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How are Mobile Medical Technologies Really Used In the Wild?

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Human-computer interaction healthcare PhD Research from Aisling Ann O'Kane of the University College London Interaction Centre. Slideshow is a submission to the EPSRC ICT Pioneers Award Second Round.

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How are Mobile Medical Technologies Really Used In the Wild?

  1. 1. How are Mobile Medical Technologies Really Used In the Wild? Aisling (ASH-Ling) Ann O’Kane BASc MSc PEng 4th Year PhD Student in Human-Computer Interaction UCL Interaction Centre Department of Computer Science University College London
  2. 2. • Devices used for the self-management of medical conditions that have to be carried on the person • Increasingly relied on as healthcare moves out of clinical settings, especially for chronic condition self-care What are Mobile Medical Devices? Images from http://amzn.to/1Kr0hoS, http://amzn.to/1dvdKgH, and http://amzn.to/1Kr0yrU
  3. 3. • Devices include blood glucose monitors, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, mobile apps, etc…. • These mobile devices are brought with people throughout their day, every day Type 1 Diabetes Technology Images from http://bit.ly/1RQH0Mo, http://bit.ly/1NsNGQi, http://bit.ly/1U54IbG, and http://yhoo.it/1NvlNq6
  4. 4. Everyday Type 1 Diabetes Tech Use They are used all day, everyday and everywhere: at work, in the car, and in the bar!
  5. 5. Situated Qualitative Studies of T1D Tech Images from orkposters.com and flickr user brianjmatis Conducted contextual interviews in coffee shops and cafes, collected diary accounts of use, and observed a meet-up in a hotel bar with 41 people with Type 1 Diabetes
  6. 6. Context Influences Use and Adoption
  7. 7. • Despite health concerns, adults choose when, where, and how to perform self-care based on context and user experience • Everyday life influences how mobile medical devices are adopted, carried and used • Using situated studies can uncover real world use, non-use, and misuse to influence design • Engaging with industry partners in the UK and beyond to implement these studies more broadly The Potential of Situated Studies
  8. 8. Future Research: Bespoke Technologies EPSRC Doctoral Prize at UCL leverage DIY hacker advances and disseminate bespoke devices to T1D non-hackers, safely
  9. 9. • A.A. O’Kane, S.Y. Park, H. Mentis, A. Blandford, Y. Chen. “It wasn’t just me!”: Supporting the Search for Chronic Condition Self-Management Strategies and Validation.” JCSCW, in submission. • C. Vincent, G. Niezen, A.A. O’Kane, and K. Stawarz. “Can standards and regulations keep up with health technology?” JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2015. • A.A. O’Kane, Y. Rogers, and A. Blandford. “Concealing or Revealing Mobile Medical Devices? Designing for Onstage and Offstage Presentation” CHI 2015. • M. Patel, and A.A. O'Kane. “Contextual Influences on the Use and Non-Use of Digital Technology While Exercising at the Gym” CHI 2015. • A.A. O'Kane, Y. Rogers, and A. Blandford. “Gaining Empathy for Non-Routine Mobile Device Use Through Autoethnography” CHI 2014. • A.A. O'Kane, H. Mentis, and E. Thereska. “Non-Static Nature of Patient Consent Over Time: Diabetic Patients' Changing Privacy Perspectives” CSCW 2013. Aisling (ASH-Ling) Ann O’Kane BASc MSc PEng 4th Year PhD Student in Human-Computer Interaction UCL Interaction Centre Department of Computer Science University College London Website www.ucl.ac.uk/uclic/people/a-okane Twitter @aislingannokane Email a.okane@cs.ucl.ac.uk How are Mobile Medical Technologies Really Used In the Wild?

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