America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs          Student Research Team:      Vivek Wadhwa, Executive in Residence Ramakrishn...
Table of ContentsIntroduction and Overview ..................................................................................
Introduction and OverviewTwo of the most important questions now being debated in the U.S. are the effects ofglobalization...
The results show that the trend Saxenian documented for Silicon Valley, a pattern ofskilled immigrants leading innovation ...
•   Immigrant non-citizens filed more theoretical, computational and practical patents       than mechanical, structural o...
Background on U.S. ImmigrationMarch 2003 U.S. Census data show that 11.7% of the U.S. population was foreign-born.1Immigra...
Figure 2: Foreign-Born Population for Individual States: 2000According to the Census bureau, a higher proportion of the fo...
Methodology – Immigrant Key Founder DataData AcquisitionTo quantify the economic contributions of immigrant entrepreneurs ...
Definition of Key FounderIn most engineering or technology companies, the key founders are the President/ChiefExecutive Of...
Methodology – WIPO Patent RecordsData AcquisitionTo gauge the intellectual property contributions of immigrants, we first ...
Data Analysis – Immigrant Key Founder DataWe obtained responses from 2,054 engineering and technology companies founded in...
Chart 1: Birthplace of Engineering and Technology Immigrant Founders                           30%                        ...
Table 2: U.S. States Where Immigrants are Founding Engineering and TechnologyCompanies                                    ...
Using this same state breakdown of immigrant founder data, it is possible to determinethe states where immigrant entrepren...
Chart 4c: Where are Immigrants from China Founding Engineering andTechnology Companies?                                   ...
Graph 5a underscores the dominance of Asian immigrant-founders of engineering andtechnology companies in California, parti...
Graph 5c shows that Massachusetts is home to large numbers of Israeli- (17%), German-(10%), and British- (10%) immigrant f...
Graph 5e: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inNew York                                       ...
Industry Specific Immigrant Founder DataOur definition of “engineering and technology companies” extends to companiespract...
industries than in other engineering and technology fields. A graphic representation ofthese data can be found in Chart 7....
Chart 8b: Industries in which Immigrants from the U.K. are Founding Companies                                             ...
These data show that all four immigrant groups founded innovation/manufacturing-related service companies in similar propo...
Chart 9b: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Biosciences Field                                                Taiwan        ...
Chart 9e: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Software Field                                                                 ...
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
Entrepreneurs immigrants in US
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Entrepreneurs immigrants in US

  1. 1. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Student Research Team: Vivek Wadhwa, Executive in Residence Ramakrishnan Balasubramanian, Pratt School of Engineering, Master of Engineering Management Program Pradeep Kamsali, Nishanth Duke University Lingamneni, Chris Morecroft,Niyanthi Reddy, George Robinson, AnnaLee Saxenian, Dean and Professor Batul Tambawalla, Mark Weaver, School of Information Zhenyu Yang University of California, Berkeley Special Thanks: Neopatents, Gloria Gyamfi, Ben Rissing, Research Scholar and Project Manager Laura Higbie, Amanda McCain, Pratt School of Engineering, Master of Engineering Management Program Marine Raoux, Anand Sankar, Duke University Chuntat Tan, Payman Tayebi, Rachel Wu, Tarun Wadhwa, Gary Gereffi, Director and Professor John P. Harvey, Duke University Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness, Sociology Department Statistical Consulting Center Duke University January 4, 2007 Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=990152
  2. 2. Table of ContentsIntroduction and Overview .............................................................................................................. 3Background on U.S. Immigration..................................................................................................... 6Methodology – Immigrant Key Founder Data ................................................................................. 8 Data Acquisition ......................................................................................................................... 8 Definition of Key Founder.......................................................................................................... 9 Definition of an Immigrant and Immigrant-Founded Company................................................. 9 Data Collection ........................................................................................................................... 9 Quality Assurance and Data Analysis......................................................................................... 9Methodology – WIPO Patent Records........................................................................................... 