Dennis & Defleur Ch. 5

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  • Like other forms of print media, magazines are in a printed format and have subscribers. However, like most other media, convergence has melded magazines in with all other types of media with an online presence. Despite similarities in the online world, magazines are distinct. Magazines meet three of the criteria set forth by Harold Lasswell – they help us survey the environment, correlate what’s happening in society to the environment and transmit social heritage.
  • the development of magazines in America lagged behind the debut of magazines in England and other part of Europe. The major reasons included that the majority of population in the colonies was in rural areas, the high costs of (1) having a printing press and (2) a very weak local market to support subscriptions and advertising, a underdeveloped road and transportation system and the fact that a magazine in the 1700s would cost about $315 in today’s money
  • This question is designed to lead students to think about the importance of logistics and technology when thinking about the adoption of media organizations.
  • After the debut of television, advertisers and readers began to turn to television to satisfy entertainment and information needs. This caused magazines such as Life and Collier’s to shut down in the 1950s and 1960s. Magazines had to shift from trying to target general audiences to a industry interested in packaging niche audiences.
  • Publishers look for new and emerging markets to launch magazines aimed at particular target audiences. Using aggressive marketing and promotional techniques, new magazines see growth in advertising revenues and provide new types of content. Once competitors enter into the same market niche, advertising revenues and circulation rates stabilize and no longer experience growth. Reader interest, social changes and economic consequences see magazines go through a steeper decline in ad revenues and circulation numbers. Finally, faltering magazines exit the market – literally or are re-designed and/or re-named.
  • Dennis & Defleur Ch. 5

    1. 1. This multi-media product and its content are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: Any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; Any preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; Any rental, lease or lending of the program Understanding Media in the Digital Age, 1/e Everette E. Dennis Melvin L. DeFleur Prepared by Todd Chambers, Ph.D. Texas Tech University Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    2. 2. MAGAZINES: VOICES FOR MANY INTERESTS Chapter 5 Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Distinguishing Magazines from Other Media  Published less frequently than newspapers  Different format  Has a cover  Television “magazine” shows  Website differences? Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. The History of Magazines The First Magazines  London, 1704  The Review  4 pages  Founded by Daniel Defoe, author of Robinson Crusoe  First issue written in prison  1731  Gentlemen’s Magazine  Edward Cave  15,000 subscribers! Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. American Magazines in the 1700s  Benjamin Franklin, 1741, The General Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for All the British  Plantations in America  6 issues  Lagged behind European counterparts  Nature and dispersion of the population  Economics of magazine publishing  State of transportation and postal system  Costs of subscriptions Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. American Magazines of the 1800s  400% increase between 1810 and 1860  By 1900, population increased from 23.2 million to 75.9 million Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. American Magazines of the 1800s  Urbanization  Transportation Systems  Increasing Education  Great Societal Issues Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. Question to think about  Why is a transportation system important to the adoption of a mass medium? Are there any similarities to the transportation system of the Internet? Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. American Magazines in the 1800s  Growth in Numbers and Circulation  A Magazine for Every Taste Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. American Magazines in the 1800s Number of Magazine Titles Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. Magazines in the 20th Century  1920s to 1950s  Newsmagazines  1923, Time  Digests  Picture Magazines  Large, national circulations  Life  Collier’s  Saturday Evening Post Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    12. 12. Magazines in the 20th Century  The Effect of Television  Television magazines  Advertising revenue shifting  Death of “general interest” publications: Life, Look, Collier’s  Shift to target audiences Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. Magazine Industry Today  Types of Magazines  20,000 titles  Consumer magazines  Trade journals  Sponsored publications  Farm publications Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    14. 14. Types of Magazines  Newsmagazines  national newspapers  Time, Newsweek   City Magazines  Public affairs for city/region  New York, The Washingtonian   Adult Interest Magazines  Fiction and non-fiction with provocative photos  Playboy, Playgirl Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    15. 15. Types of Magazines  Gay and Lesbian Magazines  Style publications targeted to gays and lesbians  The Advocate, Out   Sports Magazines  Readers interested in sports  Sports Illustrated   Opinion Magazines  Political commentary, older publications  The Nation, The Progressive Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    16. 16. Types of Magazines  Intellectual Magazines  “influencing the influencers;” small circulation  Commentary, American Scholar   Quality Magazines  Similar to opinion and intellectual magazines; wider circulation  Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s  Business Magazines  Business news coverage  Business Week, The Economist Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    17. 17. Types of Magazines  Men’s Interest Magazines  Content targeted for male audience related to variety of topics  Men’s Health, GQ   Women’s Interest Magazines  Content targeted for female audience related to variety of topics  Ladies’ Home Journal, O, The Oprah Magazine   Humor Magazines  MAD magazine, National Lampoon Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    18. 18. The Life Cycle of Magazines  Launch  Growth  Maturity  Decline  Death Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved. From Birth to Death
    19. 19. Magazine Publishing  Content Creation  Editing  Production  Printing and binding  Advertising, sales and marketing  Distribution Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    20. 20. The Magazine Staff - Editorial  Editor  Managing editor  Associate editor  Senior editors  Writers  Editorial assistants  Art Director  Webmaster Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    21. 21. The Magazine Staff - Business  Publisher  Advertising Manager  Associate Advertising Manager  Advertising Sales Person  Circulation Manager  Production Manager Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    22. 22. Magazines: Making a Profit  2007: $35 billion  Circulation: $10 billion  Advertising: $25 billion  Advertising  The old: circulation figures and pass-along rates  The new metrics: usage patterns, transactions, site performance Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    23. 23. The Future of Magazines  Involves the Internet  “e-zines”  New business models  www.newslink.org Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
    24. 24. Magazines in the Digital Era  Social Media  Portability: the Kindle Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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