Drawing & Painting with Style and Confidence Presented by Anne Kullaf Anne Kullaf © 2008 Painting en Plein Air
Workshop premise… <ul><li>This workshop is designed to provide a basic primer for students new to painting en plein air (o...
Workshop Overview… <ul><li>During the workshop we will explore the following topics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Methods & Mater...
Painting en plein air <ul><li>Painting plein air is a great way to practice seeing shapes, values & colors </li></ul><ul><...
Methods and Materials <ul><li>Basic items: </li></ul><ul><li>Easel – either a French easel or aluminum field easel, or a p...
Methods and Materials <ul><li>Oil Alla Prima </li></ul><ul><li>Wet-into-wet </li></ul><ul><li>Done in one pass as opposed ...
Methods and Materials <ul><li>Pastels </li></ul><ul><li>Very expressive medium </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for a great deal o...
Methods and Materials <ul><li>Acrylic </li></ul><ul><li>Quick drying time </li></ul><ul><li>Water can be used as a medium,...
Methods and Materials <ul><li>Watercolor </li></ul><ul><li>Highly expressive but unforgiving </li></ul><ul><li>Colors not ...
Color
Color Basics <ul><li>Colors that complement one another should be used to create shadows and darks, in other words, colors...
Color in the Landscape <ul><li>Working with colors in changing light can be challenging </li></ul><ul><li>The most importa...
The Limited Palette <ul><li>Try working with a limited palette of 3 primaries, one dark neutral and one white. One of my f...
The Limited Palette <ul><li>2 Paintings,  </li></ul><ul><li>1 Palette: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cobalt Blue </li></ul></ul><u...
Green! <ul><li>Green is one of the most challenging colors to work with </li></ul><ul><li>Variety of greens is key </li></...
Composition
Composition Basics <ul><li>Composition refers to the way you arrange the elements/objects contained in your painting in or...
Composition in the Field <ul><li>Composing in the field can be a challenge because of the feeling of no boundaries </li></...
Tying it all together…
Tying it all together… <ul><li>Here are some things you can do when painting en plein air: </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on shap...
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Plein Air