10 Data Acquisition ....................................................................................................................... 10 Limitations/Definition of Immigrant Non-citizen .................................................................... 10Data Analysis – Immigrant Key Founder Data............................................................................... 11 Revenue and Employment Data................................................................................................ 11 Immigrant-Founder Origin Data ............................................................................................... 11 State Wise Distribution of Immigrant Founder Data................................................................ 12 Industry Specific Immigrant Founder Data .............................................................................. 19Data Analysis – WIPO Patent Records .......................................................................................... 25 WIPO PCT Applications by U.S. Immigrant Nationality......................................................... 25 WIPO PCT Application Trend Analysis of Immigrant Non-Citizen Filings ........................... 26 WIPO PCT Application Analysis by International Patent Classification Codes...................... 27Special Analysis – Silicon Valley, CA .............................................................................................. 31Special Analysis – Research Triangle Park, NC............................................................................... 33Summary of Results and Conclusion .............................................................................................. 35Author Biographies ........................................................................................................................ 36Appendix A: High Technology Industry Definition ....................................................................... 37Appendix B: WIPO Search Strings................................................................................................. 39Bibliography................................................................................................................................... 41 America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 2 Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=990152
  3. 3. Introduction and OverviewTwo of the most important questions now being debated in the U.S. are the effects ofglobalization and immigration on the nation’s economy. Globalization is accelerating andit is still not clear whether trends like outsourcing will erode U.S. competitiveness orprovide long-term benefits. The focus of the immigration debate is on the plight ofmillions of unskilled immigrants who have entered the U.S. illegally. Overlooked in thedebate are the hundreds of thousands of skilled immigrants who annually enter thecountry legally.In 1999 AnnaLee Saxenian published a groundbreaking report on the economiccontributions of skilled immigrants to California’s economy. This study, entitled“Silicon Valley’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs”, focused on the development of SiliconValley’s regional economy and the roles of immigrant capital and labor in this process.Saxenian’s study also went beyond a quantitative analysis to focus on the social, ethnicand economic networks of new U.S. immigrants. One of her most interesting findingswas that Chinese and Indian engineers ran a growing share of Silicon Valley companiesstarted during the 1980s and 1990s and they were at the helm of 24% of the technologybusinesses started from 1980 to 1998. Saxenian concluded that foreign-born scientistsand engineers were generating new jobs and wealth for the California economy. Eventhose who returned to their home countries to take advantage of opportunities there werebuilding links to the U.S. and spurring technological innovation and economic expansionfor California.A team of student researchers in the Master of Engineering Management program of thePratt School of Engineering at Duke University has been researching the impact ofglobalization on the U.S. economy and the engineering profession. The team is led byExecutive in Residence Vivek Wadhwa, Research Scholar Ben Rissing, and SociologyProfessor Gary Gereffi. Earlier research focused on the education and graduation rates ofengineers in the U.S., China and India, and an analysis of the experiences of U.S. firmsengaged in outsourcing their engineering operations.The Duke researchers were concerned about the growing momentum in outsourcing andits impact on U.S. competitiveness—and sought to understand the sources of the U.S.global advantage as well as what the U.S. can do to keep its edge. To better understandthe contributions of skilled immigrants to the competitiveness of the U.S. economy, theydecided to expand and update Saxenian’s study.The goal of this research was to document the economic and intellectual contributions ofimmigrant technologists and engineers at the national level. To understand the economicimpact, the study looked at a large sample of all engineering and technology companiesfounded in the last ten years, to determine whether a key founder was an immigrant. Tounderstand the intellectual contribution, they analyzed the World Intellectual PropertyOrganization Patent Cooperation Treaty database for international patent applicationsfiled in the United States. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 3 Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=990152
