Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI):
 Issues and research in motorcycle
ergonomics and rider human factors

               ...
Setting the scene at Nottingham
                Psychology




                  Motorcycle
                 Ergonomics
  ...
One size does NOT fit all!
Riders getting bigger – bikes getting smaller!
•   Rider anthropometry – ‘larger’ and taller
    •   25-54 years = 4.1kg (...
The type of bike dictates who rides it!
•   Fitting the person to the task or fitting the task to the
    person
    •    ...
Seeing your elbows – the impact on safety
•    Typical complaints
     •   wrist ache
     •   neck ache
     •   can’t se...
Motorcycling as an interactive system

                                       Rider
                 Control inputs       ...
How hard can it be?
•   Cognitive issues
    •   workload – traffic conditions, filtering, junctions
    •   situation awa...
The future of motorcycling
•   Advanced systems
    •   helmet mounted displays (augmented reality?)
    •   3D audio
    ...
Rear view helmet systems




•   Rider issues
    •   Do riders need forward and rear vision all the time?
    •   What ab...
The ‘Long Way Up!’
N




W




        E




    S
The ‘Long Way Up!’ challenge
•   Lands End to John O’Groats
•   3 highest mountains in England, Scotland & Wales
•   Furth...
Our sponsors
N




W




        E




    S
NASA-TLX workload ratings



90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
 0
     1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14...
Body part discomfort ratings
3-way comparison
Motorcycle simulator
Keeping it real or faking it?
Leading the way in motorcycle ergonomics
•    Motorcycle simulator
     •   interactive bike and projection screen
     • ...
Triumph Daytona
MotorcycleSim
MotorcycleSim
Thank You!



     Dr Alex W Stedmon

alex.stedmon@nottingham.ac.uk
Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Research issues in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors by  Alex Stedmon
Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Research issues in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors by  Alex Stedmon
Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Research issues in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors by  Alex Stedmon
Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Research issues in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors by  Alex Stedmon
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Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Research issues in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors by Alex Stedmon

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The motorcycle and rider can be understood in terms of an interactive system operating within a very demanding safety critical environment. Understanding this system interaction is what underpins motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors.

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Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Research issues in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors by Alex Stedmon

  1. 1. Human-Motorcycle Interaction (HMI): Issues and research in motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors Dr Alex W Stedmon alex.stedmon@nottingham.ac.uk Centre for Motorcycle Ergonomics & Rider Human Factors Dept of Mechanical, Materials, Manufacturing Engineering (M3) University of Nottingham
  2. 2. Setting the scene at Nottingham Psychology Motorcycle Ergonomics & Rider Human Factors Product Engineering Design
  3. 3. One size does NOT fit all!
  4. 4. Riders getting bigger – bikes getting smaller! • Rider anthropometry – ‘larger’ and taller • 25-54 years = 4.1kg (Dept of Health, 1993) • motorcyclists tend to be 25mm taller than average • kit manufacturers report on the size increases too • Motorbikes product design – smaller, taller and lighter • slimmed down by 20mm • ride height increased 55mm since the 80s (styling) • 1993-2003 bikes have lost around 10-15kg • Sportsbikes are alienating large riders by being lighter and small riders by being larger
  5. 5. The type of bike dictates who rides it! • Fitting the person to the task or fitting the task to the person • why are we still fitting the rider to the bike? • bad ergonomics! • Rider perception is important • Do they feel too small/big for their bike? • “I looked like an elephant on a bicycle” • Larger riders – tourers, giant trailies • Medium riders – tourers, sports tourers, all trailies, street bikes • Smaller riders – sports bikes, street bikes small trailies
  6. 6. Seeing your elbows – the impact on safety • Typical complaints • wrist ache • neck ache • can’t see in mirrors • can’t see the road ahead! • Comfortable riding position depends on • type of riding being done • style of motorbike • shape of the rider • Is adjustability the way forward? • manufacturers just catching onto the idea! • otherwise it’s after-market kit
  7. 7. Motorcycling as an interactive system Rider Control inputs Rider perception handlebars hearing footrests feeling seat body brakes Rider Motorcycle sight Sensory Sensory gears Interactive System smell feedback feedback Motion forces Wind & road on road and air headlight bodywork surface reactions brakelights indicators Environment Bike tyres • McInally (2003)
  8. 8. How hard can it be? • Cognitive issues • workload – traffic conditions, filtering, junctions • situation awareness – traffic lights, junctions • conspicuousness & vigilance – if the bike stops we come off • rider fatigue – mental & physical effort • risk taking behaviour – when/why do riders take chances? • Environmental issues • road surface – we’re always looking at it • we don’t have sun visors! • weather – tyre warm-up, tyre contact • temperature – physical and cognitive issues
  9. 9. The future of motorcycling • Advanced systems • helmet mounted displays (augmented reality?) • 3D audio • speech input • integration of rider aids • satnav systems • rider information/communication systems • entertainment systems • geo-spatial information for riders • location based services • couriers, paramedics, police
  10. 10. Rear view helmet systems • Rider issues • Do riders need forward and rear vision all the time? • What about blind-spots • Are we increasing workload and affecting situation awareness with this extra information?
  11. 11. The ‘Long Way Up!’
  12. 12. N W E S
  13. 13. The ‘Long Way Up!’ challenge • Lands End to John O’Groats • 3 highest mountains in England, Scotland & Wales • Furthest points NESW on the UK mainland • Lowest altitude and centre point of UK • 2,800 miles in 6 riding days • 466 miles/day (min = 10 miles, max = 650 miles) • £6,100 raised for charity • CancerResearchUK & The Acorns Children’s Hospice Trust
  14. 14. Our sponsors
  15. 15. N W E S
  16. 16. NASA-TLX workload ratings 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
  17. 17. Body part discomfort ratings
  18. 18. 3-way comparison
  19. 19. Motorcycle simulator
  20. 20. Keeping it real or faking it?
  21. 21. Leading the way in motorcycle ergonomics • Motorcycle simulator • interactive bike and projection screen • reconfigurable scenarios • a UK first • no other research simulator of its kind • a World first • no other motorcycle simulator is using the same software
  22. 22. Triumph Daytona
  23. 23. MotorcycleSim
  24. 24. MotorcycleSim
  25. 25. Thank You! Dr Alex W Stedmon alex.stedmon@nottingham.ac.uk

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