Marin Community Forum: Twitter: A Case Study [DRAFT]

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  • Overview: Hi everyone, I’m Amanda Jacobs Foust, the Electronic Services Librarian for Marin County Free Library which serves a population of 139,000, with 100+ employees spread over 10 branches, a bookmobile and literacy program . Additionally we are part of a Marin County consortium: MARINet, which includes six city libraries and one University; serving an additional 100,000+ patrons. @marinlibrary800 followers5279 tweets@annetkentroom:828 followers2360 tweets
  • Here’s our plan, in it’s simplest terms: everyone has access and is encouraged to spend up to two hours per month developing and posting per their branch manager’s discretion.. We provided individual and group trainings at each branch location to familiarize staff with each of the platforms. We created tip sheets, controlled vocabulary lists for tags and labeling and step by step instructions. We have multiple social media platforms; including blogs and Facebook. Obviously, today we will focus on Twitter. Now, some administrators tend to be concerned that staff will tweet inappropriately, but that has not been our experience. If you trust your employees to interact with the public unsupervised, you should be able to trust them to tweet unsupervised. Focus instead on what you can control. Really, the biggest challenge is making sure *someone tweets system-level stuff, since there can be a trend of everyone thinking someone else will do it. New Site: 11/2011Successes and Failures: When I took on the Electronic Services position, I knew I had a lot of work to do. My immediate predecessor was a role model for how not to do the job. I knew that re-doing the website would take a lot of time and energy and was prepared for obstacles, however, I underestimated the resistance staff would have for using social media. The Executive Team, who approved my rollout and implementation plan, only added one thing in anticipation of staff resistance, a committee, using the diagonal slice model, meaning we brought in a staffer from each committee and branch, as the implementation team and I remained optimistic.To describe me as naïve at this point would be an understatement. The idea behind the committee was to educate and train staff with the expectation that they would return to their branches and committees and spread their enthusiasm and training. Instead, it was inadvertently a group that wasn’t the least bit interested in social media or it’s value to our libraries. Our first three meetings were were dominated by staff objections to using social media. After six hours of discussion, I had to ban further discussion from the agenda, since we were the Implementation Team and that questions about why we were using social media had been thoroughly discussed and noted. Over time, we were able to overcome the initial negativity and get some work done. The committee developed project plans for each committee and branch, assisted in bringing MCFL under compliance of the County of Marin’s newly developed social media policy and procedure, developed the All-Staff Day presentation on social media and completed a statistical review of CA libraries with similar service populations and their social media usage. However, training the trainer wasn’t working and overwhelming, committee members felt that social media wasn’t their job. Maybe it was important and valuable, but someone else should do it. Instead, I relied on interns to develop training materials. Eventually, we started working together as a group and got some work done, but the continuing viewpoint of the majority was that the work related to implementation was the work of Electronic Services and not the committee.
  • Follow community members and partners, develop custom hashtags for conferences (and be sure to tweet while at conferences), use hashtags (twitter users expect it). Include photos and links. But don’t linkbait…
  • Hootsuite Pro for analytics. Twitter does not provide comparable statistics to Facebook.
  • Include photos or videos whenever possibleLimit one link per postUp to 20x per day. Include visuals, one link Don’t forget hashtagsDon’t be afraid to make mistakesHave fun!
  • Any tips from the audience?
  • Thank you!
  • Marin Community Forum: Twitter: A Case Study [DRAFT]

    1. 1. TWITTER: A CASE STUDY March 27, 2014 Marin Communication Forum, San Rafael, California Amanda Jacobs Foust Electronic Services Librarian afoust@marincounty.org Marin County Free Library
    2. 2. MARIN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY
    3. 3. SOCIAL MEDIA APPROACH All staff are encouraged to participate 1-2 hours per month/30 minutes per week Five social media platforms: oBlogs oFacebook oFlickr oGoogle+ oPinterest oTwitter oYoutube
    4. 4. LESSONS LEARNED http://www.adverblog.com/tag/social-media/
    5. 5. BUILDING FOLLOWERS http://occupystream.com/02/28/buying-twitter-followers-smart-decision/
    6. 6. ANALYTICS
    7. 7. BEST PRACTICES: CONSISTENCY
    8. 8. BEST PRACTICES: SENSITIVITY
    9. 9. TIPS & TRICKS http://www.duetsblog.com/2011/03/articles/marketing/hashtags-a-tutorial/
    10. 10. Amanda Jacobs Foust, Electronic Services Librarian Marin County Free Library afoust@marincounty.org @ajfoust QUESTIONS?

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