  4. 4. The results show that the trend Saxenian documented for Silicon Valley, a pattern ofskilled immigrants leading innovation and creating jobs and wealth, has become anationwide phenomenon. Here are some characteristics of the engineering andtechnology companies started in the U.S. from 1995 to 2005. • In 25.3% of these companies, at least one key founder was foreign-born. States with an above-average rate of immigrant-founded companies include California (39%), New Jersey (38%), Georgia (30%), and Massachusetts (29%). Below- average states include Washington (11%), Ohio (14%), North Carolina (14%), and Texas (18%). • Nationwide, these immigrant-founded companies produced $52 billion in sales and employed 450,000 workers in 2005. • Indians have founded more engineering and technology companies in the US in the past decade than immigrants from the U.K., China, Taiwan and Japan combined. Of all immigrant-founded companies, 26% have Indian founders. • Chinese (Mainland- and Taiwan-born) entrepreneurs are heavily concentrated in California, with 49% of Mainland Chinese and 81% of Taiwanese companies located there. Indian and U.K. entrepreneurs tend to be dispersed around the country, with Indians having sizable concentrations in California and New Jersey and the British in California and Georgia. • The mix of immigrants varies by state. Hispanics constitute the dominant group in Florida, with immigrants from Cuba, Columbia, Brazil, Venezuela, and Guatemala founding 35% of the immigrant-founded companies. Israelis constitute the largest founding group in Massachusetts, with 17%. Indians dominate New Jersey, with 47% of all immigrant-founded startups. • Almost 80% of immigrant-founded companies in the US were within just two industry fields: software and innovation/manufacturing-related services. • Immigrants were least likely to start companies in the defense/aerospace and environmental industries. They were most highly represented as founders in the semiconductor, computer, communications, and software fields.We estimate, based on an analysis of the World Intellectual Property Organization(WIPO) patent databases, that foreign nationals residing in the U.S. were named asinventors or co-inventors in 24.2% of international patent applications filed from the U.S.in 2006. Unlike the company founder survey, this count does not include suchimmigrants who became citizens before filing a patent. We therefore classified theforeign nationals as “immigrant non-citizens”. WIPO PCT applications represent a subsetof those filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office but are likely to have a highglobal utility and contribute to U.S. competitiveness. • The trend has been dramatic; according to our estimates the contribution of non- citizen immigrants to these international patent applications increased from 7.3% in 1998 to 24.2% in 2006. • The largest group of immigrant non-citizen inventors were Chinese (Mainland- and Taiwan-born). Indians were second, followed by the Canadians and British. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 4
  5. 5. • Immigrant non-citizens filed more theoretical, computational and practical patents than mechanical, structural or traditional engineering patents.To understand the role of regional technology centers in fueling the growth ofengineering and technology companies, we did a special analysis of Silicon Valley, CAand Research Triangle Park, NC. Here are the findings of our analysis of engineering andtechnology companies founded from 1995 to 2005 in these regions: • Over half (52.4%) of Silicon Valley startups had one or more immigrants as a key founder, compared with the California average of 38.8%. • A comparison with Saxenian’s 1999 findings shows that the percentage of firms with Indian or Chinese founders had increased from 24% to 28%. Indian immigrants outpaced their Chinese counterparts as founders of engineering and technology companies in Silicon Valley. Saxenian reported that 17% of Silicon Valley startups from 1980-1998 had a Chinese founder and 7% had an Indian founder. We found that from 1995 to 2005, Indians were key founders of 15.5% of all Silicon Valley startups, and immigrants from China and Taiwan were key founders in 12.8%. • In Research Triangle Park, 18.7% of startups had an immigrant as a key founder, compared with the North Carolina average of 13.9%. Indians constitute the largest immigrant founding group, with 25% of startups, followed by immigrants from Germany and the U.K., each with 15%.What is clear is that immigrants have become a significant driving force in the creation ofnew businesses and intellectual property in the U.S. — and that their contributions haveincreased over the past decade. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 5