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Plein Air

  1. 1. Drawing & Painting with Style and Confidence Presented by Anne Kullaf Anne Kullaf © 2008 Painting en Plein Air
  2. 2. Workshop premise… <ul><li>This workshop is designed to provide a basic primer for students new to painting en plein air (outdoors in natural light). It will address the challenges specific to working outdoors as well as with specific mediums (oil, acrylic, pastel, watercolor). </li></ul>
  3. 3. Workshop Overview… <ul><li>During the workshop we will explore the following topics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Methods & Materials: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Overview of materials needed for painting en plein air </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Challenges of each medium/suitability to the task </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Color: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Working with colors in the landscape </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Working with a limited palette </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The challenges of the color green </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Composition: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Composing in the field </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Painting en plein air <ul><li>Painting plein air is a great way to practice seeing shapes, values & colors </li></ul><ul><li>Plein air studies can be used to create future studio paintings </li></ul><ul><li>Working outdoors is challenging and good practice for capturing changing light quickly </li></ul>Tree, plein air study in oil on canvas Anne Kullaf © 2008
  5. 5. Methods and Materials <ul><li>Basic items: </li></ul><ul><li>Easel – either a French easel or aluminum field easel, or a pochade box depending on your medium of choice </li></ul><ul><li>Covered containers for holding water or mediums suitable for oil or acrylic </li></ul><ul><li>Palette, preferably one that is NOT white (glare can be a problem) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Methods and Materials <ul><li>Oil Alla Prima </li></ul><ul><li>Wet-into-wet </li></ul><ul><li>Done in one pass as opposed to layering </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent technique for plein air </li></ul><ul><li>Loose brushwork, very expressive </li></ul><ul><li>Best for smaller works (11x14 and under) </li></ul>
  7. 7. Methods and Materials <ul><li>Pastels </li></ul><ul><li>Very expressive medium </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for a great deal of spontaneity </li></ul><ul><li>Work from dark to light </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent for sketching </li></ul><ul><li>Optically mix colors on the surface to create new colors (can be challenging to those not used to working with color) </li></ul>Magnolia Tree, plein air study in pastel Anne Kullaf © 2008
  8. 8. Methods and Materials <ul><li>Acrylic </li></ul><ul><li>Quick drying time </li></ul><ul><li>Water can be used as a medium, or gel for slower drying </li></ul><ul><li>Highly versatile: can be layered similarly oil color on canvas, or transparently like watercolor on paper </li></ul>
  9. 9. Methods and Materials <ul><li>Watercolor </li></ul><ul><li>Highly expressive but unforgiving </li></ul><ul><li>Colors not as strong/bold as oil </li></ul><ul><li>Highly suitable for plein air </li></ul><ul><li>Working from light to dark may be confusing for those of us used to pastel or oil </li></ul>Flowers, study in watercolorl on paper Anne Kullaf © 2007
  10. 10. Color
  11. 11. Color Basics <ul><li>Colors that complement one another should be used to create shadows and darks, in other words, colors that appear opposite one another on the color wheel </li></ul><ul><li>Example: if you need show a shaded area on a lemon (yellow, primary color) use violet (secondary color) </li></ul><ul><li>Mix your secondary colors whenever possible instead of using them directly from the tube </li></ul>
  12. 12. Color in the Landscape <ul><li>Working with colors in changing light can be challenging </li></ul><ul><li>The most important step in plein air painting is the value study—get the values right and the painting will have strength and dimension </li></ul><ul><li>If the values are not dark enough, the painting will look washed out </li></ul><ul><li>It is also important to keep variety in colors, particularly in the shadows—use mixtures to create your darks, avoid black </li></ul>
  13. 13. The Limited Palette <ul><li>Try working with a limited palette of 3 primaries, one dark neutral and one white. One of my favorites is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cobalt blue - Burnt umber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alizarin crimson - Titanium white </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Yellow ochre </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You may experiment with other colors you like, just remember to keep it to 3 primaries and one dark neutral plus white. </li></ul><ul><li>If necessary, you can always add in a brighter primary for the areas in highlight—for example, I often will use a cadmium yellow in addition to the colors above when working on sunlit landscapes just to get that extra “glow” in my greens. </li></ul>
  14. 14. The Limited Palette <ul><li>2 Paintings, </li></ul><ul><li>1 Palette: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cobalt Blue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alizarin Crimsom </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Yellow Ochre </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cadmium Yellow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Burnt Umber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Titanium White </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Notice the difference in mood of the 2 paintings above. </li></ul><ul><li>Both were painted using the colors listed at left, this illustrates the wide range of effects capable with a limited palette. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Green! <ul><li>Green is one of the most challenging colors to work with </li></ul><ul><li>Variety of greens is key </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid using greens out of the tube—mix whenever possible </li></ul><ul><li>Some good combos: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cobalt & cadmium yellow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cobalt & yellow ochre </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add a little titanium white to either of the above to “grey” them down or lighten if necessary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add in some alizarin in shadow areas or some violet </li></ul></ul>Tree, plein aire study in oil on canvas Anne Kullaf © 2008
  16. 16. Composition
  17. 17. Composition Basics <ul><li>Composition refers to the way you arrange the elements/objects contained in your painting in order to create and maintain: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Harmony </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Viewer interest </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Composition in the Field <ul><li>Composing in the field can be a challenge because of the feeling of no boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>An old mat in a size format that you like can be used as a view finder to help you decide what to include </li></ul><ul><li>You can also use your digital camera screen or view finder in the same manner </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t rely on these tools all the time though, try to compose purely “by eye” in order to build your skill in this area </li></ul>
  19. 19. Tying it all together…
  20. 20. Tying it all together… <ul><li>Here are some things you can do when painting en plein air: </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on shapes and values – sketch in charcoal first! </li></ul><ul><li>Use complementary colors for shading </li></ul><ul><li>Try working with a limited palette </li></ul><ul><li>Try working with a new medium </li></ul><ul><li>Vary your greens in the landscape, mix colors as opposed to using straight from the tube </li></ul><ul><li>Try to find something you LIKE about every sketch you do and remember what it is so you can build upon it </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the areas you want to improve and practice those specific skills so that you become more confident </li></ul>

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