@wiltontransport.co.uk
  3. 3. WTL / KYFS Issue 1 October 31st 2013 Page 3 of 4 Wilton Transport Limited - KEEP YOUR FAMILY SAFE. Ensure you have enough timber for static pieces, as some may need to be nailed to stakes. These should be set up in advance of the event and assembled carefully to avoid damaging the firework or fuse. Only use launcher tubes for rockets - never use milk bottles, buckets or stake them in the ground. Do not use matches or a lighter to light the fuses. Do not allow anyone to smoke when handling fireworks or in the firing area when the display is set up. When setting up, follow the instructions as to how far away fireworks should be placed from each other. Do not use mortar tubes for more firings than specified in the instructions. Put the last firework in place about 30 minutes before the display and ensure the area is well guarded to avoid accidental lighting or sabotage. Cover them with plastic bags to avoid wet from rain and dew. After your display. Keep the public away from the safety, display and fallout area until after the site is cleared Wait until after the display is finished before collecting spent, dud or misfired fireworks. If cold, fully spent fireworks can be put into the bin. If a firework fails to go off, leave it for at least 30 minutes before lifting. It can then be made safe by immersing it in water. Wear gloves, goggles and hold at arm’s length when lifting Do not remove misfired mines from mortar tubes. Fill the tubes with water overnight and remove them the next day. Come back the next day during daylight to completely clear the site. 3. Animal Welfare. Did You Know? It is an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to any domestic or captive animals Animals have very acute hearing. Loud bangs and whistles may cause them actual pain in their ears. Protect Your Animals. Although fireworks are fun for us, they are not fun for animals. Most animals get very scared by the lights and noise, so you should take precautions to protect your pets during the times of the year when fireworks are likely to be set off. The animal charity Blue Cross says that the best thing you can do is to keep your pets indoors. This includes bringing in pets that are normally kept outside, such as rabbits or guinea pigs. Close all of your windows and doors and try to drown out the noise as much as possible. And make sure that cats and dogs have name tags on them in case the noise scares them and they run off. The ‘Blue Cross’ has a leaflet with more detailed advice on keeping your pets safe from fireworks. Penalties. Under section 1 of the Protection of Animals Act 1911 it is an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to any domestic or captive animals. The penalty on conviction is a fine of up to £5,000 or up to six months imprisonment, or both. Enforcement of this section of the Act rests with Trading Standards, the Police or the RSPCA as appropriate. Terry Bye - Compliance & Systems Consultant - Wilton Transport Limited Transport Headquarters - Wilton International - Middlesbrough - TS10 4RG Tel: 01642 212143 Fax: 01642 212144 Email: terry.bye@wiltontransport.co.uk
  4. 4. WTL / KYFS Issue 1 October 31st 2013 Page 4 of 4 Wilton Transport Limited - KEEP YOUR FAMILY SAFE. Firework curfew. Changes to the law mean that fireworks can't be set off between 11pm and 7am (apart from on November 5th, New Year's Eve, Chinese New Year and Diwali, when the curfew is later). Hopefully, this curfew will keep to a minimum the times when animals and people are disturbed by fireworks. 3. Disposal of Fireworks. Recommendations for disposal*. Never put fireworks, even those which are fully spent, on the bonfire. Never dispose of them by burying. Put fully spent fireworks (but not misfired or partly spent fireworks) in refuse receptacles. Soak misfired or partly spent fireworks in a container of water in an area where they cannot be tampered with (preferably away from the display site) and contact the manufacturer or supplier for advice on disposal. *Taken from: Giving your own firework display : How to run and fire it safely. HSE. ISBN 0 7176 6162 8 (Available from HSE Books). T.Bye October 31st 2013. Terry Bye - Compliance & Systems Consultant - Wilton Transport Limited Transport Headquarters - Wilton International - Middlesbrough - TS10 4RG Tel: 01642 212143 Fax: 01642 212144 Email: terry.bye@wiltontransport.co.uk

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