  6. 6. Background on U.S. ImmigrationMarch 2003 U.S. Census data show that 11.7% of the U.S. population was foreign-born.1Immigrants from Latin America make up the largest portion of this group at 53.3%,followed by Asia (25.0%) and Europe (13.7%). Figure 1 displays the countries of birthfor foreign born individuals living in the U.S. in 1990 and 2000.Figure 1: Countries of Birth of the U.S. Foreign-Born Population in 1990 and 2000(Includes Data from Groups with 500,000 or More Individuals Living in the U.S. in2000)2It is noteworthy that immigrants from China and India both constitute much less than 1%of the total U.S. population.Immigrant populations vary considerably by state. California has the highest percentage,with 24.9% of the states 2000 population being foreign-born, followed by New York,with 19.6%; Florida, with 18.4%; and Nevada, with 15.2%. The lowest foreign-born statepopulations are in west/midwest and southern states. A full state breakdown of thisCensus data can be found in Figure 2.1 Larsen, Luke (August 2004). The Foreign-Born Population in the United States: 2003. P20-551.Retrieved from the World Wide Web: <http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/p20-551.pdf>2 U.S. Census Bureau (December 2001). Profile of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States: 2000.Retrieved from the World Wide Web: <http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/p23-206.pdf> America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 6
  7. 7. Figure 2: Foreign-Born Population for Individual States: 2000According to the Census bureau, a higher proportion of the foreign-born Asianpopulation than the total foreign-born population came to the United States over the pasttwo decades. The majority of the foreign-born Asian population had entered the UnitedStates since 1980. See Figure 3 for this breakdown.Figure 3: Foreign-Born Asians by Year of Entry to the U.S. in 200033 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). “Figure 6: Nativity and Citizenship Status: 2000”, Census 2000 specialtabulation. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 7
  8. 8. Methodology – Immigrant Key Founder DataData AcquisitionTo quantify the economic contributions of immigrant entrepreneurs to the U.S. economywe sought to identify the direct involvement of immigrants in the founding ofengineering and technology companies. We obtained a list of all such companiesfounded in the U.S. in the last ten years (1995-2005) from Dun & Bradstreet’s (D&B)Million Dollar Database. This contains U.S. companies with more than $1 million insales, and 20 or more employees, and company branches with 50 or more employees.This database is commonly used by researchers and is considered a source of reliabledata.This D&B database search produced a listing of 28,766 companies. A very small portionof these were older companies with recent changes in control or corporaterestructurings/mergers, so these were omitted from our dataset. Included below is a listof key data that D&B provides: • Company name • Total number of employees • Type of company • Select executive officer • City, state, zip code information • Phone number • Primary standard industrial • Company website classification • SalesFor the purposes of our study, the words technology and engineering indicate that themain work of the company is to use technology or engineering to design or manufactureproducts or services. Our definition of engineering and technology firms thus includesthe following industry groups, defined with 3- and 4-digit U.S. Government StandardIndustrial Classification (SIC) codes: semiconductors, computers/communications,biosciences, defense/aerospace, environmental, software, and innovation/manufacturing-related services. A full listing of the SIC codes associated with each industry group ispresent in appendix A. These are the same engineering and technology SIC codes used inSaxenian’s original research. We excluded some professional services SIC codes whichwere included in Saxenian’s 1999 study, but were outside the purview of the engineeringand technology disciplines.Company entries within each SIC code were randomized using a Microsoft Excel randomnumber assignment. Researchers were then assigned random listings of 500 companies,with representative entries from each of the main engineering and technology industrygroups.Our research team then made thousands of unsolicited phone calls to these companies.We asked whether one or more immigrant key founders had established the company andif so, what their nationality was. This became the source of the data presented in thisreport. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 8
  9. 9. Definition of Key FounderIn most engineering or technology companies, the key founders are the President/ChiefExecutive Officer or the head of development/Chief Technology Officer. An individualcan simultaneously perform both of these roles. Other roles such as finance, marketing,HR, and legal can be very important in startups. For the purposes of our research,however, we chose to use a narrow definition of key founder and exclude the latter roles.Definition of an Immigrant and Immigrant-Founded CompanyAn immigrant is a person who was born as a citizen of another country and subsequentlymoved to the United States at some point in his or her lifetime. Immigrant-foundedcompanies are those having one or more immigrants as key founders.Data CollectionA team of fifteen graduate students and research assistants telephoned CEOs, HRmanagers and other knowledgeable company employees. After a two-sentenceintroduction of the student researcher, Duke University and the research project, theywere asked: (1) Were any of your company’s key founders immigrants to the United States? If “Yes” they were asked: (2) In what country was he or she born?They followed the first question with the definition of “key founder” and “immigrantfounded company”.Quality Assurance and Data AnalysisAfter all of the data had been collected, we performed quality assurance on our records.Two criteria in particular were chosen ensure the veracity of the collected data. First,companies listed in the D&B database with zero employees at their US headquarters wereomitted from consideration. Second, companies with 2005 sales greater than 100 milliondollars were double checked to make certain that they had been founded after 1995. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 9
