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SOCIAL
MEDIA
METRICS
10
What Matters is Measured
 Reach: The number of people exposed to a message.
 Frequency: The average number of times some...
Numbers versus Metrics
Four thousand two hundred and thirty-one is a
measurement. Without context, it is merely a
number.W...
Figure 10.1 The Engagement
Food Chain
Social Media Marketing, 2e©
©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015
10-4
Figure 10.2 Strategic Options
for Social Media Measurement
Social Media Marketing, 2e©
©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solo...
Key Performance Indicators
 Measurements within a defined contexts are
metrics.
 Measurements require context to provide...
Monthly Reporting Example
Social Media Marketing, 2e©
©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015
10-7
The DATA Approach
 Define: Define the results that the program is
designed to promote.
 Assess: Assess the costs of the ...
DEFINE
 Motivating some behavior from the target
audience.
 Influencing brand knowledge and attitudes.
 Accomplishing t...
SMART Objectives
 Specific
 Measurable
 Appropriate
 Realistic
 Time-oriented
Social Media Marketing, 2e©
©Tracy L. T...
Which One is Smart?
 “We will tell everyone we can about our Facebook
page and see if they like it so much they’ll buy
mo...
Table 10.1 Commonly Used
Social Media Metrics
 WOM volume
 Asset popularity
 Media mentions
 Brand liking
 Reach
 En...
Elements of the
Marketing Metrics Matrix
 Activity Metrics (input): What is placed in the
indicated social media spaces.
...
Return Metrics
 The return on impressions model demonstrates how
many media impressions were generated by the
social medi...
ASSESS
 Opportunity Cost: What else could employees or
volunteers have done if they weren’t spending
time contributing to...
Blog Value Index (BVI)
BVIa = [adh (aay/1,000)] / [abt * ehw]
 adh = average daily hits
 aay = average advertising yield...
TRACK
 Identify tracking mechanisms.
 Establish baseline comparisons.
 Create activity timelines.
 Develop transaction...
Tracking Approaches
1. ForwardTracking: Developed prior to launching
the activity or campaign.
2. CoincidentTracking: Begi...
Figure 10.4 A Baseline
Social Media Marketing, 2e©
©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015
10-19
ADJUST
 Apply what you’ve learned to future activities and
investments.
Social Media Marketing, 2e©
©Tracy L. Tuten and M...
Start Measuring
 Content consumption
 Content augmentation
 Content sharing
 Content loyalty
 Content conversations
...
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Chapter 10 (social metrics)

Chapter 10 of Social Media Marketing

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Chapter 10 (social metrics)

  1. 1. SOCIAL MEDIA METRICS 10
  2. 2. What Matters is Measured  Reach: The number of people exposed to a message.  Frequency: The average number of times someone is exposed to a message.  Site Stickiness: The ability of a site to draw repeat visits and keep people on the site.  Relative pull: a comparison of how well different creative executions generate a response of creative advertising.  Clickthroughs: The number of people exposed to an online ad or link who actually click on it.  Sales Conversions: The number of people who click through who go on to purchase a product.  Viewthroughs:The number of people who are exposed and do not click through, but who later visit the brand’s website. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-2
  3. 3. Numbers versus Metrics Four thousand two hundred and thirty-one is a measurement. Without context, it is merely a number.When compared with your personal best, company expectations, or your competitors’ efforts, that number becomes a metric. It is now indicative of value, importance or a change in results. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-3
  4. 4. Figure 10.1 The Engagement Food Chain Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-4
  5. 5. Figure 10.2 Strategic Options for Social Media Measurement Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-5
  6. 6. Key Performance Indicators  Measurements within a defined contexts are metrics.  Measurements require context to provide useful feedback.  Metrics that we tie to objectives are key performance indicators.  Objectives must be well-defined before we can identify key performance indicators. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-6
  7. 7. Monthly Reporting Example Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-7
  8. 8. The DATA Approach  Define: Define the results that the program is designed to promote.  Assess: Assess the costs of the program and the potential value of the results.  Track: Track the actual results and link those results to the program.  Adjust: Adjust the program based on results to optimize future outcomes. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-8
  9. 9. DEFINE  Motivating some behavior from the target audience.  Influencing brand knowledge and attitudes.  Accomplishing the first two objectives with fewer resources than might be required with other methods. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-9
  10. 10. SMART Objectives  Specific  Measurable  Appropriate  Realistic  Time-oriented Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-10
  11. 11. Which One is Smart?  “We will tell everyone we can about our Facebook page and see if they like it so much they’ll buy more product.”  “We will promote our new Facebook page in print ads placed in the June issue of Rolling Stone. On July 15th we will count the number of Facebook users who ‘like’ our brand and compare sales to the same period last year.” Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-11
  12. 12. Table 10.1 Commonly Used Social Media Metrics  WOM volume  Asset popularity  Media mentions  Brand liking  Reach  Engagement  Customer value  Ratings and bookmarks  SEO  Traffic  Share of voice  Influence  Sentiment Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-12
  13. 13. Elements of the Marketing Metrics Matrix  Activity Metrics (input): What is placed in the indicated social media spaces.  Interaction Metrics (responses): How the target market engages with the social media platform and activities.  Performance/Return Metrics (outcome): Outcomes that directly support the success of the brand, financially or otherwise. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-13
  14. 14. Return Metrics  The return on impressions model demonstrates how many media impressions were generated by the social media tactics employed.  The return on social media impact model attempts to track coverage across media and in different markets against sales over time  The return on target influence model relies upon survey data to assess the effectiveness of social media marketing  The return on earned media model uses a metric called advertising equivalency value to equate publicity in news media outlets to its paid advertising equivalent Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-14
  15. 15. ASSESS  Opportunity Cost: What else could employees or volunteers have done if they weren’t spending time contributing to the brand’s social media activity?  Speed of Response: Social media enable companies to identify crisis situations quickly and respond quickly.  Message Control: The brand’s message will be shared or manipulated in ways that the brand would rather not have happened. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-15
  16. 16. Blog Value Index (BVI) BVIa = [adh (aay/1,000)] / [abt * ehw]  adh = average daily hits  aay = average advertising yield  abt = average number of hours spent per day blogging  ehw = employee hourly wage of the blogger Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-16
  17. 17. TRACK  Identify tracking mechanisms.  Establish baseline comparisons.  Create activity timelines.  Develop transaction data.  Measure transaction precursors.  Overlay timelines and look for patterns. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-17
  18. 18. Tracking Approaches 1. ForwardTracking: Developed prior to launching the activity or campaign. 2. CoincidentTracking: Begins during the activity or campaign. 3. ReverseTracking: Conducted after an activity or campaign has concluded. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-18
  19. 19. Figure 10.4 A Baseline Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-19
  20. 20. ADJUST  Apply what you’ve learned to future activities and investments. Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-20
  21. 21. Start Measuring  Content consumption  Content augmentation  Content sharing  Content loyalty  Content conversations  Content engagement Social Media Marketing, 2e© ©Tracy L. Tuten and Michael R. Solomon 2015 10-21

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