  10. 10. Methodology – WIPO Patent RecordsData AcquisitionTo gauge the intellectual property contributions of immigrants, we first attempted toanalyze the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) database. Unfortunatelythe USPTO does not record citizenship data an application for a patent.With the assistance of Neopatents — a Raleigh, North Carolina based patent research andanalytics firm — we determined that we could obtain information on inventor nationalityby examining a different database: Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) applicationspublished by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). WIPO is based inGeneva, Switzerland, and coordinates the filing of international patents. These are thepatents that likely have high global utility. Neopatents provided our research team accessto its proprietary Spore® Search software package to query the WIPO patent database.Limitations/Definition of Immigrant Non-citizenThe WIPO database records information on inventors nationalities and the countries inwhich they resided at the time of filing a PCT application. The drawback of thiscomparison is that it imposes a conservative definition of “immigrant” on our patentanalysis. The only patent data available are for foreign nationals who currently reside inthe United States. We classified these as “immigrant non-citizens” to differentiate fromthe criteria we used for immigrant company founders.To put this in perspective, according to the 2000 U.S. Census, from 1990 to 2000, 12.5million foreign-born citizens were granted U.S. citizenship.i Any U.S. naturalizedcitizens who have filed a PCT application after becoming a citizen are not counted. As aresult, our findings represent a conservative estimate of the contributions of immigrants.Additionally, we limited our search to patents awarded from 1998 to 2006. Although thePCT databases include records since 1978, we found that prior to 1998 the databasecontains far fewer records.For our research, we examined all PCT application records that had been filed throughthe U.S. PCT Receiving Office. We extracted all records for published patents thatcontain one or more applicants of non-U.S. nationality who were residing in the U.S. atthe time of filing the application. Patents meeting these criteria and published between1998 and 2006 (inclusive) were identified. During this period, WIPO publishedapproximately 340,000 PCT applications filed by U.S.-resident applicants through theU.S. receiving office.An explanation of our WIPO search strings using Spore® Search can be found inAppendix B of this report. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 10
  11. 11. Data Analysis – Immigrant Key Founder DataWe obtained responses from 2,054 engineering and technology companies founded in theU.S. from 1995 to 2005. Of these companies, 25.3% reported that at least one of their keyfounders was an immigrant. Extrapolating from this sample, we estimate that allcompanies founded by immigrants from 1995 to 2005 produced $52 billion dollars insales and employed 450,000 workers in 2005. A breakdown of our survey statistics andresponse rates can be found in Table 1 below:Table 1: Founder Survey Statistics and Response Rates Count VariableTotal "Yes" Responses: 520 aTotal "No" Responses: 1534 b"Decline to Comment/Participate" Responses: Too Busy, Unwilling to Provide 407 cInformation, No Data/Knowledge"Missing Data": Bad Phone Numbers, Disconnected Calls, Hang Ups, Requests 2128 dfor Call Backs and Answering MachinesTotal Companies Approached: 4589 eResponse Rate R1 (The proportion of survey responses obtained out of total 44.8%survey delivery attempts) [(a+b)/e]Response Rate R2 (The proportion of survey responses obtained out of total 83.5%surveys actually delivered) [(a+b)/(a+b+c)]Revenue and Employment DataTo infer information on all of the 28,776 companies founded in the last ten years, weemployed a sampling distribution of a proportion, and performed a finite populationcorrection. Using this method, we can say with 95% confidence that 25.3% ± 1.8% ofthe 28,776 engineering and technology companies founded from 1995 to 2005 had animmigrant key founder. This equates to 7,283 ± 518 companies. These 7,283 companiesproduced more than $52 billion dollars in 2005 sales and in 2005 had just under 450,000employees.Immigrant-Founder Origin DataThe immigrant founders of U.S. engineering and technology companies come from allover the world. Our data identified immigrant founders from more than 60 differentcountries. The top 10 are listed in Chart 1. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 11
  12. 12. Chart 1: Birthplace of Engineering and Technology Immigrant Founders 30% 25% Percentage of Founders 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% y na an a a a n K l n e an ad di pa re Ira U ra w hi In Ko m an Ja Is i C Ta er C G Country of OriginChart 1 shows Indian immigrants have founded more engineering and technologycompanies from 1995 to 2005 than immigrants from the U.K., China, Taiwan and Japancombined.State-Wise Distribution of Immigrant Founder DataWe analyzed the responses based on the location of each company’s headquarters aslisted in the D&B database. This allowed us to group responses by state and determinewhether immigrant engineering and technology founders had a propensity to gravitatetowards certain U.S. states when starting new companies. We were only able to reportresults from 19 states where we had a high enough sampling density to be confident ofour findings. Table 2 indicates the percentage of companies founded by immigrants ineach of these states. The study’s average immigrant founding rate is also presented toillustrate the extent of a state’s deviation from the national average. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 12
  13. 13. Table 2: U.S. States Where Immigrants are Founding Engineering and TechnologyCompanies 45.0% 40.0% Percentage of Immigrant Key Founders 35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% a e a ts ut ey n o d ia rk a ia n a a ia s s o in ag ni to an ad oi on ga xa an id hi et rn ic rg in Yo rs ol va in ng or O ct us er rg yl Te or if o hi iz eo di Je ar Ill Fl yl ne ew ar Ar Av ic hi Vi In ol ch al G C ns ew M as M C on C N sa th y en W ud N C as or P St N M StateIt is not surprising to see California leading this group, with 38.8% of its companieshaving been established by immigrant key founders. High percentages for New Jersey(37.6%) and Michigan (32.8%) were interesting findings, as was the relatively lowperformance of Washington state (11.3%) and North Carolina (13.9%).Chart 3 details where immigrant founded engineering and technology companies werelocated. Once again, California dominates, with 34% of all U.S.-immigrant-foundedcompanies. The next ranked state is New Jersey, with only 7.3%.Chart 3: Breakdown of Engineering and Technology Companies Founded byImmigrants from 1995 to 2005 by State Others 19.6% California 34.0% Virginia 4.8% Texas 4.6% New York 5.2% Colorado 2.1% New Jersey 7.3% Florida 6.7% Michigan 3.7% Georgia 3.3% Massachusetts 5.2% Illinois 3.5% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 13
  14. 14. Using this same state breakdown of immigrant founder data, it is possible to determinethe states where immigrant entrepreneurs from specific ethnic groups are concentrated.Charts 4a – 4d detail these statistics for the four largest immigrant groups: those fromIndia, the U.K., China, and Taiwan.Chart 4a: Where are Immigrants from India Founding Engineering andTechnology Companies? Other Arizona W isconsin 7% 3% 2% Virginia 7% California 26% Texas 5% Pennsylvania 3% Ohio 1% New York 3% Florida 5% New Jersey Georgia 14% 4% Maryland Illinois New Hampshire Michigan 4% 4% 2% 7% Massachusetts 2%Chart 4b: Where are Immigrants from the U.K. Founding Engineering andTechnology Companies? Virginia Washington Texas 3% 3% Arizona 5% 5% Tennessee 3% California Rhode Island 13% 3% Pennsylvania 3% Ohio Colorado 5% 5% North Carolina 3% Connecticut 5% New York 5% Florida New Jersey 5% 3% Missouri 3% Georgia Massachusetts 13% 8% Illinois Louisiana 5% 3% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 14
  15. 15. Chart 4c: Where are Immigrants from China Founding Engineering andTechnology Companies? Texas 10% New York 6% New Mexico 6% New Jersey California 6% 49% Massachusetts 6% Maryland 3% Illinois Indiana 3% 3% Florida Georgia 3% 5%Chart 4d: Where are Immigrants from Taiwan Founding Engineering andTechnology Companies? W ashington Pennsylvania Texas 3% 3% 3% New York 3% Maryland 3% Georgia 4% California 81%These data reveal a high level of ethnic clustering by immigrant-founded engineering andtechnology companies. 40% of Indian founders favored locations in California and NewJersey. Founders from the U.K. displayed the greatest dispersion, showing no centralizedfounding locations, with the exception of slightly higher rates in California and Georgia.Chinese (both Mainland- and Taiwan-born) founders were heavily concentrated inCalifornia, with 49% of those from China and 81% of those from Taiwan establishingcompanies in this state. This clustering reflects the self-reinforcing nature of immigrantsocial and technical networks in the state, which are probably also factors that continue todraw Indian immigrant-founders disproportionately to California and New Jersey.Grouping the data by state reveals both the distinct spatial clustering of immigrant-founders and the diversity of immigrant-founders in the same states. Graphs 5a – 5gdisplay the immigrant groups founding engineering and technology companies in thestates with our highest response profiles: California, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey,New York and Texas. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 15
  16. 16. Graph 5a underscores the dominance of Asian immigrant-founders of engineering andtechnology companies in California, particularly those from India (20%), Taiwan (13%),and China (10%) The profile of immigrant founders in Florida is quite different, andlargely appears to reflect geographic proximity. Graph 5b shows the dominance of Southand Central American immigrant founders in Florida, with Cuba (10%), Venezuela (8%),and Colombia (8%) along with India (18%.)Graph 5a: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inCalifornia Anonymous 4% Australia Vietnam Other 2% 2% 8% Canada China UK 3% 10% 3% Egypt 1% Taiwan France 13% 2% Germany 4% Switzerland 1% Poland 2% Philippines 3% Peru India 1% 20% Netherlands 1% Mexico Korea 1% 6% Israel Iran Malaysia 2% 6% 1% Japan 6%Graph 5b: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inFlorida Venezuela China 8% Brazil 3% 3% Columbia UK Turkey 8% 5% 3% Spain 5% Cuba 10% Romania 3% Portugal France 3% 3% Nicaragua Germany 3% 5% Netherlands Guatemala 3% 3% Mexico Hungary 8% 3% Malaysia India 3% Israel 18% Lebanon 3% 3% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 16
  17. 17. Graph 5c shows that Massachusetts is home to large numbers of Israeli- (17%), German-(10%), and British- (10%) immigrant founders. Graph 5d reveals the dominance ofIndian-immigrant founders (47%) in New Jersey.Graph 5c: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inMassachusetts Anonymous UK 6% 10% Canada South Africa 4% 4% Russia China 4% 7% Romania Dominican Republic 4% 4% Norway 4% Korea Germany 4% 10% Japan 4% Italy 4% India 10% Israel Ireland 17% 4%Graph 5d: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inNew Jersey Turkey 3% Anonymous 3% Philippines UK Portugal China 3% 3% 3% 4% France New Zealand 4% Malaysia 3% 3% Greece 3% Korea 7% Japan 4% Israel 7% Ireland 3% India 47%Japanese, Indian, and Israeli founders are equally well-represented in New York, wherethey each account for 14% of the immigrant-founded engineering and technologycompanies (Graph 5e) Immigrant-founders from India (25%) and China (14%) dominatein Texas (Graph 5f). America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 17
  18. 18. Graph 5e: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inNew York Anonymous 3% UK Armenia Australia Taiwan 7% 3% 3% 3% Canada 3% Russia 7% China Netherlands 7% 3% Czech Republic 3% Egypt Japan 3% 14% France 3% Germany 3% Italy 3% India Israel 14% 14%Graph 5f: Immigrant Groups Founding Engineering and Technology Companies inTexas Anonymous 4% Trinidad Austria UK 4% 4% 7% Taiwan Canada 4% 4% South Africa 4% China Pakistan 14% 4% New Zealand 4% Finland Mexico 4% 7% France 4% Japan 4% Italy 4% Israel India 4% 25%In conclusion, Indian immigrant-founders were well represented in California, Floridaand Texas, and they accounted for almost half the immigrant founders in New Jersey, yetthey represented only 10% of the immigrant founders in Massachusetts. Immigrantfounders from Latin American countries such as Mexico, Columbia, Venezuela and Cubawere better represented in Florida. Israeli founders were concentrated in New York andMassachusetts. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 18
  19. 19. Industry Specific Immigrant Founder DataOur definition of “engineering and technology companies” extends to companiespracticing in the fields of bioscience, computers/communications, defense/aerospace,environmental, innovation/manufacturing-related services, semiconductors, and softwareas defined by a company’s primary SIC code (see Appendix A for a more in depthdescription of the included SIC codes). This section explores the concentrations ofimmigrant entrepreneurs in particular engineering and technology industries. From 1995to 2005 almost 80% of immigrant-founded companies were within just two businessfields: innovation/manufacturing-related services (46%) and software (33%). A fullbreakdown of immigrant founding activity across all seven business fields appears inChart 6.Chart 6: Breakdown of Engineering and Technology Companies Founded byImmigrants from 1995 to 2005 by Industry Computers / Bioscience Communications 6% 8% Defense / Aerospace 1% Software Environmental 33% 2% Semiconductors 4% Innovation / Manufacturing-Related Services 46%The low immigrant participation in the founding of defense/aerospace companies is likelydue to the present restrictive environment for government contracts, which often limitswork to individuals with U.S. citizenships and security clearances. The software fieldcontains computer programming services, prepackaged software, integrated systemdesign, processing services and information retrieval companies. Theinnovation/manufacturing-related services field includes a variety of electronics,computer and hardware design and service companies in addition to engineering services,research and testing.Immigrant entrepreneurs are not evenly represented across these seven technology fields.Of all the companies we surveyed, 25.3% had one or more immigrant founder; but thisaverage varied by up to 18 percentage points between engineering- and technology-industry classifications. Immigrant founders were more heavily concentrated in thesemiconductor (35.1%), computer/communications (31.7%), and software (27.9%) America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 19
  20. 20. industries than in other engineering and technology fields. A graphic representation ofthese data can be found in Chart 7.Chart 7: Industry Breakdown of Immigrant Founded Companies Defense / Aerospace 7.9% Environmental 9.2% Bioscience 20.1% Industry Field All Industry Fields 25.3% Innovation / Manufacturing- 25.9% Related Services Software 27.9% Computers / 31.7% Communications Semiconductors 35.2% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 40.0% Percentage of Immigrant Key FoundersBy cross-referencing our industry-field and immigrant-founder–nationality data, we candetermine the propensity of specific immigrant ethnic groups to found new companies indistinct industry fields. Tables 8a to 8d display the industries in which immigrants fromIndia, the U.K., China, and Taiwan have founded companies from 1995 to 2005.Chart 8a: Industries in which Immigrants from India are Founding Companies Computers / Communications 5% Defense / Aerospace Bioscience 0% 2% Environmental 1% Software 46% Innovation / Manufacturing-Related Services 44% Semiconductors 2% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 20
  21. 21. Chart 8b: Industries in which Immigrants from the U.K. are Founding Companies Computers / Bioscience Communications 5% 8% Defense / Aerospace 0% Environmental 0% Software 43% Innovation / Manufacturing-Related Services Semiconductors 44% 0%Chart 8c: Industries in which Immigrants from China are Founding Companies Bioscience Software 0% Computers / 19% Communications 25% Semiconductors 8% Defense / Aerospace 0% Environmental 6% Innovation / Manufacturing-Related Services 42%Chart 8d: Industry Fields in which Immigrants from Taiwan are FoundingCompanies Bioscience Software 3% 17% Computers / Communications 27% Semiconductors 7% Defense / Aerospace 0% Environmental 0% Innovation / Manufacturing-Related Services 46% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 21
  22. 22. These data show that all four immigrant groups founded innovation/manufacturing-related service companies in similar proportions over the past decade (accounting for42% to 46% of all engineering and technology companies founded by each group).Entrepreneurs from India and the U.K. gravitated as well toward the software industry,which accounted for 46% and 43%, respectively, of their startups; but they wereminimally represented in hardware-oriented sectors such as semiconductors andcomputers/communications.Immigrant founders from China and Taiwan started companies in a broader range ofindustries, and were more likely to start computers/communications (with 25% and 27%respectively) and software companies (19% and 17%). In addition, they were more likelyto be founders of semiconductor companies (8% and 7%) than their Indian or U.K.counterparts.In a final analysis of this industry-specific data, we present a breakdown of the immigrantgroups founding companies in distinct industry fields. Due to the relatively lowimmigrant activity in defense/aerospace and environmental industry fields, data on thesegroups will not be presented. Breakdowns of the remaining five industry groups can befound in Charts 9a to 9e.Chart 9a: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Innovation/Manufacturing-RelatedServices Field Immigrants Founded Companies in the Innovation/Manufacturing-Related Field in the Last Ten Years Austria Anonymous Australia 1% 4% 2% Vietnam Armenia Brazil 2% Other 1% 1% Venezuela 7% 1% Canada 4% UK 6% China Columbia 6% 2% Turkey 1% Cuba 1% Taiwan Spain 6% France 1% 2% South Korea Germany 2% South Africa 4% 1% Greece Russia 1% 2% Poland 1% Peru India 1% Japan 24% 7% Pakistan 1% Iran Mexico Malaysia Korea Italy Israel 1% 1% 3% 1% 2% 2% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 22
  23. 23. Chart 9b: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Biosciences Field Taiwan UK Anonymous 3% 6% 10% Switzerland Cambodia 3% 3% Portugal Romania Canada 3% 3% 3% Philippines Egypt 3% 3% New Zeland France 3% 6% Netherlands 3% Germany Korea 10% 10% Japan India 3% Israel 10% Ireland Iran 6% 3% 3%Chart 9c: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Computers/Communications Field Anonymous 4% Brazil UK 2% Turkey 6% Taiwan 2% Chile 17% 2% China 19% Switzerland 2% Finland Singapore 2% 2% Germany Portugal 2% 2% Hungary Panama 2% 2% India 15% Malaysia Japan 2% Korea 2% 6% Iran Italy Ireland 4% 2% 2%Chart 9d: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Semiconductors Field Anonymous Taiwan 5% 10% Canada Switzerland 5% 5% Poland China 5% 15% Philippines 10% Germany 5% Peru 5% Mexico India 5% 15% Japan 5% Israel Iran 5% 5% America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 23
  24. 24. Chart 9e: Immigrant-Founder Origins in the Software Field Anonymous Canada 2% 3% Other Australia 3% China 9% 4% Taiwan 3% UK France 9% 2% Russia 1% Germany Romania 5% 1% Poland 1% Philippines 2% Netherlands 3% Korea 2% India Japan 34% 3% Iran Italy 4% 2% Israel 6%Indian immigrants are the primary founders of immigrant companies in theinnovation/manufacturing-related services fields. Just under a quarter of the immigrantswho founded companies in this field are from India, followed at a considerable distanceby Taiwan and China at 6% each. The Indian immigrant group contributes as well to thebiosciences and computers/communications fields but is not a dominant force. Inbiosciences, India and Germany each contribute 10% of the companies founded byimmigrants; the U.K., France, Israel and Korea trail at 6%.In the computers/communications field, India-, Taiwan-, and China-born founderstogether accounted for just over 50% of all the immigrant start-ups from 1995 to 2005.India- and China-born immigrant entrepreneurs each founded 15% of the immigrant-founded semiconductors companies from 1995 to 2005. These contributions were trailedby those of immigrant founders from the Philippines (10%) and Taiwan (10%). Finally,within the software field, Indian immigrants established 34% of the immigrant foundedsoftware companies from 1995 to 2005. America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs Master of Engineering Management Program, Duke University; School of Information, U.C. Berkeley 24

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